bedevil vs torment what difference

what is difference between bedevil and torment

English

Etymology

be- +‎ devil

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): [bɪˈdɛvəɫ]

Verb

bedevil (third-person singular simple present bedevils, present participle bedeviling or bedevilling, simple past and past participle bedeviled or bedevilled)

  1. To harass or cause trouble for; to plague.
    Guerrilla attacks continued to bedevil the larger army’s supply routes.
  2. To perplex or bewilder.

Usage notes

  • The spellings bedeviling and bedeviled are preferred in the US, while bedevilling and bedevilled are preferred in the UK. However, the choice of spellings is not universal.

Translations

Anagrams

  • b’lieved, believ’d, beviled


English

Etymology

From Middle English torment, from Old French torment, from Latin tormentum (something operated by twisting), from torquere (to twist).

Pronunciation

  • (noun) IPA(key): /ˈtɔː(ɹ)mɛnt/
  • (verb) IPA(key): /tɔː(ɹ)ˈmɛnt/

Noun

torment (countable and uncountable, plural torments)

  1. (obsolete) A catapult or other kind of war-engine.
  2. Torture, originally as inflicted by an instrument of torture.
  3. Any extreme pain, anguish or misery, either physical or mental.
    He was bitter from the torments of the divorce.
    • They brought unto him all sick people that were taken with divers diseases and torments.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:pain

Derived terms

  • tormentous

Translations

Verb

torment (third-person singular simple present torments, present participle tormenting, simple past and past participle tormented)

  1. (transitive) To cause severe suffering to (stronger than to vex but weaker than to torture.)
    The child tormented the flies by pulling their wings off.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, “Man City 4-1 Man Utd”, BBC Sport, 22 September 2013:
      Moyes, who never won a derby at Liverpool in 11 years as Everton manager, did not find the Etihad any more forgiving as City picked United apart in midfield, where Toure looked in a different class to United’s £27.5m new boy Marouane Fellaini, and in defence as Aguero tormented Nemanja Vidic and Rio Ferdinand.

Derived terms

  • tormentor

Translations


Middle English

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French torment, from Latin tormentum.

Noun

torment (plural torments)

  1. torment (suffering, pain)

Descendants

  • English: torment

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • tourment

Etymology

From Old French torment, from Latin tormentum.

Noun

torment m (plural torments)

  1. torment; suffering; anguish

Old French

Alternative forms

  • turment

Etymology

From Latin tormentum.

Noun

torment m (oblique plural tormenz or tormentz, nominative singular tormenz or tormentz, nominative plural torment)

  1. torture
  2. (figuratively, by extension) suffering; torment

Descendants

  • Middle English: torment (borrowing)
    • English: torment
  • Middle French: torment, tourment
    • French: tourment

References

  • “tourment” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin tormentum.

Noun

torment m (nominative singular torments)

  1. suffering; torment

Descendants

  • Catalan: turment
  • Occitan: torment

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