believe vs buy what difference

what is difference between believe and buy

English

Alternative forms

  • beleeve (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English beleven, bileven, from Old English belīefan (to believe), a later variant to Proto-Germanic *galaubijaną (to have faith, believe). Cognate with Scots beleve (to believe). Compare Old English ġelīefan (to be dear to; believe, trust), Old English ġelēafa (belief, faith, confidence, trust), Old English lēof (“dear, valued, beloved, pleasant, agreeable”; > English lief). Related also to North Frisian leauwjen (to believe), West Frisian leauwe (to believe), Dutch geloven (to believe), German glauben (to believe), Gothic ???????????????????????????????????? (galaubjan, to hold dear, valuable, or satisfactory, approve of, believe).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɪˈliːv/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɪˈliv/, /bi-/, /bə-/
  • Rhymes: -iːv
  • Hyphenation: be‧lieve

Verb

believe (third-person singular simple present believes, present participle believing, simple past and past participle believed)

  1. (transitive) To accept as true, particularly without absolute certainty (i.e., as opposed to knowing)
    Synonym: understand
  2. (transitive) To accept that someone is telling the truth.
    Synonym: trust
  3. (intransitive) To have religious faith; to believe in a greater truth.
  4. (transitive) To opine, think, reckon
    Do you think this is good?

    Hmm, I believe it’s okay.

Antonyms

  • disbelieve
  • (to accept as true without certainty): doubt
  • (to accept someone’s telling as true): mistrust, distrust, suspect

Usage notes

  • The transitive verb believe and the phrasal verb believe in are similar but can have very different implications.
    • To “believe” someone or something means to accept specific pieces of information as truth: believe the news, believe the lead witness. To “believe a complete stranger” means to accept a stranger’s story with little evidence.
    • To “believe in” someone or something means to hold confidence and trust in that person or concept: believe in liberty, believe in God. To “believe in one’s fellow man” means to place trust and confidence in mankind.
  • Meanings sometimes overlap. To believe in a religious text would also require affirming the truth of at least the major tenets. To believe a religious text might likewise imply placing one’s confidence and trust in it, in addition to accepting its statements as facts.
  • This is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs

Derived terms

Related terms

  • belief
  • disbelief

Translations


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

believe

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of believen

Anagrams

  • beviele


English

Etymology

From Middle English bien, biggen, buggen, from Old English bycġan (to buy, pay for, acquire, redeem, ransom, procure, get done, sell), from Proto-West Germanic *buggjan, from Proto-Germanic *bugjaną (to buy), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend), or from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeugʰ- (to take away, deliver).

Cognate with Scots by (to buy, purchase), obsolete Dutch beugen (to buy), Old Saxon buggian, buggean (to buy), Old Norse byggja (to procure a wife, lend at interest, let out), Gothic ???????????????????????? (bugjan, to buy). The spelling with “u” is from the Southwest, while the pronunciation with /aɪ/ is from the East Midlands.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /baɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: bi, bye, by

Verb

buy (third-person singular simple present buys, present participle buying, simple past bought, past participle bought or (rare, dialectal) boughten)

  1. (transitive) To obtain (something) in exchange for money or goods
    • 1793, Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography
      Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou wilt sell thy necessaries.
  2. (transitive) To obtain, especially by some sacrifice.
  3. (transitive) To bribe.
  4. (transitive) To be equivalent to in value.
  5. (transitive, informal) to accept as true; to believe
  6. (intransitive) To make a purchase or purchases, to treat (for a drink, meal or gift)
  7. (poker slang, transitive) To make a bluff, usually a large one.

Alternative forms

  • buie (archaic)

Synonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), purchase
  • (accept as true): accept, believe, swallow (informal), take on
  • ((intransitive) make a purchase): make a buy

Antonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), sell, vend
  • (accept as true): disbelieve, reject, pitch

Derived terms

Related terms

  • aby

Translations

Noun

buy (plural buys)

  1. Something which is bought; a purchase.

Antonyms

  • sale

Derived terms

  • buydown
  • buyout
  • impulse buy

Translations

References

  • buy in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • buy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BYU

Tatar

Noun

buy

  1. length

Wolof

Noun

buy

  1. A baobab fruit.

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