Beggar vs Begger what difference

what is difference between Beggar and Begger

English

Alternative forms

  • begger (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English beggere, beggare, beggar (beggar), from Middle English beggen (to beg), equivalent to beg +‎ -ar.

Alternative etymology derives Middle English beggere, beggare, beggar from Old French begart, originally a member of the Beghards, a lay brotherhood of mendicants in the Low Countries, from Middle Dutch beggaert (mendicant), with pejorative suffix (see -ard); the order is said to be named after the priest Lambert le Bègue of Liège (French for “Lambert the Stammerer”).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɛɡɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɛɡə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡə(ɹ)

Noun

beggar (plural beggars)

  1. A person who begs.
    • 1983, Stanley Rosen, Plato’s Sophist: The Drama of Original & Image, St. Augustine’s Press, p. 62:
      Odysseus has returned to his home disguised as a beggar.
  2. A person suffering from extreme poverty.
  3. (colloquial, sometimes endearing) A mean or wretched person; a scoundrel.
    What does that silly beggar think he’s doing?
  4. (Britain) A minced oath for bugger.

Synonyms

  • (who begs): mendicant, panhandler, schnorrer, spanger, truant, see also Thesaurus:beggar
  • (extremely poor person): palliard, pauper, vagabond, see also Thesaurus:pauper

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

beggar (third-person singular simple present beggars, present participle beggaring, simple past and past participle beggared)

  1. (transitive) To make a beggar of someone; impoverish.
  2. (transitive) To exhaust the resources of; to outdo.

Synonyms

  • ruin

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • bagger


English

Etymology

beg +‎ -er

Noun

begger (plural beggers)

  1. Obsolete form of beggar.

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