beat vs outfox what difference

what is difference between beat and outfox

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Etymology

out- +‎ fox

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɒks

Verb

outfox (third-person singular simple present outfoxes, present participle outfoxing, simple past and past participle outfoxed)

  1. (transitive) to beat in a competition of wits

Synonyms

  • outguess, outsmart, outwit

Translations


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