bedeck vs deck what difference

what is difference between bedeck and deck

English

Etymology

From be- +‎ deck. Compare West Frisian bedekke (to cover), Dutch bedekken (to cover, coat, overlay), German bedecken (to cover, top, overlay), Swedish betäcka (to cover, shelter). Doublet of bethatch.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɪˈdɛk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Verb

bedeck (third-person singular simple present bedecks, present participle bedecking, simple past and past participle bedecked)

  1. (transitive) To deck, ornament, or adorn; to grace.

Translations

Anagrams

  • becked

German

Pronunciation

Verb

bedeck

  1. singular imperative of bedecken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of bedecken


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛk
  • Homophone: deque

Etymology 1

From Middle English dekke, borrowed from Middle Dutch dec (roof, covering), from Middle Dutch decken, from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjaną. Formed the same: German Decke (covering, blanket). Doublet of thatch and thack.

Noun

deck (plural decks)

  1. Any raised flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.
  2. (nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
  3. (aviation) A main aeroplane surface, especially of a biplane or multiplane.
  4. (card games) A pack or set of playing cards.
  5. (card games, by extension) A set of cards owned by each individual player and from which they draw when playing.
    Synonym: library
  6. (journalism) A headline consisting of one or more actual lines of text.
    • 2005, Richard Keeble, Print Journalism: A Critical Introduction (page 114)
      If there’s a strapline or subdeck, write these after the main deck and don’t use the same words.
  7. A set of slides for a presentation.
    • 2011, David Kroenke, Donald Nilson, Office 365 in Business
      Navigate to the location where your PowerPoint deck is stored and select it.
  8. (obsolete) A heap or store.
    • 1655, Philip Massinger, The Guardian, Act III, scene iii:
      A paper-blurrer, who on all occasions, / For all times, and all season, hath such trinkets / Ready in the deck
  9. (slang) A folded paper used for distributing illicit drugs.
    • 2007, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New Jersey (volume 188)
      Defendant placed the decks in his pocket and, after driving out of the city, gave one to Shore. While still in the car, Shore snorted half of the deck. When they returned to defendant’s home, defendant handed Shore a second deck of heroin.
  10. (slang) The floor.
    We hit the deck as bullets began to fly.
  11. (theater) The stage.
  12. Short for tape deck.
    • 1985, Byte (volume 10, page 111)
      The general operating procedure for recording a tape is basically the same as for playing it. After you insert the tape in the deck, you fast forward it to the end and then completely rewind it.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
  2. (informal) To knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.
    Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?
  3. (card games) To cause a player to run out of cards to draw, usually making them lose the game.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English dekken, from Middle Dutch dekken (to cover), from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjaną (to roof; cover).

Verb

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out) To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3 Act III, Scene ii:
      And deck my body in gay ornaments, / And witch sweet ladies with my words and looks.
    • 1919, William Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 39
      They call beautiful a dress, a dog, a sermon; and when they are face to face with Beauty cannot recognise it. The false emphasis with which they try to deck their worthless thoughts blunts their susceptibilities.
  2. (transitive, sometimes with out) To decorate (something).
    • 1700, John Dryden (tr.), “The Flower and the Leaf”:
      (now the dew with spangles decked the ground)
  3. (transitive) To cover; to overspread.
Usage notes
  • See deck out
Derived terms
  • bedeck
Translations

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [dɛk]

Verb

deck

  1. singular imperative of decken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of decken

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English deck.

Noun

deck m (invariable)

  1. tape deck

Luxembourgish

Verb

deck

  1. second-person singular imperative of decken

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial