belch vs bubble what difference

what is difference between belch and bubble

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɛltʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛltʃ

Etymology

From Middle English belchen, from Old English bielċan, from Proto-Germanic *balkijaną, *belkaną, probably ultimately of imitative origin.

Related to Dutch balken (to bray), Middle Low German belken (to shout), Low German bölken (to shout, bark), Old English bealċettan (to utter, send forth). See also English bolk, boak.

Verb

belch (third-person singular simple present belches, present participle belching, simple past and past participle belched)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To expel (gas) loudly from the stomach through the mouth.
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act III, Scene 4, [1]
      ‘Tis not a year or two shows us a man:
      They are all but stomachs, and we all but food;
      To eat us hungerly, and when they are full,
      They belch us.
    • 1746, attributed to Jonathan Swift, “A Love Poem form a Physician to his Mistress,” [2]
      When I an amorous kiss design’d,
      I belch’d a hurricane of wind.
    • 1980, J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians, Penguin, 19982, Chapter 2, p. 41,
      She eats too fast, belches behind a cupped hand, smiles.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To eject or emit (something) with spasmodic force or noise.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 10, lines 230-33, [3]
      Within the gates of hell sat Sin and Death,
      In counterview within the gates, that now
      Stood open wide, belching outrageous flame
      Far into Chaos [] .
    • 1697, Virgil, Aeneid, translated by John Dryden, Book VIII, [4]
      Vulcan this plague begot; and, like his sire,
      Black clouds he belch’d, and flakes of livid fire.
    • 1793, William Blake, Visions of the Daughters of Albion, lines 30-33, [5]
      [] beneath him sound like waves on a desert shore
      The voice of slaves beneath the sun, and children bought with money,
      That shiver in religious caves beneath the burning fires
      Of lust, that belch incessant from the summits of the earth.
    • 1914, Harry Kemp, “I sing the Battle”, [6]
      I sing the song of the great clean guns that belch forth death at will.
      Ah, but the wailing mothers, the lifeless forms and still!

Synonyms

  • (expel gas): burp

Translations

See also

  • fart
  • pass gas

Noun

belch (plural belches)

  1. The sound one makes when belching.
    Synonym: burp
  2. (obsolete) Malt liquor.
    • c. 1699, John Dennis, letter to Mr. Collier
      Porters would no longer be drunk with Belch

Usage notes

  • A belch is often considered to be louder than a burp.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • blech


English

Etymology

Partly imitative, also influenced by burble. Compare Middle Dutch bobbe (bubble) > Dutch bubbel (bubble), Low German bubbel (bubble), Danish boble (bubble), Swedish bubbla (bubble).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌb.əl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌbəl

Noun

bubble (plural bubbles)

  1. A spherically contained volume of air or other gas, especially one made from soapy liquid.
    Antonym: antibubble
  2. A small spherical cavity in a solid material.
  3. (by extension) Anything resembling a hollow sphere.
  4. (figuratively) Anything lacking firmness or solidity; a cheat or fraud; an empty project.
  5. (economics) A period of intense speculation in a market, causing prices to rise quickly to irrational levels as the metaphorical bubble expands, and then fall even more quickly as the bubble bursts.
    • 2007, Elizabeth Grossman, High Tech Trash, Island Press (→ISBN), page 46:
      Thanks to the proliferation of semiconductor chips and cell phones—the number of U.S. cell phones grew from essentially zero in 1983 to nearly two hundred million by the end of 2004, and as of 2003 over one billion cell phones were in use worldwide, so by the time the high-tech bubble approached its bursting point in 2000 and 2001, coltan had become an extremely hot commodity.
  6. (figuratively) The emotional and/or physical atmosphere in which the subject is immersed.
    Synonyms: circumstances, ambience
    Hyponym: filter bubble
  7. An officer’s station in a prison dormitory, affording views on all sides.
    • 1998, District of Columbia Appropriations for 1998: Hearings
      Later that day, the unit was staffed with only one officer, who was required to stay in the bubble.
  8. (obsolete) Someone who has been ‘bubbled’ or fooled; a dupe.
    • 1709, Matthew Prior, Cupid and Ganymede
      Gany’s a cheat, and I’m a bubble.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1979, p. 15:
      For no woman, sure, will plead the passion of love for an excuse. This would be to own herself the mere tool and bubble of the man.
  9. A small, hollow, floating bead or globe, formerly used for testing the strength of spirits.
  10. The globule of air in the chamber of a spirit level.
  11. (Cockney rhyming slang) A laugh.
    Synonyms: giraffe, bubble bath
  12. (Cockney rhyming slang) A Greek.
    Synonym: bubble and squeak
  13. (computing, historical) Any of the small magnetized areas that make up bubble memory.
  14. (poker) The point in a poker tournament when the last player without a prize loses all their chips and leaves the game, leaving only players that are going to win prizes. (e.g., if the last remaining 9 players win prizes, then the point when the 10th player leaves the tournament)
  15. A group of people who are in quarantine together.

Synonyms

  • bull (obsolete)

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

bubble (third-person singular simple present bubbles, present participle bubbling, simple past and past participle bubbled)

  1. (intransitive) To produce bubbles, to rise up in bubbles (such as in foods cooking or liquids boiling).
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To churn or foment, as if wishing to rise to the surface.
    Rage bubbled inside him.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To rise through a medium or system, similar to the way that bubbles rise in liquid.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To cheat, delude.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 443:
      No, no, friend, I shall never be bubbled out of my religion in hopes only of keeping my place under another government []
  5. (intransitive, Scotland and Northern England) To cry, weep.
  6. (transitive) To pat a baby on the back so as to cause it to belch.
    • 1942, McCall’s, volume 69, page 94:
      Groggily her mind went back through the long hours to 10 P.M. She had fed Junior, bubbled him, diped him—according to plan.
  7. (transitive) To cause to feel as if bubbling or churning.
    • 1922, Conal O’Riordan, In London: The Story of Adam and Marriage, page 164:
      It seemed to Adam that he felt the blood in his toes creeping up his legs and body until it reached his brain where, finding it could go no farther, it bubbled him into dumbness: it added to his confusion to know that he looked as if some such accident had befallen his circulation.
    • 2011, Tim O’Brien, Northern Lights, page 201:
      The frothing sensation bubbled him all over, a boiling without heat or any sound or light.
  8. (transitive) To express in a bubbly or lively manner.
  9. (transitive) To form into a protruding round shape.
    • 1929, The Saturday Evening Post, volume 201, page 50:
      She bubbled her lips at Junior and wrinkled her eyes.
  10. (transitive) To cover with bubbles.
  11. (transitive) To bubble in; to mark a response on a form by filling in a circular area (‘bubble’).
    • 2019, Crash Course for the ACT, 6th Edition: Your Last-Minute Guide to Scoring High, page 15:
      You don’t want to go back and forth between the test booklet and your answer sheet to bubble your answers.
  12. (intransitive) To join together in a support bubble

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bubble.

Derived terms

  • bubble over
  • bubble under
  • bubble up

Translations

References

  • bubble at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [4]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

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