beard vs byssus what difference

what is difference between beard and byssus

English

Etymology

From Middle English berd, bard, bærd, from Old English beard, from Proto-West Germanic *bard, from Proto-Germanic *bardaz (compare West Frisian burd, Dutch baard, German Bart), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂, *bʰh₂erdʰeh₂ (compare Latin barba, Lithuanian barzda, Russian борода́ (borodá)). Doublet of barb.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɪəd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɪɹd/, /biɚd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)d
  • Homophone: beared (in accents with the near-square merger)

Noun

beard (plural beards)

  1. Facial hair on the chin, cheeks, jaw and neck.
  2. The cluster of small feathers at the base of the beak in some birds.
  3. The appendages to the jaw in some cetaceans, and to the mouth or jaws of some fishes.
  4. The byssus of certain shellfish.
  5. The gills of some bivalves, such as the oyster.
  6. In insects, the hairs of the labial palpi of moths and butterflies.
  7. (botany) Long or stiff hairs on a plant; the awn.
  8. A barb or sharp point of an arrow or other instrument, projecting backward to prevent the head from being easily drawn out.
  9. The curved underside of an axehead, extending from the lower end of the cutting edge to the axehandle.
  10. That part of the underside of a horse’s lower jaw which is above the chin, and bears the curb of a bridle.
  11. (printing, dated) That part of a type which is between the shoulder of the shank and the face.
  12. (LGBT, slang) A fake customer or companion, especially a woman who accompanies a gay man, or a man who accompanies a lesbian, in order to give the impression that the person being accompanied is heterosexual.

Derived terms

  • bearded
  • beardless
  • beardlike
  • beard-second
  • nosebeard

Translations

Verb

beard (third-person singular simple present beards, present participle bearding, simple past and past participle bearded)

  1. (obsolete) To grow hair on the chin and jaw.
  2. To boldly and bravely oppose or confront, often to the chagrin of the one being bearded.
    Robin Hood is always shown as bearding the Sheriff of Nottingham.
    • 1943, Crockett Johnson, Barnaby, December 6, 1943
      We need all our operatives to insure the success of my plan to beard this Claus in his den…
    • 1963, Ross Macdonald, The Chill, pg.92, Vintage Crime/Black Lizard
      . . . I bearded the judge in his chambers and told him that it shouldn’t be allowed.
  3. (transitive) To take by the beard; to seize, pluck, or pull the beard of (a man), in anger or contempt.
  4. (transitive) To deprive (an oyster or similar shellfish) of the gills.
  5. (LGBT, slang, transitive, intransitive) Of a gay man or woman: to accompany a gay person of the opposite sex in order to give the impression that they are heterosexual.
    • 1993, David Michael Robinson, Mollies are Not the Only Fruit (page 39)
      Lesbians and homosexual men bearding one another (i.e. providing each other with the public appearance of being heterosexual); []

Derived terms

  • beard the lion, beard the lion in his den

Translations

See also

  • goatee
  • hair
  • merkin
  • moustache, mustache
  • pogonophobia
  • sideburns, sideboards
  • whiskers
  • awn

Further reading

  • beard on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Bader, Breda, Debar, Debra, arbed, ardeb, bared, bread, debar

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *bardaz (compare West Frisian burd, Dutch baard, German Bart), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (compare Latin barba, Lithuanian barzda, Russian борода́ (borodá)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæ͜ɑrd/, [bæ͜ɑrˠd]

Noun

beard m (nominative plural beardas)

  1. beard

Declension

Derived terms

  • beardlēas

Descendants

  • Middle English: berd, bard, bærd, beord, burd
    • English: beard
    • Scots: berd, berde, beird
    • Yola: bearde


English

Etymology

From New Latin byssus (sea silk), from Latin byssus (fine cotton or cotton stuff, silk), from Ancient Greek βύσσος (bússos, a very fine yellowish flax and the linen woven from it), from Hebrew בּוּץ(búts), Aramaic בּוּצָא(būṣā).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɪ.səs/

Noun

byssus (usually uncountable, plural byssi or byssuses)

  1. An exceptionally fine and valuable fibre or cloth of ancient times. Originally used for fine flax and linens, the word was later extended to fine cottons, silks, and sea silk.
  2. The long fine silky filaments excreted by several mollusks (particularly Pinna nobilis) by which they attach themselves to the sea bed, and from which sea silk is manufactured.
  3. (mycology) The stipe or stem of some fungi which are particularly thin and thread-like.

Related terms

  • byssaceous
  • byssal
  • byssiferous
  • byssine
  • byssinosis
  • byssoid
  • byssogenous
  • byssolite

Translations

References

  • The Compact edition of the Oxford English dictionary: complete text reproduced micrographically and Supplement. Oxford at the Clarendon Press. 1987
  • Webster’s Third New International Dictionary (Unabridged) 1976. G. & C. Merriam Co.

Latin

Alternative forms

  • bissus

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βύσσος (bússos, a very fine yellowish flax and the linen woven from it), from Hebrew בּוּץ(búts), Aramaic בּוש(bus).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈbys.sus/, [ˈbʏs̠ːʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈbis.sus/, [ˈbisːus]

Noun

byssus f (genitive byssī); second declension

  1. byssus

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Descendants

  • Translingual: Byssus

References

  • byssus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • byssus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • byssus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • byssus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial