begin vs start what difference

what is difference between begin and start

English

Etymology

From Middle English beginnen, from Old English beginnan (to begin), from Proto-Germanic *biginnaną (to begin) (q.v.), from be- + base verb *ginnaną also found in Old English onginnan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪˈɡɪn/, /bəˈɡɪn/, /biˈɡɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Verb

begin (third-person singular simple present begins, present participle beginning, simple past began, past participle begun)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To start, to initiate or take the first step into something.
  2. (intransitive) To be in the first stage of some situation
  3. (intransitive) To come into existence.

Synonyms

  • commence
  • initiate
  • start

Derived terms

  • beginning
  • beginner

Translations

Noun

begin (plural begins)

  1. (nonstandard) Beginning; start.

References

  • begin in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • begin in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Bengi, being, beïng, binge

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈɣɪn/
  • Hyphenation: be‧gin
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch begin, from Old Dutch *bigin, *bigen, from Proto-Germanic *biginnaz (beginning), from Proto-Germanic *biginniną (to begin). Compare Old Dutch anagen, anagenni (beginning).

Noun

begin n (uncountable, diminutive beginnetje n)

  1. start, beginning
Synonyms
  • aanvang
  • start
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: begin

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

begin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of beginnen
  2. imperative of beginnen

Anagrams

  • benig

Middle Dutch

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

begin n

  1. beginning, start
  2. origin, source

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: begin
  • Limburgish: begin

Further reading

  • “beghin (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “begin”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Volapük

Noun

begin (nominative plural begins)

  1. beginning

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɑːt/
  • (General American) enPR: stärt, IPA(key): /stɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Etymology 1

From Middle English stert, from the verb sterten (to start, startle). See below.

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. The beginning of an activity.
    The movie was entertaining from start to finish.
  2. A sudden involuntary movement.
    He woke with a start.
    • 1885, Robert Louis Stevenson, Olalla
      The sight of his scared face, his starts and pallors and sudden harkenings, unstrung me []
  3. The beginning point of a race, a board game, etc.
    Captured pieces are returned to the start of the board.
  4. An appearance in a sports game, horserace, etc., from the beginning of the event.
    Jones has been a substitute before, but made his first start for the team last Sunday.
  5. (horticulture) A young plant germinated in a pot to be transplanted later.
    • 2009, Liz Primeau, Steven A. Frowine, Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies
      You generally see nursery starts at garden centres in mid to late spring. Small annual plants are generally sold in four-packs or larger packs, with each cell holding a single young plant.
  6. An initial advantage over somebody else; a head start.
    to get, or have, the start
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Start
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sterten (to leap up suddenly, rush out), from Old English styrtan (to leap up, start), from Proto-West Germanic *sturtijan (to startle, move, set in motion), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ter- (to be stiff). Cognate with Old Frisian stirta (to fall down, tumble), Middle Dutch sterten (to rush, fall, collapse) (Dutch storten), Old High German sturzen (to hurl, plunge, turn upside down) (German stürzen), Old High German sterzan (to be stiff, protrude). More at stare.

Verb

start (third-person singular simple present starts, present participle starting, simple past and past participle started)

  1. (transitive) To begin, commence, initiate.
    1. To set in motion.
      • April 2, 1716, Joseph Addison, Freeholder No. 30
        I was some years ago engaged in conversation with a fashionable French Abbe, upon a subject which the people of that kingdom love to start in discourse.
    2. To begin.
    3. To initiate operation of a vehicle or machine.
    4. To put or raise (a question, an objection); to put forward (a subject for discussion).
    5. To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent.
      • 1674, William Temple, letter to The Countess of Essex
        Sensual men agree in the pursuit of every pleasure they can start.
  2. (intransitive) To begin an activity.
  3. (intransitive) To have its origin (at), begin.
  4. To startle or be startled; to move or be moved suddenly.
    1. (intransitive) To jerk suddenly in surprise.
      • I start as from some dreadful dream.
      • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
        Keep your soul to the work when it is ready to start aside.
      • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXXI:
        […] The tempest’s mocking elf / Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf / He strikes on, only when the timbers start.
    2. (intransitive) To awaken suddenly.
    3. (transitive) To disturb and cause to move suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly.
      • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act I, Scene i[2]:
        […]Upon malicious bravery dost thou come / To start my quiet?
    4. (transitive) To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate.
      • 1676, Richard Wiseman, Severall Chirurgical Treatises
        One, by a fall in wrestling, started the end of the clavicle from the sternon.
  5. (intransitive) To break away, to come loose.
  6. (transitive, sports) To put into play.
    • 2010, Brian Glanville, The Story of the World Cup: The Essential Companion to South Africa 2010, London: Faber and Faber, →ISBN, page 361:
      The charge against Zagallo then is not so much that he started Ronaldo, but that when it should surely have been clear that the player was in no fit state to take part he kept him on.
  7. (transitive, nautical) To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from.
  8. (intransitive, euphemistic) To start one’s periods (menstruation).
Usage notes
  • In uses 1.1 and 1.2 this is a catenative verb that takes the infinitive (to) or the gerund (-ing) form. There is no change in meaning.
  • For more information, see Appendix:English catenative verbs
Antonyms
  • stop
  • end
Derived terms
  • astart
  • start-up
  • starter
Descendants
  • Dutch: starten
  • German: starten
  • Norman: stèrter
  • French: starter
  • Icelandic: starta
  • Faroese: starta
  • Norwegian Bokmål: starte
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: starta
  • Swedish: starta
  • Danish: starte
  • Slovak: štartovať
Translations

See also

Etymology 3

From Middle English stert, start, from Old English steort, stert, from Proto-Germanic *stertaz (tail). Cognate with Dutch staart (tail), German Sterz (tail, handle), Swedish stjärt (tail, arse).

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. A tail, or anything projecting like a tail.
  2. A handle, especially that of a plough.
  3. The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water wheel bucket.
  4. The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse.

Derived terms

  1. redstart

Anagrams

  • Strat, Tarts, strat, tarts

Breton

Adjective

start

  1. firm, strong
  2. difficult

Derived terms

  • startijenn

Further reading

  • Herve Ar Bihan, Colloquial Breton, pages 16 and 268: define “start” as “hard, difficult, firm”

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start

  1. start

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[3], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈstart]

Noun

start m

  1. start (beginning point of a race)

Declension

Related terms

  • připravit se, pozor, start

See also

  • cíl m

Further reading

  • start in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • start in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start c (singular definite starten, plural indefinite starter)

  1. start

Inflection

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/
  • Hyphenation: start
  • Rhymes: -ɑrt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (plural starts, diminutive startje n)

  1. start
Derived terms
  • pikstart
  • startbaan
  • starten
  • startpunt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

start

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of starten
  2. imperative of starten

German

Verb

start

  1. singular imperative of starten

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural starter, definite plural startene)

  1. a start
Derived terms
  • omstart
  • startsted

Etymology 2

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

References

  • “start” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural startar, definite plural startane)

  1. a start (beginning)

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starta

Derived terms

  • omstart

References

  • “start” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /start/

Noun

start m inan

  1. (sports) start (the beginning of a race)
  2. (aviation) takeoff
    Z niecierpliwością czekałam na start samolotu do Paryża.

    I was impatiently waiting for the plane to Paris to take off. (=for its take-off)
  3. participation
    Większość kibiców ucieszyła się, że zdecydował się on na start w zawodach.

    Most fans were happy to hear that he had decided to take part in the competition.

Declension

Derived terms

  • startować (to start, verb)
  • startowy (tarting, take-off, adjective)
  • falstart m (false start, noun)

Further reading

  • start in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

Noun

start c

  1. a start; a beginning (of a race)
  2. the starting (of an engine)

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • starta
  • starter
  • startare

References

  • start in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Anagrams

  • ratts, trast

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [staɾt]
  • Hyphenation: start

Noun

start (definite accusative startı, plural startlar)

  1. start

Usage notes

As Turks are generally not easily spelling consonants at the beginning of a syllable, this word may often be spelled as [sɯtaɾt].

Declension

Antonyms

  • finiş

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