beat vs pulse what difference

what is difference between beat and pulse

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pʌls/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /pʌls/, [pəls]
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /pʊls/, /pʌls/

Etymology 1

From Late Middle English pulse, Middle English pous, pouse (regular beat of arteries, pulse; heartbeat; place on the body where a pulse is detectable; beat (of a musical instrument); energy, vitality) [and other forms], from Anglo-Norman puls, pous, pus, and Middle French pouls, poulz, pous [and other forms], Old French pous, pulz (regular beat of arteries; place on the body where a pulse is detectable) (modern French pouls), and from their etymon Latin pulsus (beat, impulse, pulse, stroke; regular beat of arteries or the heart), from pellō (to drive, impel, propel, push; to banish, eject, expel; to set in motion; to strike) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (to beat, strike; to drive; to push, thrust)) + -sus (a variant of -tus (suffix forming action nouns from verbs)).

Noun

pulse (plural pulses)

  1. (physiology)
    1. A normally regular beat felt when arteries near the skin (for example, at the neck or wrist) are depressed, caused by the heart pumping blood through them.
    2. The nature or rate of this beat as an indication of a person’s health.
  2. (figuratively) A beat or throb; also, a repeated sequence of such beats or throbs.
  3. (figuratively) The focus of energy or vigour of an activity, place, or thing; also, the feeling of bustle, busyness, or energy in a place; the heartbeat.
  4. (chiefly biology, chemistry) An (increased) amount of a substance (such as a drug or an isotopic label) given over a short time.
  5. (cooking, chiefly attributively) A setting on a food processor which causes it to work in a series of short bursts rather than continuously, in order to break up ingredients without liquidizing them; also, a use of this setting.
  6. (music, prosody) The beat or tactus of a piece of music or verse; also, a repeated sequence of such beats.
  7. (physics)
    1. A brief burst of electromagnetic energy, such as light, radio waves, etc.
    2. Synonym of autosoliton (a stable solitary localized structure that arises in nonlinear spatially extended dissipative systems due to mechanisms of self-organization)
    3. (also electronics) A brief increase in the strength of an electrical signal; an impulse.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • impulse
  • repulse
  • pulsion
  • pulsive
Translations
See also
  • (physiology): arrhythmia, blood pressure, heartbeat
  • (music, prosody): meter, tempo

Etymology 2

From Late Middle English pulse, Middle English pulsen (to pulse, throb), from Latin pulsāre, the present active infinitive of pulsō (to push; to beat, batter, hammer, strike; to knock on; to pulsate; (figuratively) to drive or urge on, impel; to move; to agitate, disquiet, disturb), the frequentative of pellō (to drive, impel, propel, push; to banish, eject, expel; to set in motion; to strike); see further at etymology 1.

Verb

pulse (third-person singular simple present pulses, present participle pulsing, simple past and past participle pulsed)

  1. (transitive, also figuratively) To emit or impel (something) in pulses or waves.
  2. (transitive, chiefly biology, chemistry) To give to (something, especially a cell culture) an (increased) amount of a substance, such as a drug or an isotopic label, over a short time.
  3. (transitive, cooking) To operate a food processor on (some ingredient) in short bursts, to break it up without liquidizing it.
  4. (transitive, electronics, physics)
    1. To apply an electric current or signal that varies in strength to (something).
    2. To manipulate (an electric current, electromagnetic wave, etc.) so that it is emitted in pulses.
  5. (intransitive, chiefly figuratively and literary) To expand and contract repeatedly, like an artery when blood is flowing though it, or the heart; to beat, to throb, to vibrate, to pulsate.
    Synonym: undulate
  6. (intransitive, figuratively) Of an activity, place, or thing: to bustle with energy and liveliness; to pulsate.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • pulsed (adjective)
  • pulser
  • pulsing (adjective, noun)
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English puls ((collectively) seeds of a leguminous plant used as food; leguminous plants collectively; a species of leguminous plant), Early Middle English pols (in compounds), possibly from Anglo-Norman pus, puz, Middle French pouls, pols, pous, and Old French pous, pou (gruel, mash, porridge) (perhaps in the sense of a gruel made from pulses), or directly from their etymon Latin puls (meal (coarse-ground edible part of various grains); porridge), probably from Ancient Greek πόλτος (póltos, porridge made from flour), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (dust; flour) (perhaps by extension from *pel- (to beat, strike; to drive; to push, thrust), in the sense of something beaten).

Noun

pulse (countable and uncountable, plural pulses)

  1. (uncountable) Annual leguminous plants (such as beans, lentils, and peas) yielding grains or seeds used as food for humans or animals; (countable) such a plant; a legume.
  2. (uncountable) Edible grains or seeds from leguminous plants, especially in a mature, dry condition; (countable) a specific kind of such a grain or seed.
Translations

References

Further reading

  • pulse on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pulse (physics) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pulse (signal processing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pulse (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • legume on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pulse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pulse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Richard DeLone [et al.] (1975), Gary E. Wittlich, editor, Aspects of Twentieth-century Music, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, →ISBN

Anagrams

  • Lepus, Plues, pules, pusle

Dutch

Verb

pulse

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of pulsen

Latin

Participle

pulse

  1. vocative masculine singular of pulsus

Portuguese

Verb

pulse

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of pulsar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of pulsar
  3. first-person singular imperative of pulsar
  4. third-person singular imperative of pulsar

Spanish

Verb

pulse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of pulsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of pulsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of pulsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of pulsar.

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