becharm vs charm what difference

what is difference between becharm and charm

English

Etymology

From Middle English becharmen, bicharmen, equivalent to be- (on, upon) +‎ charm.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)m

Verb

becharm (third-person singular simple present becharms, present participle becharming, simple past and past participle becharmed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To charm; fascinate; hold by a charm or spell.

Derived terms

  • becharming

Anagrams

  • chamber, chambre, chambré


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: chärm, IPA(key): /tʃɑɹm/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: chäm, IPA(key): /tʃɑːm/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)m

Etymology 1

From Middle English charme, from Old French charme (chant, magic spell), from Latin carmen (song, incantation).

Alternative forms

  • charme (obsolete)

Noun

charm (countable and uncountable, plural charms)

  1. An object, act or words believed to have magic power (usually carries a positive connotation).
    Synonyms: incantation, spell, talisman
  2. (often in the plural) The ability to persuade, delight or arouse admiration.
    Synonyms: appeal, attraction, charisma
    Antonyms: boredom, dryness
  3. A small trinket on a bracelet or chain, etc., traditionally supposed to confer luck upon the wearer.
    Synonyms: amulet, dangle, ornament
  4. (particle physics) A quantum number of hadrons determined by the number of charm quarks and antiquarks.
    Coordinate term: strangeness
  5. (finance) A second-order measure of derivative price sensitivity, expressed as the instantaneous rate of change of delta with respect to time.
    Synonyms: delta decay, DdeltaDtime
    Hypernym: Greeks
Translations

Verb

charm (third-person singular simple present charms, present participle charming, simple past and past participle charmed)

  1. To seduce, persuade or fascinate someone or something.
    Synonyms: delight, enchant, entrance
  2. (transitive) To use a magical charm upon; to subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence.
    Synonyms: bewitch, enchant, ensorcel, enspell
  3. To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences.
  4. (obsolete, rare) To make music upon.
  5. To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Variant of chirm, from Middle English chirme, from Old English ċierm (cry, alarm), from Proto-Germanic *karmiz.

Noun

charm (plural charms)

  1. The mixed sound of many voices, especially of birds or children.
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber and Faber 2005, p. 152:
      The laughter rose like the charm of starlings.
  2. A flock, group (especially of finches).

Further reading

  • charm (quantum number) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • charm quark on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • March, march

Chinese

Etymology

Shortened from English charming.

Pronunciation

Adjective

charm

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, usually of a male) charming (clarification of this definition is needed)

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English charm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɕɑːm]

Noun

charm c (singular definite charmen, plural indefinite charms)

  1. charm (jewelry)
Inflection

Etymology 2

See charme (to charm).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɕɑˀm]

Verb

charm

  1. imperative of charme

Palauan

Noun

charm

  1. animal

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɧarm/

Noun

charm c

  1. charm; the ability to persuade, delight, or arouse admiration

Declension

Related terms

  • charma
  • charmant
  • charmera
  • charmig
  • charmerande
  • charmör

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