beginner vs initiate what difference

what is difference between beginner and initiate

English

Etymology

From Middle English begynner, equivalent to begin +‎ -er. Cognate with West Frisian begjinner (beginner), Dutch beginner (beginner), Danish nybegynder (beginner, novice).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɪˈɡɪnə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bəˈɡɪnɚ/

Noun

beginner (plural beginners)

  1. Someone who is just starting at something, or has only recently started.
  2. Someone who sets something in motion.
  3. (theater) An actor who is present on stage in the first moments of a play.
    • 1949, Walter Macqueen-Pope, ‎Gaiety: Theatre of Enchantment (page 60)
      On the stage, the beginners for the first piece had taken their places — the chorus were there, scared but determined, and in the wings waited Harlequin, in the person of Charles Lyall []

Synonyms

  • (recent starter): amateur, newbie
  • See also Thesaurus:beginner

Derived terms

  • beginnerish
  • beginner’s trap

Translations

Further reading

  • beginner in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • beginner in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • benigner, bergenin

Dutch

Etymology

From beginnen +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈɣɪnər/
  • Hyphenation: be‧gin‧ner
  • Rhymes: -ɪnər

Noun

beginner m (plural beginners, diminutive beginnertje n)

  1. Someone who is just starting something, or has only recently started (similar to English)

Derived terms

  • beginnerscursus


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin initiātus, perfect passive participle of initiō (begin, originate), from initium (a beginning), from ineō (go in, enter upon, begin), from in + (go).

Pronunciation

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ɪˈnɪʃ.ɪ.eɪt/
  • (noun, adjective) IPA(key): /ɪˈnɪʃ.ɪ.ət/
  • Hyphenation: ini‧ti‧ate

Noun

initiate (plural initiates)

  1. A new member of an organization.
  2. One who has been through a ceremony of initiation.

Translations

Verb

initiate (third-person singular simple present initiates, present participle initiating, simple past and past participle initiated)

  1. (transitive) To begin; to start.
    • 1859-1860, Isaac Taylor, Ultimate Civilisation
      How are changes of this sort to be initiated?
  2. To instruct in the rudiments or principles; to introduce.
    • 1653-1655, Henry More, An Antidote against Atheism
      Divine Providence would only initiate and enter mankind into the useful knowledge of her, leaving the rest to employ our industry.
    • to initiate his pupil in any part of learning
  3. To confer membership on; especially, to admit to a secret order with mysterious rites or ceremonies.
    • 1738-1741, William Warburton, Divine Legation of Moses demonstrated on the Principles of a Religious Deist
      The Athenians believed that he who was initiated and instructed in the mysteries would obtain celestial honour after death.
    • He was initiated into half a dozen clubs before he was one and twenty.
  4. (intransitive) To do the first act; to perform the first rite; to take the initiative.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Pope to this entry?)

Antonyms

  • (to begin): end, conclude, complete, finish

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

initiate (comparative more initiate, superlative most initiate)

  1. (obsolete) Unpractised; untried; new.
  2. (obsolete) Begun; commenced; introduced to, or instructed in, the rudiments; newly admitted.

Further reading

  • initiate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • initiate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • initiate at OneLook Dictionary Search

Latin

Participle

initiāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of initiātus

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