beehive vs hive what difference

what is difference between beehive and hive

English

Alternative forms

  • bee-hive

Etymology

From Middle English beehyve, equivalent to bee +‎ hive.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːhaɪv/

Noun

beehive (plural beehives)

  1. An enclosed structure in which some species of honey bees (genus Apis) live and raise their young.
    Synonyms: hive, skep
  2. A man-made structure in which bees are kept for their honey.
    Synonyms: hive, apiary
  3. (figuratively) Any place full of activity, or in which people are very busy.
    Synonym: hive of activity
  4. A women’s hairstyle, popular in the 1960s, in which long hair is styled into a hive-shaped form on top of the head and usually held in place with lacquer.
    Synonym: B-52
  5. A particular style of hat.
  6. A type of anti-personnel ammunition round containing flechettes, and characterised by the buzzing sound made as they fly through the air.
    • 2005, Martin Torgoff, Can’t Find My Way Home (Simon & Schuster 2005, page 179)
      By the time it was over, Stone had been blown thirty feet through the air by a beehive round as he was running across a field, knocked out by the concussion of the blast.
  7. (nonstandard, New Zealand) Alternative form of Beehive
  8. (cellular automata) In Conway’s Game of Life, a particular still life configuration with a rounded appearance.

Derived terms

  • beehive quern

Related terms

  • bee
  • hive

Translations

Verb

beehive (third-person singular simple present beehives, present participle beehiving, simple past and past participle beehived)

  1. (rare, transitive) To fill (a place) with busy activity.
    • 1958, T. S. Bawa, Jawaharlal Nehru, Nehru’s India: An Analytical Study (page 25)
      Quite naturally, if there are more ministers swarming the cabinet rooms and conference halls, then there will be a spate of civil servants beehiving the secretariat.

See also

  • apiary
  • beekeeper
  • skep

Further reading

  • Beehive (beekeeping) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia (the man-made structures)
  • Beehive (hairstyle) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • hive bee


English

Etymology

From Middle English hyve, from Old English hȳf, from Proto-West Germanic *hūfi (compare Dutch huif (beehive), Danish dialect huv (ship’s hull)), from Proto-Indo-European *kuHp- (water vessel) (compare Latin cūpa (tub, vat), Ancient Greek κύπη (kúpē, gap, hole), κύπελλον (kúpellon, beaker), Sanskrit कूप (kū́pa, cave)), from *kew- (to bend, curve). The computing term was chosen as an in-joke relating to bees; see [1].

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv

Noun

hive (plural hives)

  1. A structure, whether artificial or natural, for housing a swarm of honeybees.
    • IV.10-13:
      First, for thy Bees a quiet Station find,
      And lodge ’em under Covert of the Wind:
      For Winds, when homeward they return, will drive
      The loaded Carriers from their Ev’ning Hive.
  2. The bees of one hive; a swarm of bees.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida, Act I, Scene iii:
      When that the general is not like the hive, to whom the foragers shall all repair, what honey is expected?
  3. A place swarming with busy occupants; a crowd.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Boadicea
      There the hive of Roman liars worship a gluttonous emperor-idiot.
  4. (computing, Microsoft Windows) A section of the registry.
    • 2011, Samuel Phung, Professional Microsoft Windows Embedded CE 6.0
      For devices built with hive-based registry implementation, the registry data are broken into three different hives — the boot hive, system hive, and user hive.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • apiary
  • hives

Verb

hive (third-person singular simple present hives, present participle hiving, simple past and past participle hived)

  1. (intransitive, entomology) To enter or possess a hive.
  2. (intransitive) To form a hive-like entity.
  3. (transitive) To collect into a hive.
    to hive a swarm of bees
  4. (transitive) To store in a hive or similarly.
  5. (intransitive) To take shelter or lodgings together; to reside in a collective body.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene v[2]:
      SHYLOCK:
      The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder,
      Snail-slow in profit, and he sleeps by day
      More than the wild-cat; drones hive not with me;
      Therefore I part with him; and part with him
      To one what I would have him help to waste
      His borrowed purse. []
    • 1725, Alexander Pope, letter to Martha Blount
      [] to get into warmer houses, and hive together in cities

Derived terms

  • hive off

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hiva (a infinitive)

Etymology

From English heave, from Middle English heven, hebben, from Old English hebban, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to take up, lift). Doublet of hevja.

Verb

hive (present tense hiv, past tense heiv, past participle hive, present participle hivande, imperative hiv)

  1. (transitive) to lift, heave, tow
  2. (transitive) to throw

References

  • “hive” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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