beat vs trounce what difference

what is difference between beat and trounce

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bēt, IPA(key): /biːt/
  • Homophone: beet
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to hit, strike).

Compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)).

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • He, [] with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
  3. (music) A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
    1. (music) The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.
  5. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. (authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.
  8. (by extension) An area of a person’s responsibility, especially
    1. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    2. (journalism) The primary focus of a reporter’s stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
      • 2020 April, Elizabeth Kolbert, Why we won’t avoid a climate catastrophe[2], National Geographic
        As an adult, I became a journalist whose beat is the environment. In a way, I’ve turned my youthful preoccupations into a profession.
  9. (dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.
    • 1898, unknown author, Scribner’s Magazine Volume 24
      It’s a beat on the whole country.
  10. (colloquial, dated) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.
  11. (dated or obsolete, Southern US) A precinct.
  12. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
    1. (Australia) An area frequented by gay men in search of sexual activity. See gay beat.
  13. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
  14. (hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.
    • 1911, Hedley Peek and Frederick George Aflalo, Encyclopaedia of Sport
      Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.
  15. (fencing) A smart tap on the adversary’s blade.
  16. (slang) A makeup look; compare beat one’s face.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Pennsylvania German: biede
Translations
See also
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; strike
    Synonyms: knock, pound, strike, hammer, whack; see also Thesaurus:attack, Thesaurus:hit
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do or be better than; to excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
  9. (transitive, Britain, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    Synonym: negotiate
  10. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
  11. To tread, as a path.
  12. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
  13. To be in agitation or doubt.
  14. To make a sound when struck.
  15. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
  16. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
  17. (transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.
  18. (intransitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: do it, get it on, have sex, shag; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  19. (transitive, slang) To rob.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
  2. dilapidated, beat up
  3. (African-American Vernacular and gay slang) Having impressively attractive makeup
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms
  • (exhausted): See also Thesaurus:fatigued
  • (dilapidated): See also Thesaurus:ramshackle
  • (boring): See also Thesaurus:boring
  • (ugly): See also Thesaurus:ugly
Translations

Etymology 2

From beatnik

Noun

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
    • 2008, David Wills, Beatdom, Issue Three, March 2008
      The beats were pioneers with no destination, changing the world one impulse at a time.
Derived terms
  • beat generation

References

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Bate, Beta, Teba, abet, bate, beta

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin beātus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /beˈat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Adjective

beat (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Derived terms

  • beateria

Noun

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Related terms

  • beatífic

Further reading

  • “beat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “beat” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “beat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “beat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bit/
  • Hyphenation: beat
  • Rhymes: -it
  • Homophones: bied, biedt, biet

Noun

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, a rhythmic pattern, notably in music
  2. (music) beat an early rock genre.

Derived terms

  • beatmis
  • beatmuziek

Anagrams

  • bate

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːt/, [ˈbiːt̪]

Noun

beat

  1. (music) beat

Declension

Synonyms

  • biitti

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English beat.

Adjective

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams

  • beta, tabe

Latin

Verb

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian

Etymology

From a contracted Vulgar Latin form of Late Latin bibitus (drunk), from Latin bibō (drink). Compare Spanish beodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [be̯at]

Adjective

beat m or n (feminine singular beată, masculine plural beți, feminine and neuter plural bete)

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension

Synonyms

  • îmbătat
  • băut

Antonyms

  • treaz

Derived terms

  • beție

Related terms

  • bea
  • bețiv
  • îmbăta

Volapük

Noun

beat (nominative plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /tɹaʊns/
  • Rhymes: -aʊns

Etymology 1

The origin of the verb is unknown; it is perhaps related to Old French troncer, troncher, troncir, tronchir (to cut; to cut a piece from; to retrench), from Old French tronce, tronche (stump; piece of wood). However, the English and Old French words differ in meaning.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

trounce (third-person singular simple present trounces, present participle trouncing, simple past and past participle trounced)

  1. (transitive) To beat severely; to thrash.
  2. (transitive) To beat or overcome thoroughly, to defeat heavily; especially (games, sports) to win against (someone) by a wide margin.
  3. (transitive) To chastise or punish physically or verbally; to scold with abusive language.
    Synonyms: censure, (verbal punishment) rebuke
  4. (transitive, Britain, regional) To punish by bringing a lawsuit against; to sue.
Derived terms
  • trouncer
  • trouncing (noun)
Translations

Noun

trounce (plural trounces)

  1. An act of trouncing: a severe beating, a thrashing; a thorough defeat.
Translations

Etymology 2

The verb is derived from Middle English traunce, trauncen, trancen (to move about (?); to prance (?); to trample the ground) (whence modern English trance with the same senses), possibly either:

  • from Middle English trauncen, transen (to pass from life to death, die), from Old French transir (to cut through, pass through), from Latin trānsīre, present active infinitive of trānseō (to cross, traverse; to go over (to a side or faction); to pass over; to exceed, surpass; of time: to elapse, pass; (figuratively) to cease, pass away), from trāns (across; beyond) + (to go); or
  • a blend of Middle English tramplen (to tread on, trample) + dauncen (to dance) or prauncen (to prance).

The noun is probably derived from the verb.

Verb

trounce (third-person singular simple present trounces, present participle trouncing, simple past and past participle trounced) (Britain, dialectal)

  1. (intransitive) To walk heavily or with some difficulty; to tramp, to trudge.
    Synonym: (obsolete except dialectal) trance
  2. (intransitive) To pass across or over; to traverse.
    Synonym: (obsolete except dialectal) trance
  3. (intransitive) To travel quickly over a long distance.
    Synonym: (obsolete except dialectal) trance

Noun

trounce (plural trounces) (Britain, dialectal)

  1. A walk involving some difficulty or effort; a trek, a tramp, a trudge.
  2. A journey involving quick travel; also, one that is dangerous or laborious.
    Synonym: (obsolete except dialectal) trance

References

  • “TROUNCE, sb. and v.2” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume VI (T–Z, Supplement, Bibliography and Grammar), London: Published by Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1905, →OCLC, page 248, column 1.

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “trounce”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Counter, Cureton, Cutrone, cornute, counter, counter-, countre, recount

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