belfry vs campanile what difference

what is difference between belfry and campanile

English

Etymology

From Middle English belfrey, bellfray, belfray, from Old French belfroi, berfroi, berfrey (changed to have an ⟨l⟩ by association with bell), from Middle High German bërcvrit or bërvrit (defensive tower) (modern German Bergfried), possibly via Late Latin berefredus, from Proto-Germanic *bergafriþuz. Doublet of bergfried.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛlfɹi/, enPR: bĕlʹfrē

Noun

belfry (plural belfries)

  1. (architecture) A tower or steeple specifically for containing bells, especially as part of a church.
  2. (architecture) A part of a large tower or steeple, specifically for containing bells.
  3. (dialectal) A shed.
  4. (obsolete) A movable tower used in sieges.
  5. (obsolete) An alarm-tower; a watchtower containing an alarm-bell.

Derived terms

  • have bats in one’s belfry, have bats in the belfry

Translations

References

  • Michael Quinion (2004), “Belfry”, in Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, →ISBN.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian campanile (bell tower, belfry), from campana (bell) + -ile (suffix forming nouns indicating locations that host animals or objects). Campana is derived from Late Latin and Medieval Latin campāna (large bell used in late classical or medieval church towers or steeples; tower for such a bell, belfry, campanile), and then either:

  • traditionally regarded to be from Latin Campāna (region of Campania, Italy) (because bells were supposedly introduced in Christian services in Nola, a diocese of Campania, by Saint Paulinus (c. 354 – 431), though the story has been discredited), from Campānus (relating to the region of Campania, Italy, or its inhabitants, Campanian), from campus (field, plain) (from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂em- (to bend, curve)) + -ānus (suffix meaning ‘of or pertaining to’ forming adjectives, which are sometimes used as nouns); or
  • from Ancient Greek καπάνη (kapánē, felt helmet) (apparently because of the similarity in shape).

The plural form campanili is derived from Italian campanili.

Pronunciation

  • Singular:
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kæmpəˈniːleɪ/, (rare) /ˈkæmpənɪl/, /-aɪl/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌkæmpəˈnili/
    • Hyphenation: cam‧pa‧ni‧le
  • Plural (campanili)
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kæmpəˈniːli/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌkæmpəˈnili/
    • Hyphenation: cam‧pa‧ni‧li

Noun

campanile (plural campaniles or campanili)

  1. A bell tower (especially one that is freestanding), often associated with a church or other public building, especially in Italy.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • campanile on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Pronunciation

Noun

campanile m (plural campaniles)

  1. campanile

Italian

Etymology

From campana +‎ -ile. Compare Spanish campanil, Venetian canpaniłe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kam.paˈni.le/

Noun

campanile m (plural campanili)

  1. bell tower
  2. belfry

Derived terms

  • campanilismo
  • campamilista

Descendants

  • English: campanile

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