beautify vs ornament what difference

what is difference between beautify and ornament

English

Etymology

From Middle English beutifien, from Old French beaute (beauty), from Latin bellus (beautiful, fine), + -ify, from Latin facio (make).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbjuː.tɪ.faɪ/

Verb

beautify (third-person singular simple present beautifies, present participle beautifying, simple past and past participle beautified)

  1. (transitive) To make beautiful; to increase the beauty of.
    Synonyms: adorn, decorate, ornament, prettify
    Antonyms: blight, deface, disfigure, mar, uglify
    • 1592, Robert Greene, Greene’s Groats-Worth of Wit, London: William Wright, “Robertoes Tale”[1]
      [] there is an vpstart Crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his Tygers hart wrapt in a Players hyde, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blanke verse as the best of you:
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act V, Scene 3,[2]
      And now, / This ornament [i.e. beard] / Makes me look dismal will I clip to form; / And what this fourteen years no razor touch’d, / To grace thy marriage-day, I’ll beautify.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Persuasion in Northanger Abbey; and Persuasion, London: John Murray, Volume 3, Chapter 5, p. 89,[3]
      [] she was at the other end of the room, beautifying a nosegay;
    • 1909, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Avonlea, Boston: L.C. Page, Chapter 15, p. 171,[4]
      [] I’m so thankful for friendship. It beautifies life so much.”
    • 1954, Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners, London: Longman, p. 109,[5]
      ‘Boy, you take a big chance,’ Moses say. ‘Them pigeons there to beautify the park, not to eat. The people over here will kill you if you touch a fly.’
  2. (intransitive, rare) To become beautiful.
    • 1719, Joseph Addison, Maxims, Observations, and Reflections, London: E. Curll, “Upon the Immortality of the Soul,” p. 88,[6]
      [] it must be a Prospect pleasing to God himself, to see his Creation for ever beautifying in his Eyes, and drawing nearer to him, by greater Degrees of Resemblance.
  3. (intransitive, rare) To make oneself beautiful.
    • 2002, Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones, London: Picador, Chapter 13, p. 156,[7]
      She’d felt silly when she first put cucumbers on her eyes (to diminish puffiness), or oatmeal on her face (to cleanse the pores and absorb excess oils), or egg yolks in her hair (to make it shine). Her use of groceries had even made my mother laugh, then wonder if she should start to beautify.

Related terms

  • beautification
  • beautifier
  • beautifiable
  • beautifying

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English ornament, from Old French ornement, from Latin ornamentum (equipment, apparatus, furniture, trappings, adornment, embellishment), from ornāre, present active infinitive of I equip, adorn. The verb is derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (noun)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɔː(ɹ)nəmənt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹnəmənt/, enPR: ôrʹnə-mənt
  • (verb)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɔː(ɹ)nəmənt/, /ˈɔː(ɹ)nəˌmɛnt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹnəmənt/, /ˈɔɹnəˌmɛnt/, enPR: ôrʹnə-mənt, ôrʹnə-mĕnt’

Noun

ornament (countable and uncountable, plural ornaments)

  1. An element of decoration; that which embellishes or adorns.
  2. A Christmas tree decoration.
  3. (music) A musical flourish that is unnecessary to the overall melodic or harmonic line, but serves to decorate that line.
  4. (Christianity, in the plural) The articles used in church services.
  5. (biology) A characteristic that has a decorative function (typically in order to attract a mate)

Derived terms

  • ornamental

Related terms

  • ornate
  • ornamentation
  • adorn
  • suborn

Translations

Verb

ornament (third-person singular simple present ornaments, present participle ornamenting, simple past and past participle ornamented)

  1. To decorate.
  2. To add to.

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (decorate): adorn, bedeck, decorate, embellish, trim

Translations

Further reading

  • ornament in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • ornament in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin ornamentum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /oɾ.nəˈment/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ur.nəˈmen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /oɾ.naˈment/

Noun

ornament m (plural ornaments)

  1. ornament

Derived terms

  • ornamental

Further reading

  • “ornament” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “ornament” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “ornament” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “ornament” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin ornamentum

Noun

ornament n (definite singular ornamentet, indefinite plural ornament or ornamenter, definite plural ornamenta or ornamentene)

  1. an ornament

Derived terms

  • ornamentikk

References

  • “ornament” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “ornament” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin ornamentum

Noun

ornament n (definite singular ornamentet, indefinite plural ornament, definite plural ornamenta)

  1. an ornament

Derived terms

  • ornamentikk

References

  • “ornament” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From Latin ōrnāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔrˈna.mɛnt/

Noun

ornament m inan

  1. (architecture, art, typography) ornament, adornment
  2. (music) ornament

Declension

Further reading

  • ornament in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ornament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French ornament, from Latin ornamentum.

Noun

ornament n (plural ornamente)

  1. ornament

Declension


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