beast vs wildcat what difference

what is difference between beast and wildcat

English

Alternative forms

  • beest (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English beeste, beste, from Old French beste (French bête), from Latin bēstia (animal, beast); many cognates – see bēstia.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /biːst/
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Noun

beast (plural beasts)

  1. Any animal other than a human; usually only applied to land vertebrates, especially large or dangerous four-footed ones.
  2. (more specific) A domestic animal, especially a bovine farm animal.
    • Boxer was an enormous beast, nearly eighteen hands high, and as strong as any two ordinary horses put together.
  3. A person who behaves in a violent, antisocial or uncivilized manner.
  4. (slang) Anything regarded as larger or more powerful than one of its normal size or strength.
    That is a beast of a stadium.
    The subwoofer that comes with this set of speakers is a beast.
  5. (slang) Someone who is particularly impressive, especially athletically or physically.
  6. (prison slang, derogatory) A sex offender.
    • 1994, Elaine Player, Michael Jenkins, Prisons After Woolf: Reform Through Riot (page 190)
      Shouts had been heard: ‘We’re coming to kill you, beasts.’ In desperation, Rule 43s had tried to barricade their doors []
  7. (figuratively) Something unpleasant and difficult.
    • 2000, Tom Clancy, The Bear and the Dragon, Berkley (2001), →ISBN, page 905:
      [] Even unopposed, the natural obstacles are formidable, and defending his line of advance will be a beast of a problem.”
    • 2006, Heather Burt, Adam’s Peak, Dundurn Press (2006), →ISBN, page 114:
      He’d be in the hospital a few days — broken collarbone, a cast on his arm, a beast of a headache — but fine.
  8. A thing or matter, especially a difficult or unruly one.

Derived terms

  • beastly
  • minibeast
  • saddle beast
  • beast of burden

Related terms

  • bestial
  • bestiary

Translations

See also

  • belluine (suppletive adjective)

Derived terms

Related terms

Verb

beast (third-person singular simple present beasts, present participle beasting, simple past and past participle beasted)

  1. (Britain, military) to impose arduous exercises, either as training or as punishment.

Adjective

beast (comparative more beast, superlative most beast)

  1. (slang, chiefly Midwestern and northeastern US) great; excellent; powerful
    • 1999, “Jason Chue”, AMD K6-2 350mhz, FIC VA503+, LGS 64mb PC100 sdram (on newsgroup jaring.pcbase)
      There is another type from Siemens which is the HYB 39S64XXX(AT/ATL) -8B version (notice the “B” and the end) which is totally beast altogether.

Anagrams

  • Bates, Sebat, abets, baste, bates, beats, besat, betas, esbat, tabes

Middle English

Noun

beast

  1. Alternative form of beeste


English

Alternative forms

  • wild-cat, wild cat

Etymology

From Middle English wyld cat, wylde cat (in the plural as wild cattes, wylde catis, wyle cattes), equivalent to wild +‎ cat.

Its adjectival senses were originally American and derived from the “wildcat banks” of Michigan, following its elevation to statehood in 1837. Two laws—one easing the requirements for establishing a new bank and another occasioned by the Panic of 1837 that removed the need for payment in specie—led to the creation and collapse of around 50 banks within two years. The term is apocryphally derived from a wildcat supposedly featured on the currency printed by one of these banks, but more probably derived from the remote locations “where the wildcats roamed” chosen by these banks to avoid oversight and minimize redemption of notes.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈwaɪldˌkæt/
  • Hyphenation: wild‧cat

Noun

wildcat (plural wildcats)

  1. A cat that lives in the wilderness, specifically
    1. (Britain) Felis silvestris, a common small Old World wild cat somewhat larger than a house cat.
    2. (US) A bobcat (Lynx rufus) or other similar New World species of lynx.
    3. Any feral cat.
    4. (uncommon) Alternative spelling of wild cat, any undomesticated felid, as tigers or lions.
      • 2003 April 24, CNN
        Upon checking it out, we found a total of 13 newborn wildcats: nine newborn tigers and two newborn leopards.
  2. (figuratively) A person who acts like a wildcat, (usually) a violent and easily-angered person or a sexually vigorous one.
    • 2002 September 26, The Young and the Restless
      Anyone who’s man enough to have landed a wildcat like you had to be quite a guy.
  3. (American football) An offensive formation with an unbalanced line and a snap directly to the running back rather than the quarterback.
  4. (nautical) A wheel that can be adjusted so as to revolve either with or on the shaft of a capstan.
  5. (firearms) Clipping of wildcat cartridge.
  6. (uncommon) Clipping of wildcat strike, a strike undertaken without authorization from the relevant trade union.
  7. (obsolete) Clipping of wildcat money, notes issued by a wildcat bank.

Synonyms

  • (Eurasian wildcats): desert cat
  • (American wildcats): See bobcat
  • (wild house cats): See feral cat

Hypernyms

  • (felines): See cat, lynx, and wild cat

Hyponyms

  • (Eurasian wildcats, proper subspecies): European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris), African wildcat (F. s. lybica), Asiatic wildcat (F. s. ornata), Southern African wildcat (F. s. cafra), Chinese mountain cat (F. s. bieti)
  • (Eurasian wildcats, informal types): Abyssinian wildcat, Arabian wildcat, Balearic wildcat, bay wildcats, bush wildcats, Caucasian wildcat, Corsica wildcat, Cretan wildcat, East African wildcat, forest wildcats, Hausa wildcat, Iraqi wildcat, Kalahari wildcat, Mid-belt wildcat, Mongolian wildcat, Rhodesian wildcat, Scottish wildcat, steppe wildcats, Syrian wildcat, Tristram’s wildcat, Turkestan wildcat, Ugandan wildcat

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

wildcat (not comparable)

  1. (usually derogatory) Of or concerning businesses operating outside standard or legitimate practice, especially:
    1. (derogatory, dated) Of or concerning irresponsible banks or banking, (particularly) small, independent operations.
    2. Of or concerning oil exploration in new areas, (particularly) small, independent operations.
    3. Of or concerning actions undertaken by workers without approval or in defiance of the formal leadership of their trade unions.
  2. (firearms) Of or concerning customized or hand-made cartridges.
  3. Unauthorized by the proper authorities.
    • 2003 June 15, CNN
      Jewish settlers have also been active putting up five new wildcat outposts on hilltops in the West Bank to try to thwart their Prime Minister Ariel Sharon.

Derived terms

  • wildcat bank, wildcat banking, wildcat note, wildcat money, wildcat currency
  • wildcat strike

Translations

Verb

wildcat (third-person singular simple present wildcats, present participle wildcatting, simple past and past participle wildcatted)

  1. To drill for oil in an area where no oil has been found before.
    You’d have to be very rich or very desperate to go wildcatting that far east.

Derived terms

  • wildcatter
  • wilkies

See also

  • Wildcat formation on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • (Eurasian wildcat): Martelli’s wildcat (F. lunensis), sand cat, jungle cat, black-footed cat
  • (American wildcat): See bobcat and lynx

References

Anagrams

  • clitwad

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial