beef vs crab what difference

what is difference between beef and crab

English

Etymology

From Middle English beef, bef, beof, borrowed from Anglo-Norman beof, Old French buef, boef (ox) (modern French bœuf); from Latin bōs (ox), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷṓws.

Beef in the sense of “a grudge, argument” was originally an American slang expression:

  • attested as a verb “to complain” in 1888: “He’ll beef an’ kick like a steer an’ let on he won’t never wear ’em.”— New York World, 13 May;
  • attested as a noun “complaint, protest, grievance, sim.” in 1899: “He made a Horrible Beef because he couldn’t get Loaf Sugar for his Coffee.”—Fables in Slang (1900) by George Ade, page 80.

As to the possible origin of this American usage, it has been suggested that it can be traced back to a British expression for “alarm”, first recorded in 1725: “BEEF ‘to alarm, as To cry beef upon us; they have discover’d us, and are in Pursuit of us”. The term “beef” in this context would be a Cockney rhyming slang of thief. The continuous use of a similar expression, including its assumed semantic shift to ‘complaint’ in the United States from the 1880s onwards, needs further clarification though.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bif/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /biːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Noun

beef (countable and uncountable, plural beef or beefs or beeves)

  1. (uncountable) The meat from a cow, bull, or other bovine.
    Synonyms: cowflesh, oxflesh
    Hyponym: veal
    1. (in the meat industry, on product packaging) The edible portions of a cow (including those which are not meat).
    2. (by extension, slang, uncountable) Muscle or musculature; size, strength or potency.
    3. (figuratively, slang, uncountable) Essence, content; the important part of a document or project.
      Synonym: meat
  2. (uncountable) Bovine animals.
  3. (archaic, countable, plural: beeves) A single bovine (cow or bull) being raised for its meat.
  4. (slang, countable or uncountable, plural: beefs) A grudge; dislike (of something or someone); lack of faith or trust (in something or someone); a reason for a dislike or grudge. (often + with)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bovine

Translations

See also

  • beefwood

Verb

beef (third-person singular simple present beefs, present participle beefing, simple past and past participle beefed)

  1. (intransitive) To complain.
  2. (transitive) To add weight or strength to.
    Synonym: beef up
    • 1969, Hot Rod (volume 22, page 59)
      First off, the axle housing was beefed by welding areas where extreme loading is evident (black marked areas).
  3. (intransitive, slang) To fart; break wind.
  4. (African-American Vernacular, intransitive, slang) To feud or hold a grudge against.
  5. (intransitive, chiefly Yorkshire) To cry.
  6. (transitive, slang) To fail or mess up.

Derived terms

  • beef up
  • beef out

Adjective

beef (not comparable)

  1. Being a bovine animal that is being raised for its meat.
  2. Producing or known for raising lots of beef.
  3. Consisting of or containing beef as an ingredient.

Related terms

  • beefy

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Feeb, feeb

Afrikaans

Verb

beef (present beef, present participle bewende, past participle gebeef)

  1. Alternative form of bewe

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eːf

Verb

beef

  1. first-person singular present indicative of beven
  2. imperative of beven


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kɹæb/, enPR: krăb
  • Rhymes: -æb

Etymology 1

From Middle English crabbe, from Old English crabba (crab; crayfish; cancer), from Proto-West Germanic *krabbō, from Proto-Germanic *krabbô, from *krabbōną (to creep, crawl), from Proto-Indo-European *grobʰ- (scratch, claw at), a variant of *gerebʰ-. More at carve.

Noun

crab (countable and uncountable, plural crabs)

  1. A crustacean of the infraorder Brachyura, having five pairs of legs, the foremost of which are in the form of claws, and a carapace.
  2. (uncountable) The meat of this crustacean, served as food; crabmeat.
  3. A bad-tempered person.
  4. (in plural crabs, informal) An infestation of pubic lice (Pthirus pubis).
  5. (uncountable, aviation) The angle by which an aircraft’s nose is pointed upwind of its groundtrack to compensate for crosswinds during an approach to landing.
  6. (slang) A playing card with the rank of three.
  7. (rowing) A position in rowing where the oar is pushed under the rigger by the force of the water.
  8. A defect in an outwardly normal object that may render it inconvenient and troublesome to use.
    • 1915, W.S. Maugham, Of Human Bondage, chapter 116
      — “I suppose you wouldn’t like to do a locum for a month on the South coast? Three guineas a week with board and lodging.” — “I wouldn’t mind,” said Philip. — “It’s at Farnley, in Dorsetshire. Doctor South. You’d have to go down at once; his assistant has developed mumps. I believe it’s a very pleasant place.” There was something in the secretary’s manner that puzzled Philip. It was a little doubtful. — “What’s the crab in it?” he asked.
    • 1940, Horace Annesley Vachell, Little Tyrannies
      Arrested by the low price of another “desirable residence”, I asked “What’s the crab?” The agent assured me that there was no crab. I fell in love with this house at sight. Happily, I discovered that it was reputed to be haunted.
  9. (dated) An unsold book that is returned to the publisher.
    • 1844, Albert Henry Payne, Payne’s universum, or pictorial world (page 99)
      [] the unsold copies may be returned to the original publisher , at a period fixed upon between Christmas and Easter; these returned copies are technically called krebse or crabs, probably, from their walking backwards. [] A says to B, “I have had eight thousand dollars’ worth of your publications, three thousand were crabs, that makes five thousand.”
    • 1892, The Publishers Weekly (volume 41, page 709)
      [] unsold copies and settling the yearly accounts; while for the publisher begins the much dreaded season of “crabs,” as []
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

crab (third-person singular simple present crabs, present participle crabbing, simple past and past participle crabbed)

  1. (intransitive) To fish for crabs.
  2. (transitive, US, slang) To ruin.
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010, p. 224:
      ‘Just so we understand each other,’ he said after a pause. ‘If you crab this case, you’ll be in a jam.’
  3. (intransitive) To complain.
  4. (transitive) To complain about.
  5. (intransitive) To drift or move sideways or to leeward (by analogy with the movement of a crab).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
  6. To move in a manner that involves keeping low and clinging to surfaces.
  7. (transitive, aviation) To navigate (an aircraft, e.g. a glider) sideways against an air current in order to maintain a straight-line course.
  8. (transitive, film, television) To move (a camera) sideways.
    • 1997, Paul Kriwaczek, Documentary for the Small Screen (page 109)
      If panning is not easy to make seem natural, crabbing the camera is even less like any action we perform with our eyes in the real world. There are a few circumstances in which we walk sideways: []
  9. (obsolete, World War I), to fly slightly off the straight-line course towards an enemy aircraft, as the machine guns on early aircraft did not allow firing through the propeller disk.
  10. (rare) To back out of something.
Derived terms
  • crabber
  • crabbing

Etymology 2

From Middle English crabbe (wild apple), of Germanic origin, plausibly from North Germanic, cognate with Swedish dialect scrabba.

Noun

crab (plural crabs)

  1. The crab apple or wild apple.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, act 2 scene 2
      I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
      And I with my long nails will dig thee pig-nuts;
  2. The tree bearing crab apples, which has a dogbane-like bitter bark with medical use.
  3. A cudgel made of the wood of the crab tree; a crabstick.
    • 1741, David Garrick, The Lying Valet
      She swore to such things , that I could do nothing but swear and call names : upon which out bolts her husband upon me , with a fine taper crab in his hand and fell upon me with such violence , that , being half delirious , I made a full confession
  4. A movable winch or windlass with powerful gearing, used with derricks, etc.
  5. A form of windlass, or geared capstan, for hauling ships into dock, etc.
  6. A machine used in ropewalks to stretch the yarn.
  7. A claw for anchoring a portable machine.
Synonyms
  • (crab apple): crab apple
  • (tree): crab apple
Derived terms

Verb

crab (third-person singular simple present crabs, present participle crabbing, simple past and past participle crabbed)

  1. (obsolete) To irritate, make surly or sour
  2. To be ill-tempered; to complain or find fault.
  3. (British dialect) To cudgel or beat, as with a crabstick
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Possibly a corruption of the genus name Carapa

Noun

crab (plural crabs)

  1. The tree species Carapa guianensis, native to South America.
Derived terms
  • crab-nut
  • crab oil

Etymology 4

From carabiner.

Noun

crab (plural crabs)

  1. (informal) Short for carabiner.

References

  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. →ISBN
  • Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary of the English Language. International Edition. combined with Britannica World Language Dictionary. Chicago-London etc., Encyclopaedia Britannica, inc., 1965.

Anagrams

  • BRAC, RBAC, carb, carb-, cbar

Middle English

Etymology 1

Inherited from Old English crabba.

Noun

crab

  1. Alternative form of crabbe (crab)

Etymology 2

Of Germanic origin, plausibly from North Germanic.

Noun

crab

  1. Alternative form of crabbe (crabapple)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French crabe.

Noun

crab m (plural crabi)

  1. crab

Declension

See also

  • crevetă
  • homar
  • rac

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