beat vs round what difference

what is difference between beat and round

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Alternative forms

  • ron (Bermuda)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɹaʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English round, rounde, from Old Northern French röunt, röunde, rund, Old French ront, runt, rëont, rëonde ( > French rond), representing an earlier *rodond, from Latin rotundus or a Vulgar Latin form retundus (compare Italian rotondo, Provençal redon, Spanish redondo, etc.) The noun developed partly from the adjective and partly from the corresponding French noun rond. Compare the doublet rotund and rotunda.

Adjective

round (comparative rounder or more round, superlative roundest or most round)

  1. (physical) Of shape:
    1. Circular or cylindrical; having a circular cross-section in one direction.
    2. Spherical; shaped like a ball; having a circular cross-section in more than one direction.
    3. Lacking sharp angles; having gentle curves.
    4. Plump.
  2. Complete, whole, not lacking.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      Round was their pace at first, but slackened soon.
  3. (of a number) Convenient for rounding other numbers to; for example, ending in a zero.
  4. (phonetics) Pronounced with the lips drawn together; rounded.
  5. Outspoken; plain and direct; unreserved; not mincing.
    • 1867, Matthew Arnold, On the Study of Celtic Literature
      the round assertion
  6. Finished; polished; not defective or abrupt; said of authors or their writing style.
    • 1622, Henry Peacham, The Compleat Gentleman
      In his satires Horace is quick, round, and [] pleasant.
  7. Consistent; fair; just; applied to conduct.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Truth
      Round dealing is the honour of man’s nature.
  8. Large in magnitude.
  9. (authorship, of a fictional character) Well-written and well-characterized; complex and reminiscent of a real person.
    Antonym: flat
  10. (architecture) Vaulted.
Synonyms
  • (circular): circular, cylindrical, discoid
  • (spherical): spherical
  • (of corners that lack sharp angles): rounded
  • (plump): plump, rotund
  • (not lacking): complete, entire, whole
  • (of a number): rounded
  • (pronounced with the lips drawn together): rounded
Derived terms
Related terms
  • Acton Round
Translations

Noun

round (plural rounds)

  1. A circular or spherical object or part of an object.
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber and Faber 2005, page 50:
      All at once the sun was through, a round of dulled silver, racing slantwise through the clouds yet always staying in the same place.
  2. A circular or repetitious route.
  3. A general outburst from a group of people at an event.
  4. A song that is sung by groups of people with each subset of people starting at a different time.
  5. A serving of something; a portion of something to each person in a group.
  6. A single individual portion or dose of medicine.
    • 2009 May 26, Patrick Condon, “Boy with cancer, mom return home”, Associated Press, printed in Austin American-Statesman, page A4:
      Daniel underwent one round of chemotherapy in February but stopped after that single treatment, citing religious beliefs.
  7. One sandwich (two full slices of bread with filling).
  8. (art) A long-bristled, circular-headed paintbrush used in oil and acrylic painting.
  9. A firearm cartridge, bullet, or any individual ammunition projectile. Originally referring to the spherical projectile ball of a smoothbore firearm. Compare round shot and solid shot.
  10. (sports) One of the specified pre-determined segments of the total time of a sport event, such as a boxing or wrestling match, during which contestants compete before being signaled to stop.
    • 2002 April 19, Scott Tobias, Fightville[2], The A.V. Club:
      And though Fightville, an MMA documentary from the directors of the fine Iraq War doc Gunner Palace, presents it more than fairly, the sight of a makeshift ring getting constructed on a Louisiana rodeo ground does little to shake the label. Nor do the shots of ringside assistants with spray bottles and rags, mopping up the blood between rounds
  11. A stage, level, set of events in a game
    1. (sports) A stage in a competition.
    2. (sports) In some sports, e.g. golf or showjumping: one complete way around the course.
    3. (video games) A stage or level of a game.
    4. (card games) The play after each deal.
  12. (engineering, drafting, CAD) A rounded relief or cut at an edge, especially an outside edge, added for a finished appearance and to soften sharp edges.
  13. A strip of material with a circular face that covers an edge, gap, or crevice for decorative, sanitary, or security purposes.
  14. (butchery) The hindquarters of a bovine.
  15. (dated) A rung, as of a ladder.
    • All the rounds like Jacob’s ladder rise.
  16. A crosspiece that joins and braces the legs of a chair.
  17. A series of changes or events ending where it began; a series of like events recurring in continuance; a cycle; a periodical revolution.
  18. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle.
    • c. 1732, George Granville, Women
      Women to cards may be compar’d: we play / A round or two; when us’d, we throw away.
  19. A series of duties or tasks which must be performed in turn, and then repeated.
    Synonym: routine
  20. A circular dance.
  21. Rotation, as in office; succession.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holyday to this entry?)
  22. A general discharge of firearms by a body of troops in which each soldier fires once.
  23. An assembly; a group; a circle.
  24. A brewer’s vessel in which the fermentation is concluded, the yeast escaping through the bunghole.
  25. (archaic) A vessel filled, as for drinking.
  26. (nautical) A round-top.
  27. A round of beef.
Synonyms
  • (song with each subset starting at a different time): canon
  • (hindquarters of a bovine): rump
Antonyms
  • (rounded inside edge): fillet
Hyponyms
  • (song with each subset starting at a different time): catch
Derived terms
  • round of applause
  • round of ammunition
Translations

Preposition

round

  1. (rare in US) Alternative form of around
    • 1782, William Cowper, The Progress of Error
      The serpent Error twines round human hearts.
Derived terms
  • go round
  • look round
Translations

Adverb

round (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of around
Derived terms
  • turnround (from turn round)
Translations

Verb

round (third-person singular simple present rounds, present participle rounding, simple past and past participle rounded)

  1. (transitive) To shape something into a curve.
    The carpenter rounded the edges of the table.
    • The figures on our modern medals are raised and rounded to a very great perfection.
  2. (intransitive) To become shaped into a curve.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      The girl’s figure, he perceived, was admirably proportioned; she was evidently at the period when the angles of childhood were rounding into the promising curves of adolescence.
  3. (with “out”) To finish; to complete; to fill out.
    She rounded out her education with only a single mathematics class.
  4. (intransitive) To approximate a number, especially a decimal number by the closest whole number.
    Ninety-five rounds up to one hundred.
  5. (transitive) To turn past a boundary.
    Helen watched him until he rounded the corner.
  6. (intransitive) To turn and attack someone or something (used with on).
    As a group of policemen went past him, one of them rounded on him, grabbing him by the arm.
  7. (transitive, baseball) To advance to home plate.
    And the runners round the bases on the double by Jones.
  8. (transitive) To go round, pass, go past.
  9. To encircle; to encompass.
    Synonym: surround
  10. To grow round or full; hence, to attain to fullness, completeness, or perfection.
    • So rounds he to a separate mind, / From whence clear memory may begin.
  11. (medicine, colloquial) To do ward rounds.
  12. (obsolete, intransitive) To go round, as a guard; to make the rounds.
  13. (obsolete, intransitive) To go or turn round; to wheel about.
Derived terms
  • round off
  • round out
  • round up
  • round down
Translations

See also

  • ’round

Etymology 2

From Middle English rounen, from Old English rūnian (to whisper, talk low, talk secrets, consipre, talk secretly), from Proto-Germanic *rūnōną (to talk secrets, whisper, decide), *raunijaną (to investigate, examine, prove), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)rewə-, *(e)rwō- (to trace, find out, look out). Cognate with Scots roun (to converse with in whispers, speak privately), Middle Low German rūnen (to whisper), Middle Dutch ruinen (to whisper), German raunen (to whisper, murmur), Old English rūn (whisper, secret, mystery), Swedish röna (to meet with, experience). More at rune.

Verb

round (third-person singular simple present rounds, present participle rounding, simple past and past participle rounded)

  1. (intransitive, archaic or dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To speak in a low tone; whisper; speak secretly; take counsel.
  2. (transitive, archaic or dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To address or speak to in a whisper, utter in a whisper.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
    • c. 1617, David Calderwood (quoted as saying to King James VI)
      The Bishop of Glasgow rounding in his ear, “Ye are not a wise man,” [] he rounded likewise to the bishop, and said, “Wherefore brought ye me here?”
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, I.2.4.IV:
      Tiberius the emperor [] perceiving a fellow round a dead corse in the ear, would needs know wherefore he did so []

Etymology 3

From Middle English roun, from Old English rūn (whisper, secret, mystery), from Proto-Germanic *rūnō, *raunō (a whisper, secret, secret sign), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)rewə-, *(e)rwō- (to trace, find out, look out). Cognate with Scots roun, round (a whisper, secret story), German raunen (to whisper, say secretly), Swedish rön (findings, observations, experience).

Noun

round (plural rounds)

  1. (archaic or dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A whisper; whispering.
  2. (archaic or dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Discourse; song.

Anagrams

  • Duron

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English round.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁund/

Noun

round m (plural rounds)

  1. (sports, chiefly boxing) round
    Synonym: tour

Italian

Etymology

From English round.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrawnd/

Noun

round m (invariable)

  1. (sports) round
  2. round (session or series)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English round.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈraw̃d͡ʒ/

Noun

round m (plural rounds)

  1. (martial arts) round (segment of a fight)
    Synonym: assalto
  2. (figuratively) a stage of a dispute, confrontation or other difficult endeavour

Spanish

Etymology

From English round.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈraund/, [ˈrãũn̪d̪]

Noun

round m (plural rounds)

  1. (martial arts) round

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial