bell vs buzzer what difference

what is difference between bell and buzzer

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bĕl, IPA(key): /bɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English belle, from Old English belle (bell), from Proto-Germanic *bellǭ. Cognate with West Frisian belle, bel, Dutch bel, Low German Belle, Bel, Danish bjelde, Swedish bjällra, Norwegian bjelle, Icelandic bjalla.

Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. A percussive instrument made of metal or other hard material, typically but not always in the shape of an inverted cup with a flared rim, which resonates when struck.
    • 1848, Edgar Allan Poe, “The Bells”
      HEAR the sledges with the bells
      Silver bells!
      What a world of merriment their melody foretells!
  2. The sounding of a bell as a signal.
  3. (chiefly Britain, informal) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a bell later.
  4. A signal at a school that tells the students when a class is starting or ending.
  5. (music) The flared end of a brass or woodwind instrument.
  6. (nautical) Any of a series of strokes on a bell (or similar), struck every half hour to indicate the time (within a four hour watch)
  7. The flared end of a pipe, designed to mate with a narrow spigot.
  8. (computing) The bell character.
  9. Anything shaped like a bell, such as the cup or corolla of a flower.
  10. (architecture) The part of the capital of a column included between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist within the leafage of a capital.
  11. An instrument situated on a bicycle’s handlebar, used by the cyclist to warn of his or her presence.
  12. (Scotland, archaic) A bubble.
    • 1828, James Hogg, Mary Burnet
      He swam to the place where Mary disappeared but there was neither boil nor gurgle on the water, nor even a bell of departing breath, to mark the place where his beloved had sunk.
Synonyms
  • (in heraldry): campane
  • (rare): tintinnabule
Hyponyms
Meronyms
  • (internally suspended tool for striking): clapper, tongue
  • (flaring open end): mouth
Holonyms
  • (structure housing bells): bell tower, campanile
  • (sets of bells): carillon, peal
Coordinate terms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Fiji Hindi: belo
  • Japanese: ベル (beru)
Translations
See also
  • (study of bells): campanology
  • (expert in bells): campanist, campanologist
  • (player of bells): bell-ringer, carilloner, carilloneur, carillonist, ringer, tintinnabulary, tintinnabulist
  • (playing of bells): bell-ringing, tintinnabulation, tintinnabulism, tintinnation
  • (bell-related): campanistic, campanologic, campanarian, tintinnabular, tintinnabular, tintinnabulary, tintinnabulatory, tintinnabulous
  • (related to a peal of bells or bell tower): campanilian
  • (bell-shaped): bell-shaped, campanal, campaniform, campaniliform, campanular, campanulate, campanulated, campanulous, tintinnabulate
  • (containing bells): campaned
  • (sounding like a small bell): jingling, tinkling, tintinnabulant, tintinnabulating, tintinnating

Verb

bell (third-person singular simple present bells, present participle belling, simple past and past participle belled)

  1. (transitive) To attach a bell to.
    Who will bell the cat?
  2. (transitive) To shape so that it flares out like a bell.
    to bell a tube
  3. (slang, transitive) To telephone.
  4. (intransitive) To develop bells or corollas; to take the form of a bell; to blossom.
    Hops bell.
See also
  • bell out
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bellen, from Old English bellan (to bellow; make a hollow noise; roar; bark; grunt), from Proto-Germanic *bellaną (to sound; roar; bark), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to sound; roar; bark). Cognate with Scots bell (to shout; speak loudly), Dutch bellen (to bark), German Low German bellen (to ring), German bellen (to bark), Swedish böla (to low; bellow; roar).

Verb

bell (third-person singular simple present bells, present participle belling, simple past and past participle belled)

  1. (intransitive) To bellow or roar.
    • As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled / Once, twice and again!
    • 1872, Robert Browning, Fifine at the Fair:
      You acted part so well, went alɬ-fours upon earth / The live-long day, brayed, belled.
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber and Faber 2005, page 128:
      Then, incredibly, a rutting stag belled by the trunks.
  2. (transitive) To utter in a loud manner; to thunder forth.
    • 1591, Edmund Spenser, Astrophel:
      Their leaders bell their bleating tunes In doleful sound.
Derived terms
  • belling
Translations

Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. The bellow or bay of certain animals, such as a hound on the hunt or a stag in rut.
Translations

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin bellus. Compare Occitan bèll, bèu, French beau, Spanish bello.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbeʎ/
  • Rhymes: -eʎ
  • Homophone: vell

Adjective

bell (feminine bella, masculine plural bells, feminine plural belles)

  1. beautiful

Derived terms

  • bellament
  • bellesa
  • belles arts
  • embellir

Further reading

  • “bell” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “bell” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “bell” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “bell” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

German

Verb

bell

  1. singular imperative of bellen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of bellen

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic بَلَّ(balla).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛll/

Verb

bell (imperfect jbill, past participle miblul)

  1. to dip (immerse something shortly or partly into a liquid)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛɬ/
  • (South Wales, also) IPA(key): /beːɬ/

Adjective

bell

  1. Soft mutation of pell.

Mutation


English

Etymology

From buzz +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbʌzə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbʌzəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌzə(ɹ)

Noun

buzzer (plural buzzers)

  1. One who, or that which, buzzes; an insect that buzzes.
  2. A device that makes a buzzing sound.
    If you think you know the answer to the question, hit the buzzer as fast as you can.
  3. (US slang) A police badge.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 28:
      I flipped my wallet open on her desk and let her look at the buzzer pinned to the flap.
  4. (cricket, slang) A run scored from an overthrow.
  5. (obsolete) A gossip.

Descendants

  • Japanese: ブザー (buzā)

Translations


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