beat vs pound what difference

what is difference between beat and pound

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English pound, from Old English pund (a pound, weight), from Proto-Germanic *pundą (pound, weight), an early borrowing from Latin pondō (by weight), ablative form of pondus (weight), from Proto-Indo-European *pend-, *spend- (to pull, stretch). Cognate with Dutch pond, German Pfund, Swedish pund. Doublet of pood.

Noun

pound (plural pounds) (sometimes pound after numerals)

  1. A unit of mass equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces (= 453.592 37 g). Today this value is the most common meaning of “pound” as a unit of weight.
    Synonym: lb
  2. A unit of mass equal to 12 troy ounces (≈ 373.242 g). Today, this is a common unit of weight when measuring precious metals, and is little used elsewhere.
    Synonym: lb t
  3. (US) The symbol # (octothorpe, hash)
    Synonyms: hash, sharp
  4. The unit of currency used in the United Kingdom and its dependencies. It is divided into 100 pence.
    Synonyms: £, pound sterling, GBP, quid, nicker
  5. Any of various units of currency used in Egypt and Lebanon, and formerly in the Republic of Ireland, Cyprus and Israel.
    Synonym: punt
  6. Any of various units of currency formerly used in the United States.
  7. Abbreviation for pound-force, a unit of force/weight. Using this abbreviation to describe pound-force is inaccurate and unscientific.
Usage notes
  • Internationally, the “pound” has most commonly referred to the UK pound, £, (pound sterling). The other currencies were usually distinguished in some way, e.g., the “Irish pound” or the “punt”.
  • In the vicinity of each other country calling its currency the pound among English speakers the local currency would be the “pound”, with all others distinguished, e.g., the “British pound”, the “Egyptian pound” etc.
  • The general plural of “pound” has usually been “pounds” (at least since Chaucer), but the continuing use of the Old English genitive or neuter “pound” as the plural after numerals (for both currency and weight) is common in some regions. It can be considered correct, or colloquial, depending on region.
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • Pound (the unit of mass) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Pound (the UK unit of currency) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • crown, farthing, florin, guinea, penny, pence, shilling, sovereign, sterling

Etymology 2

From Middle English pounde, ponde, pund, from Old English pund (an enclosure), related to Old English pyndan (to enclose, shut up, dam, impound). Compare also Old English pynd (a cistern, lake).

Noun

pound (plural pounds)

  1. A place for the detention of stray or wandering animals.
    Synonym: animal shelter
  2. (metonymically) The people who work for the pound.
  3. (Britain) A place for the detention of automobiles that have been illegally parked, abandoned, etc. Short form of impound.
    Synonyms: (UK) car pound, (US) impound lot, (US) impound
  4. A section of a canal between two adjacent locks.
    Synonym: reach
  5. A kind of fishing net, having a large enclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.
  6. (Newfoundland) a division inside a fishing stage where cod is cured in salt brine
    Synonym: bulk
Usage notes
  • Manx English uses this word uncountably.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

pound (third-person singular simple present pounds, present participle pounding, simple past and past participle pounded)

  1. To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.
    • c. 1620, anonymous, “Tom o’ Bedlam’s Song” in Giles Earle his Booke (British Museum, Additional MSS. 24, 665):
      When I short haue shorne my sowce face
      & swigg’d my horny barrell,
      In an oaken Inne I pound my skin
      as a suite of guilt apparrell

Etymology 3

From an alteration of earlier poun, pown, from Middle English pounen, from Old English pūnian (to pound, beat, bray, bruise, crush), from Proto-Germanic *pūnōną (to break to pieces, pulverise). Related to Saterland Frisian Pün (debris, fragments), Dutch puin (debris, fragments, rubbish), Low German pun (fragments). Perhaps influenced by Etymology 2 Middle English *pound, pond, from Old English *pund, pynd, in relation to the hollow mortar for pounding with the pestle.

Alternative forms

  • poun, pown (obsolete or dialectal)

Verb

pound (third-person singular simple present pounds, present participle pounding, simple past and past participle pounded)

  1. (transitive) To strike hard, usually repeatedly.
    Synonyms: hammer, pelt; see also Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To crush to pieces; to pulverize.
    Synonyms: pulverate, triturate
  3. (transitive, slang) To eat or drink very quickly.
    Synonyms: bolt, down, chug; see also Thesaurus:eat, Thesaurus:drink
  4. (transitive, baseball, slang) To pitch consistently to a certain location.
  5. (intransitive, of a body part, generally heart, blood, or head) To beat strongly or throb.
  6. (transitive, vulgar, slang) To penetrate sexually, with vigour.
    Synonyms: drill, get up in, nail, poke; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  7. To advance heavily with measured steps.
  8. (engineering) To make a jarring noise, as when running.
  9. (slang, dated) To wager a pound on.
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • bang

Noun

pound (plural pounds)

  1. A hard blow.
    Synonym: pounding
Translations

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • pounde, pund, punde, powund

Etymology

From Old English pund, in turn from Proto-Germanic *pundą, from Latin pondō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /puːnd/, /pund/

Noun

pound (plural poundes or pounden or pound)

  1. A measurement for weight, most notably the Tower pound, merchant’s pound or pound avoirdupois, or a weight of said measurement.
  2. A pound or other silver coin (including ancient coins), weighing one Tower pound of silver.
  3. Money or coinage in general, especially a great amount of it.

Descendants

  • English: pound
  • Scots: pund, poond

References

  • “pǒund(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-02-22.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial