beast vs savage what difference

what is difference between beast and savage

English

Alternative forms

  • beest (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English beeste, beste, from Old French beste (French bête), from Latin bēstia (animal, beast); many cognates – see bēstia.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /biːst/
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Noun

beast (plural beasts)

  1. Any animal other than a human; usually only applied to land vertebrates, especially large or dangerous four-footed ones.
  2. (more specific) A domestic animal, especially a bovine farm animal.
    • Boxer was an enormous beast, nearly eighteen hands high, and as strong as any two ordinary horses put together.
  3. A person who behaves in a violent, antisocial or uncivilized manner.
  4. (slang) Anything regarded as larger or more powerful than one of its normal size or strength.
    That is a beast of a stadium.
    The subwoofer that comes with this set of speakers is a beast.
  5. (slang) Someone who is particularly impressive, especially athletically or physically.
  6. (prison slang, derogatory) A sex offender.
    • 1994, Elaine Player, Michael Jenkins, Prisons After Woolf: Reform Through Riot (page 190)
      Shouts had been heard: ‘We’re coming to kill you, beasts.’ In desperation, Rule 43s had tried to barricade their doors []
  7. (figuratively) Something unpleasant and difficult.
    • 2000, Tom Clancy, The Bear and the Dragon, Berkley (2001), →ISBN, page 905:
      [] Even unopposed, the natural obstacles are formidable, and defending his line of advance will be a beast of a problem.”
    • 2006, Heather Burt, Adam’s Peak, Dundurn Press (2006), →ISBN, page 114:
      He’d be in the hospital a few days — broken collarbone, a cast on his arm, a beast of a headache — but fine.
  8. A thing or matter, especially a difficult or unruly one.

Derived terms

  • beastly
  • minibeast
  • saddle beast
  • beast of burden

Related terms

  • bestial
  • bestiary

Translations

See also

  • belluine (suppletive adjective)

Derived terms

Related terms

Verb

beast (third-person singular simple present beasts, present participle beasting, simple past and past participle beasted)

  1. (Britain, military) to impose arduous exercises, either as training or as punishment.

Adjective

beast (comparative more beast, superlative most beast)

  1. (slang, chiefly Midwestern and northeastern US) great; excellent; powerful
    • 1999, “Jason Chue”, AMD K6-2 350mhz, FIC VA503+, LGS 64mb PC100 sdram (on newsgroup jaring.pcbase)
      There is another type from Siemens which is the HYB 39S64XXX(AT/ATL) -8B version (notice the “B” and the end) which is totally beast altogether.

Anagrams

  • Bates, Sebat, abets, baste, bates, beats, besat, betas, esbat, tabes

Middle English

Noun

beast

  1. Alternative form of beeste


English

Etymology

From Middle English savage, from Old French sauvage, salvage (wild, savage, untamed), from Late Latin salvaticus, alteration of Latin silvaticus (wild”; literally, “of the woods), from silva (forest”, “grove).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsævɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ævɪdʒ
  • Hyphenation: sav‧age

Adjective

savage (comparative more savage, superlative most savage)

  1. Wild; not cultivated.
  2. Barbaric; not civilized.
  3. Fierce and ferocious.
  4. Brutal, vicious, or merciless.
  5. (Britain, slang) Unpleasant or unfair.
    – I’ll see you in detention.
    – Ah, savage!
  6. (Ireland, US, slang) Great, brilliant, amazing.
    Synonyms: wicked; see also Thesaurus:excellent
  7. (heraldry) Nude; naked.

Related terms

  • sylvan (see for more terms)

Translations

Noun

savage (plural savages)

  1. (derogatory) A person living in a traditional, especially tribal, rather than civilized society, especially when viewed as uncivilized and uncultivated; a barbarian.
  2. (figuratively) A defiant person.

Alternative forms

  • salvage

Translations

Verb

savage (third-person singular simple present savages, present participle savaging, simple past and past participle savaged) (transitive)

  1. To attack or assault someone or something ferociously or without restraint.
  2. (figuratively) To criticise vehemently.
  3. (of an animal) To attack with the teeth.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To make savage.
    • Its bloodhounds, savaged by a cross of wolf.

Translations

Anagrams

  • agaves

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • sauvage, saveage, salvage

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French savage, from Late Latin salvāticus, from Latin silvāticus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saˈvaːdʒ(ə)/, /saˈvau̯dʒ(ə)/

Adjective

savage

  1. savage, barbaric, unmannered, primitive
  2. wild, untamed, harsh
  3. mighty, strong, powerful
  4. ferocious, angry, attacking, opposed
  5. (rare) demented, crazy, insane
  6. (rare) ill-thought, ill-advised

Derived terms

  • savagyne

Descendants

  • English: savage
  • Scots: savage

References

  • “savāǧe, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-28.

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