beast vs wolf what difference

what is difference between beast and wolf

English

Alternative forms

  • beest (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English beeste, beste, from Old French beste (French bête), from Latin bēstia (animal, beast); many cognates – see bēstia.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /biːst/
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Noun

beast (plural beasts)

  1. Any animal other than a human; usually only applied to land vertebrates, especially large or dangerous four-footed ones.
  2. (more specific) A domestic animal, especially a bovine farm animal.
    • Boxer was an enormous beast, nearly eighteen hands high, and as strong as any two ordinary horses put together.
  3. A person who behaves in a violent, antisocial or uncivilized manner.
  4. (slang) Anything regarded as larger or more powerful than one of its normal size or strength.
    That is a beast of a stadium.
    The subwoofer that comes with this set of speakers is a beast.
  5. (slang) Someone who is particularly impressive, especially athletically or physically.
  6. (prison slang, derogatory) A sex offender.
    • 1994, Elaine Player, Michael Jenkins, Prisons After Woolf: Reform Through Riot (page 190)
      Shouts had been heard: ‘We’re coming to kill you, beasts.’ In desperation, Rule 43s had tried to barricade their doors []
  7. (figuratively) Something unpleasant and difficult.
    • 2000, Tom Clancy, The Bear and the Dragon, Berkley (2001), →ISBN, page 905:
      [] Even unopposed, the natural obstacles are formidable, and defending his line of advance will be a beast of a problem.”
    • 2006, Heather Burt, Adam’s Peak, Dundurn Press (2006), →ISBN, page 114:
      He’d be in the hospital a few days — broken collarbone, a cast on his arm, a beast of a headache — but fine.
  8. A thing or matter, especially a difficult or unruly one.

Derived terms

  • beastly
  • minibeast
  • saddle beast
  • beast of burden

Related terms

  • bestial
  • bestiary

Translations

See also

  • belluine (suppletive adjective)

Derived terms

Related terms

Verb

beast (third-person singular simple present beasts, present participle beasting, simple past and past participle beasted)

  1. (Britain, military) to impose arduous exercises, either as training or as punishment.

Adjective

beast (comparative more beast, superlative most beast)

  1. (slang, chiefly Midwestern and northeastern US) great; excellent; powerful
    • 1999, “Jason Chue”, AMD K6-2 350mhz, FIC VA503+, LGS 64mb PC100 sdram (on newsgroup jaring.pcbase)
      There is another type from Siemens which is the HYB 39S64XXX(AT/ATL) -8B version (notice the “B” and the end) which is totally beast altogether.

Anagrams

  • Bates, Sebat, abets, baste, bates, beats, besat, betas, esbat, tabes

Middle English

Noun

beast

  1. Alternative form of beeste


English

Etymology

From Middle English wolf, from Old English wulf, ƿulf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz (compare Saterland Frisian Wulf, West Frisian and Dutch wolf, German Wolf, Norwegian and Danish ulv), from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos (compare Sanskrit वृक (vṛ́ka), Persian گرگ(gorg), Lithuanian vilkas, Russian волк (volk), Albanian ujk, Latin lupus, Greek λύκος (lýkos), Tocharian B walkwe). Doublet of lobo and lupus.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wo͝olf
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wʊlf/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /wʊlf/, [wʊ̠ɫf], [wɫ̩f]
    • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /wʊlf/, [wʊwf]
  • enPR: wo͝of, IPA(key): /wʊf/ (now nonstandard)
  • enPR: wŭlf, IPA(key): /wʌlf/ (obsolete)
  • Rhymes: -ʊlf

Noun

wolf (plural wolves)

  1. The gray wolf (Canis lupus); the largest of the canine subfamily.
  2. A man who makes amorous advances to many women.
  3. (music) A wolf tone or wolf note.
  4. (figuratively) Any very ravenous, rapacious, or destructive person or thing; especially, want; starvation.
  5. One of the destructive, and usually hairy, larvae of several species of beetles and grain moths.
  6. A white worm, or maggot, which infests granaries.
  7. (obsolete) An eating ulcer or sore. See lupus.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      If God should send a cancer upon thy face, or a wolf into thy side
  8. A willying machine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)

Synonyms

  • loafer, lobo, lofer, loper, lover (Southwestern US dialects)

Hypernyms

  • (large wild canid): Canis lupus, canid

Hyponyms

  • (large wild canid): she-wolf, wolfess

Coordinate terms

  • (large wild canid): dingo, dog (members of Canis lupus not called wolf); coyote, jackal, fox (other canids)

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Ido: volfo (also from German)

Translations

Verb

wolf (third-person singular simple present wolfs, present participle wolfing, simple past and past participle wolfed)

  1. (transitive) To devour; to gobble; to eat (something) voraciously.
  2. (intransitive, slang) To make amorous advances to many women; to hit on women; to cruise for sex.
  3. (intransitive) To hunt for wolves.

Synonyms

  • (devour, gobble): gulp down, wolf down

Translations

Further reading

  • wolf on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • flow, fowl

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch wolf, from Middle Dutch wolf, from Old Dutch *wulf, *wolf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Noun

wolf (plural wolwe)

  1. wolf

Alemannic German

Etymology

From Middle High German wolf, from Old High German wolf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz. Cognate with German Wolf, Dutch wolf, English wolf, Icelandic úlfur.

Noun

wolf m

  1. (Carcoforo, Formazza, Gressoney, Issime, Rimella and Campello Monti) wolf

References

  • “wolf” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch wolf, from Old Dutch *wulf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɔlf/
  • Hyphenation: wolf
  • Rhymes: -ɔlf

Noun

wolf m (plural wolven, diminutive wolfje n, feminine wolvin)

  1. wolf, undomesticated Canis lupus
  2. one of many other canids of the family Canidae, especially of the genus Canis

Hypernyms

  • hondachtige

Hypernyms

  • hond

Holonyms

  • roedel

Derived terms

Related terms

  • welp

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: wolf
  • Jersey Dutch: wâlf
  • Negerhollands: wuluwuluk
    • Virgin Islands Creole: wuluwuluk (dated)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *wulf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Noun

wolf m

  1. wolf, grey wolf

Inflection

Derived terms

  • wēerwolf

Descendants

  • Dutch: wolf
    • Afrikaans: wolf
    • Jersey Dutch: wâlf
    • Negerhollands: wuluwuluk
      • Virgin Islands Creole: wuluwuluk (dated)
  • Limburgish: wólf

Further reading

  • “wolf (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “wolf (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • wulf, woulf, wolfe

Etymology

From Old English wulf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wulf/

Noun

wolf (plural wolves, diminutive wolfy, wolfie)

  1. wolf, lupine
  2. terrifying person

Descendants

  • English: wolf
  • Scots: wolf, woulf, wouff

Middle High German

Etymology

From Old High German wolf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Noun

wolf m

  1. wolf

Descendants

  • Alemannic German: wolf (Italian Walser)
  • Bavarian:
    Cimbrian: bolf
    Mòcheno: bolf
    Udinese: bolf, bölf
  • German: Wolf
  • Hunsrik: Wollef
  • Luxembourgish: Wollef
  • Pennsylvania German: Wolf
  • Vilamovian: wūf
  • Yiddish: וואָלף(volf)

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wolf/

Noun

wolf m (plural wolfa)

  1. wolf

Declension

Derived terms

  • wolfbizzo
  • Wolfgang

Descendants

  • Middle High German: wolf
    • Alemannic German: wolf (Italian Walser)
    • Bavarian:
      Cimbrian: bolf
      Mòcheno: bolf
      Udinese: bolf, bölf
    • German: Wolf
    • Hunsrik: Wollef
    • Luxembourgish: Wollef
    • Pennsylvania German: Wolf
    • Vilamovian: wūf
    • Yiddish: וואָלף(volf)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian wolf, from Proto-West Germanic *wulf, from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.

Noun

wolf c (plural wolven, diminutive wolfke)

  1. wolf

Further reading

  • “wolf”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial