beam vs shine what difference

what is difference between beam and shine

English

Etymology

From Middle English beem, from Old English bēam (tree, cross, gallows, column, pillar, wood, beam, splint, post, stock, rafter, piece of wood), from Proto-West Germanic *baum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz (tree, beam, balk), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to grow, swell). Cognate with West Frisian beam (tree), Saterland Frisian Boom (tree), Dutch boom (tree), German Low German Boom (tree), German Baum (tree), Luxembourgish Bam (tree), Albanian bimë (a plant). Doublet of boom.

The verb is from Middle English bemen, from Old English bēamian (to shine, to cast forth rays or beams of light), from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēm, IPA(key): /biːm/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

beam (plural beams)

  1. Any large piece of timber or iron long in proportion to its thickness, and prepared for use.
    • And a letter vnto Asaph the keeper of the kings forrest, that he may giue me timber to make beames for the gates of the palace which appertained to the house, and for the wall of the Citie, and for the house that I shall enter into: And the king granted me, according to the good hand of my God vpon me.
  2. One of the principal horizontal structural members, usually of timber or concrete, of a building; one of the transverse members of a ship’s frame on which the decks are laid — supported at the sides by knees in wooden ships and by stringers in steel ones.
    • 1905, Beatrix Potter, The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle
      Lucie opened the door: and what do you think there was inside the hill?—a nice clean kitchen with a flagged floor and wooden beams—just like any other farm kitchen.
  3. (nautical) The maximum width of a vessel (note that a vessel with a beam of 15 foot can also be said to be 15 foot abeam)
    Synonym: breadth
    • 1892, Sydney Marow Eardley-Wilmot, The Development of Navies During the Last Half-Century Chapter 7
      Being only 280 ft. long, with a beam of 66 ft, their speed is moderate, and for a long time difficulty was experienced in steering them.
  4. The crossbar of a mechanical balance, from the ends of which the scales are suspended.
  5. The principal stem of the antler of a deer.
  6. (literary) The pole of a carriage or chariot.
  7. (textiles) A cylinder of wood, making part of a loom, on which weavers wind the warp before weaving and the cylinder on which the cloth is rolled, as it is woven.
  8. The straight part or shank of an anchor.
  9. The central bar of a plow, to which the handles and colter are secured, and to the end of which are attached the oxen or horses that draw it.
  10. In steam engines, a heavy iron lever having an oscillating motion on a central axis, one end of which is connected with the piston rod from which it receives motion, and the other with the crank of the wheel shaft.
    Synonyms: working beam, walking beam
  11. A ray or collection of approximately parallel rays emitted from the sun or other luminous body.
    a beam of light
    a beam of energy
  12. (figuratively) A ray; a gleam.
    a beam of hope, or of comfort
  13. One of the long feathers in the wing of a hawk.
    Synonym: beam feather
  14. (music) A horizontal bar which connects the stems of two or more notes to group them and to indicate metric value.
  15. (railway) An elevated rectangular dirt pile used to cheaply build an elevated portion of a railway.
  16. (gymnastics) Ellipsis of balance beam

Hyponyms

  • (textiles): fore beam, back beam

See also

  • Thesaurus:stick

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

beam (third-person singular simple present beams, present participle beaming, simple past and past participle beamed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To emit beams of light; shine; radiate.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To smile broadly or especially cheerfully.
  3. (transitive) To furnish or supply with beams
  4. (transitive) To give the appearance of beams to.
  5. (transitive, science fiction) To transmit matter or information via a high-tech wireless mechanism.
  6. (transitive, currying) To stretch something (for example an animal hide) on a beam.
  7. (transitive, weaving) To put (something) on a beam
  8. (transitive, music) To connect (musical notes) with a beam, or thick line, in music notation.

Translations

Anagrams

  • BAME, Bame, Mabe, ambe, bema, mabe

German

Verb

beam

  1. singular imperative of beamen

Old English

Alternative forms

  • beom

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *baum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæ͜ɑːm/

Noun

bēam m (nominative plural bēamas)

  1. tree
    Synonyms: trēow, wudu
  2. beam of wood
    Synonym: bord
    1. gallows, gibbet (hanging device with a crossbeam)
      Synonyms: ġealga, ġealgtrēow, trēow, weargtrēow
    2. (by extension) the Cross
      • Codex Vercillensis

Declension

Derived terms

  • siġebēam

Descendants

  • Middle English: beem
    • Scots: beme
    • English: beam
      • German: beamen
      • Japanese: ビーム

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯am]

Verb

beam

  1. first-person singular imperfect indicative of bea
  2. first-person plural imperfect indicative of bea

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bām, from Proto-West Germanic *baum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪə̯m/

Noun

beam c (plural beammen, diminutive beamke)

  1. tree

Derived terms

  • hefbeam

Further reading

  • “beam”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Pronunciation

  • (US, UK) enPR: shīn, IPA(key): /ʃaɪn/, /ʃaːɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English shinen, schinen (preterite schon, past participle schinen), from Old English scīnan (“to shine, flash; be resplendent”; preterite scān, past participle scinen), from Proto-Germanic *skīnaną (to shine).

Verb

shine (third-person singular simple present shines, present participle shining, simple past and past participle shone or shined)

  1. (intransitive, copulative) To emit or reflect light so as to glow.
  2. (intransitive, copulative) To reflect light.
  3. (intransitive, copulative) To distinguish oneself; to excel.
    • 1867, Frederick William Robinson, No Man’s Friend, Harper & Brothers, page 91:
      [] I was grateful to you for giving him a year’s schooling—where he shined at it—and for putting him as a clerk in your counting-house, where he shined still more.”
    • It prompted an exchange of substitutions as Jermain Defoe replaced Palacios and Javier Hernandez came on for Berbatov, who had failed to shine against his former club.
  4. (intransitive, copulative) To be effulgent in splendour or beauty.
  5. (intransitive, copulative) To be eminent, conspicuous, or distinguished; to exhibit brilliant intellectual powers.
    • c. 1713, Jonathan Swift, Thoughts on Various Subjects
      Few are qualified to shine in company; but it in most men’s power to be agreeable.
  6. (intransitive, copulative) To be immediately apparent.
  7. (transitive) To create light with (a flashlight, lamp, torch, or similar).
    • 2007, David Lynn Goleman, Legend: An Event Group Thriller, St. Martin’s Press (2008), →ISBN, page 318:
      As Jenks shined the large spotlight on the water, he saw a few bubbles and four long wakes leading away from an expanding circle of blood.
  8. (transitive) To cause to shine, as a light.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature
      He [God] doth not rain wealth, nor shine honour and virtues, upon men equally.
  9. (US, transitive) To make bright; to cause to shine by reflected light.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (to emit light): beam, glow, radiate
  • (to reflect light): gleam, glint, glisten, glitter, reflect
  • (to distinguish oneself): excel
  • (to make smooth and shiny by rubbing): wax, buff, polish, furbish, burnish
Coordinate terms
  • (to emit light): beam, flash, glare, glimmer, shimmer, twinkle
Derived terms
  • beshine
  • rise and shine
  • take a shine to
Translations

Noun

shine (countable and uncountable, plural shines)

  1. Brightness from a source of light.
    • the distant shine of the celestial city
  2. Brightness from reflected light.
  3. Excellence in quality or appearance; splendour.
  4. Shoeshine.
  5. Sunshine.
    • 1685, John Dryden, Sylvae
      be fair or foul, or rain or shine
  6. (slang) Moonshine; illicitly brewed alcoholic drink.
  7. (cricket) The amount of shininess on a cricket ball, or on each side of the ball.
  8. (slang) A liking for a person; a fancy.
    She’s certainly taken a shine to you.
  9. (archaic, slang) A caper; an antic; a row.
Synonyms
  • (brightness from a source of light): effulgence, radiance, radiancy, refulgence, refulgency
  • (brightness from reflected light): luster
  • (excellence in quality or appearance): brilliance, splendor
  • (shoeshine): See shoeshine
  • (sunshine): See sunshine
  • (slang: moonshine): See moonshine
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From the noun shine, or perhaps continuing Middle English schinen in its causative uses, from Old English scīn (brightness, shine), and also Middle English schenen, from Old English scǣnan (to render brilliant, make shine), from Proto-Germanic *skainijaną, causative of *skīnaną (to shine).

Verb

shine (third-person singular simple present shines, present participle shining, simple past and past participle shined)

  1. (transitive) To cause (something) to shine; put a shine on (something); polish (something).
    He shined my shoes until they were polished smooth and gleaming.
  2. (transitive, cricket) To polish a cricket ball using saliva and one’s clothing.
Synonyms
  • (to polish): polish, smooth, smoothen
Translations

Anagrams

  • Enshi, Heins, Hines, NIEHS, hsien

Irish

Adjective

shine

  1. Lenited form of sine.

Noun

shine

  1. Lenited form of sine.

Japanese

Romanization

shine

  1. Rōmaji transcription of しね

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English sċīnan.

Verb

shine

  1. Alternative form of schinen

Etymology 2

From Old English sċinu.

Noun

shine

  1. Alternative form of shyn

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial