bearing vs charge what difference

what is difference between bearing and charge

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɛə̯ɹɪŋ/
  • (US) enPR: bâr’ĭng IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛəɹɪŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English beringe, berynge, berende, berande, berand, from Old English berende (bearing; fruitful) (also as synonym Old English bǣrende), from Proto-Germanic *berandz, present participle of Proto-Germanic *beraną (to bear; carry), equivalent to bear +‎ -ing.

Verb

bearing

  1. present participle of bear

Adjective

bearing (not comparable)

  1. (in combination) That bears (some specified thing).
    a gift-bearing visitor
  2. Of a beam, column, or other device, carrying weight or load.
    That’s a bearing wall.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bering, beringe, berynge, equivalent to bear +‎ -ing.

Noun

bearing (plural bearings)

  1. (mechanical engineering) A mechanical device that supports another part and/or reduces friction.
  2. (navigation, nautical) The horizontal angle between the direction of an object and another object, or between it and that of true north; a heading or direction.
  3. (in the plural, especially in phrases such as ‘get one’s bearings’) One’s understanding of one’s orientation or relative position, literally or figuratively.
    Do we go left here or straight on? Hold on, let me just get my bearings.
    I started a new job last week, and I still haven’t quite found my bearings.
  4. Relevance; a relationship or connection.
    That has no bearing on this issue.
  5. One’s posture, demeanor, or manner.
    She walks with a confident, self-assured bearing.
  6. (architecture) That part of any member of a building which rests upon its supports.
    A lintel or beam may have four inches of bearing upon the wall.
  7. (architecture) The portion of a support on which anything rests.
  8. (architecture, proscribed) The unsupported span.
    The beam has twenty feet of bearing between its supports.
  9. (heraldry) Any single emblem or charge in an escutcheon or coat of arms.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Notes of a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo
      Jos Sedley’s open carriage, with its magnificent armorial bearings.
Hyponyms
Related terms
  • find one’s bearings
  • get one’s bearings
  • lose one’s bearings
Translations
See also
  • ABEC
  • bearing on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Binegar, bangier, barge in


English

Etymology

From Middle English chargen, from Old French chargier, from Medieval Latin carricō (to load), from Latin carrus (a car, wagon); see car. Doublet of cargo.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɑːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɑɹd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)dʒ

Noun

charge (countable and uncountable, plural charges)

  1. The amount of money levied for a service.
  2. (military) A ground attack against a prepared enemy.
  3. A forceful forward movement.
  4. An accusation.
    Synonym: count
    1. An official description (by the police or a court) of a crime that somebody may be guilty of
    2. An accusation by a person or organization.
      • 2005, Lesley Brown (translator), Plato, Sophist. 261a.
  5. (physics and chemistry) An electric charge.
  6. The scope of someone’s responsibility.
    • 1848 April 24, John K. Kane, opinion, United States v. Hutchison, as reported in The Pennsylvania law Journal, June 1848 edition, as reprinted in, 1848,The Pennsylvania Law Journal volume 7, page 366 [2]:
  7. Someone or something entrusted to one’s care, such as a child to a babysitter or a student to a teacher.
  8. A load or burden; cargo.
  9. An instruction.
  10. (basketball) An offensive foul in which the player with the ball moves into a stationary defender.
  11. (firearms) A measured amount of powder and/or shot in a cartridge.
  12. (by extension) A measured amount of explosive.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      Watt might have broken the door down, with an axe, or a crow, or a small charge of explosive, but this might have aroused Erskine’s suspicions, and Watt did not want that.
  13. (heraldry) An image displayed on an escutcheon.
  14. (weaponry) A position (of a weapon) fitted for attack.
  15. (farriery) A sort of plaster or ointment.
  16. (obsolete) Weight; import; value.
  17. (historical or obsolete) A measure of thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; a charre.
  18. (ecclesiastical) An address given at a church service concluding a visitation.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

charge (third-person singular simple present charges, present participle charging, simple past and past participle charged)

  1. to assign a duty or responsibility to
    • Moses [] charged you to love the Lord your God.
  2. (transitive) to assign (a debit) to an account
  3. (transitive) to pay on account, as by using a credit card
  4. (transitive, intransitive) to require payment (of) (a price or fee, for goods, services, etc.)
  5. (possibly archaic) to sell at a given price.
  6. (law) to formally accuse (a person) of a crime.
  7. to impute or ascribe
    • No more accuse thy pen, but charge the crime / On native sloth, and negligence of time.
  8. to call to account; to challenge
  9. (transitive) to place a burden, load or responsibility on or in
    • the charging of children’s memories [] with rules
    • 1800, James Hogg, The Mysterious Bride
      [H]er grandfather [] charged her as she valued her life never to mention that again []
    • 1911, The Encyclopedia Britannica, entry on Moya:
      [A] huge torrent of boiling black mud, charged with blocks of rock and moving with enormous rapidity, rolled like an avalanche down the gorge.
    1. to ornament with or cause to bear
    2. (heraldry) to assume as a bearing
    3. (heraldry) to add to or represent on
  10. (transitive) to load equipment with material required for its use, as a firearm with powder, a fire hose with water, a chemical reactor with raw materials
    Charge your weapons; we’re moving up.
    1. (transitive) to cause to take on an electric charge
    2. (transitive) to replenish energy to (a battery, or a device containing a battery) by use of an electrical device plugged into a power outlet.
    3. (intransitive, of a battery or a device containing a battery) To replenish energy.
  11. (intransitive) to move forward quickly and forcefully, particularly in combat and/or on horseback
    1. (military, transitive and intransitive) to attack by moving forward quickly in a group
    2. (basketball) to commit a charging foul
    3. (cricket, of a batsman) to take a few steps down the pitch towards the bowler as he delivers the ball, either to disrupt the length of the delivery, or to get into a better position to hit the ball
  12. (transitive, of a hunting dog) to lie on the belly and be still (A command given by a hunter to a dog)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • charge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • charge in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Creagh

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • chargie (obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French charge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃɑr.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: char‧ge

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. A charge (fast ground attack).

Derived terms

  • cavaleriecharge

Related terms

  • chargeren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: sarsie

French

Etymology

From Middle French charge, from Old French charge, carge, equivalent to a deverbal from charger.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃaʁʒ/

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. load, burden
  2. cargo, freight
  3. responsibility, charge
  4. (law) charge
  5. (military) charge
  6. caricature, comic exaggeration
  7. (physics) charge
  8. (heraldry) charge
  9. (in the plural) costs, expenses

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Portuguese: charge

Verb

charge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of charger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of charger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of charger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of charger
  5. second-person singular imperative of charger

Further reading

  • “charge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • gâcher

Middle English

Verb

charge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of chargen

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from French charge.

Noun

charge f (plural charges)

  1. cartoon (satire of public figures)
    Synonym: cartum

Further reading

  • charge on the Portuguese Wikipedia.Wikipedia pt

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