beat vs measure what difference

what is difference between beat and measure

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English mesure, from Old French mesure, from Latin mēnsūra (a measuring, rule, something to measure by), from mēnsus, past participle of mētīrī (to measure, mete). Displaced native Middle English mǣte, mete (measure) (from Old English met (measure), compare Old English mitta (a measure)), Middle English ameten, imeten (to measure) (from Old English āmetan, ġemetan (to mete, measure)), Middle English hof, hoof (measure, reason) (from Old Norse hōf (measure, reason)), Old English mǣþ (measure, degree).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmɛʒ.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmɛʒ.ɚ/
  • (regional US) IPA(key): /ˈmeɪ.ʒɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʒə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: meas‧ure; mea‧sure

Noun

measure (plural measures)

  1. A prescribed quantity or extent.
    1. (obsolete) Moderation, temperance. [13th-19th c.]
      • c. 1390, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
        Mesure is medcynee · þouȝ þow moche ȝerne.
      • 1611, Bible, Authorized Version, Jer. XXX:
        I will correct thee in measure, and will not leaue thee altogether vnpunished.
    2. A limit that cannot be exceeded; a bound. (Now chiefly in set phrases.) [from 14th c.]
      • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, V:
        Full to the utmost measure of what bliss Human desires can seek or apprehend.
      • 2009, Mike Selvey, The Guardian, 25 Aug 2009:
        They have gloried to this day, the tedious interminable big-screen replays of that golden summer irritating beyond measure.
    3. An (unspecified) portion or quantity. [from 16th c.]
      • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Danny Welbeck leads England’s rout of Moldova but hit by Ukraine ban (in The Guardian, 6 September 2013)[1]:
        It ended up being a bittersweet night for England, full of goals to send the crowd home happy, buoyed by the news that Montenegro and Poland had drawn elsewhere in Group H but also with a measure of regret about what happened to Danny Welbeck and what it means for Roy Hodgson’s team going into a much more difficult assignment against Ukraine.
  2. The act or result of measuring.
    1. (now chiefly cooking) A receptacle or vessel of a standard size, capacity etc. as used to deal out specific quantities of some substance. [from 14th c.]
    2. A standard against which something can be judged; a criterion. [from 14th c.]
    3. Any of various standard units of capacity. [from 14th c.]
    4. A unit of measurement. [from 14th c.]
      • 1993, Scientific American February 33.3:
        The fragments shrank by increments of about three kilodaltons (a measure of molecular weight).
    5. The size of someone or something, as ascertained by measuring. (Now chiefly in make to measure.) [from 14th c.]
      • The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
    6. (now rare) The act or process of measuring. [from 14th c.]
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
    7. A ruler, measuring stick, or graduated tape used to take measurements. [from 16th c.]
    8. (mathematics, now rare) A number which is contained in a given number a number of times without a remainder; a divisor or factor. [from 16th c.]
      the greatest common measure of two or more numbers
    9. (geology) A bed or stratum. [from 17th c.]
      coal measures; lead measures
    10. (mathematics) A function that assigns a non-negative number to a given set following the mathematical nature that is common among length, volume, probability and the like. [from 20th c.]
  3. Metrical rhythm.
    1. (now archaic) A melody. [from 14th c.]
    2. (now archaic) A dance. [from 15th c.]
    3. (poetry) The manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or long and short syllables; meter; rhythm; hence, a metrical foot. [from 15th c.]
      a poem in iambic measure
    4. (music) A musical designation consisting of all notes and or rests delineated by two vertical bars; an equal and regular division of the whole of a composition; a bar. [from 17th c.]
  4. A course of action.
    1. (in the plural) Actions designed to achieve some purpose; plans. [from 17th c.]
    2. A piece of legislation. [from 18th c.]

Synonyms

  • (musical designation): bar
  • (unit of measurement): metric

Hyponyms

  • (mathematics): positive measure, signed measure, complex measure, Borel measure, σ-finite measure, complete measure, Lebesgue measure

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

measure (third-person singular simple present measures, present participle measuring, simple past and past participle measured)

  1. To ascertain the quantity of a unit of material via calculated comparison with respect to a standard.
  2. To be of (a certain size), to have (a certain measurement)
  3. To estimate the unit size of something.
  4. To judge, value, or appraise.
  5. To obtain or set apart; to mark in even increments.
  6. (rare) To traverse, cross, pass along; to travel over.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds
      “And for a very sensible reason; there never was but one like her; or, that is, I have always thought so until to-day,” replied the tar, glancing toward Natalie; “for my old eyes have seen pretty much everything they have got in this little world. Ha! I should like to see the inch of land or water that my foot hasn’t measured.”
  7. To adjust by a rule or standard.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      To secure a contented spirit, you must measure your desires by your fortune and condition, not your fortunes by your desires
  8. To allot or distribute by measure; to set off or apart by measure; often with out or off.
    • With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.
    • That portion of eternity which is called time, measured out by the sun.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • “measure”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • measure in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • measure in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • measure at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Reaumes

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