bell vs toll what difference

what is difference between bell and toll

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bĕl, IPA(key): /bɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English belle, from Old English belle (bell), from Proto-Germanic *bellǭ. Cognate with West Frisian belle, bel, Dutch bel, Low German Belle, Bel, Danish bjelde, Swedish bjällra, Norwegian bjelle, Icelandic bjalla.

Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. A percussive instrument made of metal or other hard material, typically but not always in the shape of an inverted cup with a flared rim, which resonates when struck.
    • 1848, Edgar Allan Poe, “The Bells”
      HEAR the sledges with the bells
      Silver bells!
      What a world of merriment their melody foretells!
  2. The sounding of a bell as a signal.
  3. (chiefly Britain, informal) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a bell later.
  4. A signal at a school that tells the students when a class is starting or ending.
  5. (music) The flared end of a brass or woodwind instrument.
  6. (nautical) Any of a series of strokes on a bell (or similar), struck every half hour to indicate the time (within a four hour watch)
  7. The flared end of a pipe, designed to mate with a narrow spigot.
  8. (computing) The bell character.
  9. Anything shaped like a bell, such as the cup or corolla of a flower.
  10. (architecture) The part of the capital of a column included between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist within the leafage of a capital.
  11. An instrument situated on a bicycle’s handlebar, used by the cyclist to warn of his or her presence.
  12. (Scotland, archaic) A bubble.
    • 1828, James Hogg, Mary Burnet
      He swam to the place where Mary disappeared but there was neither boil nor gurgle on the water, nor even a bell of departing breath, to mark the place where his beloved had sunk.
Synonyms
  • (in heraldry): campane
  • (rare): tintinnabule
Hyponyms
Meronyms
  • (internally suspended tool for striking): clapper, tongue
  • (flaring open end): mouth
Holonyms
  • (structure housing bells): bell tower, campanile
  • (sets of bells): carillon, peal
Coordinate terms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Fiji Hindi: belo
  • Japanese: ベル (beru)
Translations
See also
  • (study of bells): campanology
  • (expert in bells): campanist, campanologist
  • (player of bells): bell-ringer, carilloner, carilloneur, carillonist, ringer, tintinnabulary, tintinnabulist
  • (playing of bells): bell-ringing, tintinnabulation, tintinnabulism, tintinnation
  • (bell-related): campanistic, campanologic, campanarian, tintinnabular, tintinnabular, tintinnabulary, tintinnabulatory, tintinnabulous
  • (related to a peal of bells or bell tower): campanilian
  • (bell-shaped): bell-shaped, campanal, campaniform, campaniliform, campanular, campanulate, campanulated, campanulous, tintinnabulate
  • (containing bells): campaned
  • (sounding like a small bell): jingling, tinkling, tintinnabulant, tintinnabulating, tintinnating

Verb

bell (third-person singular simple present bells, present participle belling, simple past and past participle belled)

  1. (transitive) To attach a bell to.
    Who will bell the cat?
  2. (transitive) To shape so that it flares out like a bell.
    to bell a tube
  3. (slang, transitive) To telephone.
  4. (intransitive) To develop bells or corollas; to take the form of a bell; to blossom.
    Hops bell.
See also
  • bell out
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bellen, from Old English bellan (to bellow; make a hollow noise; roar; bark; grunt), from Proto-Germanic *bellaną (to sound; roar; bark), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to sound; roar; bark). Cognate with Scots bell (to shout; speak loudly), Dutch bellen (to bark), German Low German bellen (to ring), German bellen (to bark), Swedish böla (to low; bellow; roar).

Verb

bell (third-person singular simple present bells, present participle belling, simple past and past participle belled)

  1. (intransitive) To bellow or roar.
    • As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled / Once, twice and again!
    • 1872, Robert Browning, Fifine at the Fair:
      You acted part so well, went alɬ-fours upon earth / The live-long day, brayed, belled.
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber and Faber 2005, page 128:
      Then, incredibly, a rutting stag belled by the trunks.
  2. (transitive) To utter in a loud manner; to thunder forth.
    • 1591, Edmund Spenser, Astrophel:
      Their leaders bell their bleating tunes In doleful sound.
Derived terms
  • belling
Translations

Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. The bellow or bay of certain animals, such as a hound on the hunt or a stag in rut.
Translations

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin bellus. Compare Occitan bèll, bèu, French beau, Spanish bello.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbeʎ/
  • Rhymes: -eʎ
  • Homophone: vell

Adjective

bell (feminine bella, masculine plural bells, feminine plural belles)

  1. beautiful

Derived terms

  • bellament
  • bellesa
  • belles arts
  • embellir

Further reading

  • “bell” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “bell” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “bell” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “bell” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

German

Verb

bell

  1. singular imperative of bellen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of bellen

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic بَلَّ(balla).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛll/

Verb

bell (imperfect jbill, past participle miblul)

  1. to dip (immerse something shortly or partly into a liquid)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛɬ/
  • (South Wales, also) IPA(key): /beːɬ/

Adjective

bell

  1. Soft mutation of pell.

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /təʊl/, /tɒl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /toʊɫ/, /tɔl/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /toʊl/, /tɑl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl

Etymology 1

From Middle English toll, tol, tolle, from Old English tol, toll, toln (toll, duty, custom), from Proto-Germanic *tullō (what is counted or told), from Proto-Indo-European *dol- (calculation, fraud). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Tol (toll), Dutch tol (toll), German Zoll (toll, duty, customs), Danish told (toll, duty, tariff), Swedish tull (toll, customs), Icelandic tollur (toll, customs). More at tell, tale.

Alternate etymology derives Old English toll, from Medieval Latin tolōneum, tolōnium, alteration (due to the Germanic forms above) of Latin telōneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (telṓnion, toll-house), from τέλος (télos, tax).

Noun

toll (plural tolls)

  1. Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.
  2. A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc.
  3. (business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.
  4. (US) A tollbooth.
  5. (Britain, law, obsolete) A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor.
  6. A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive) To impose a fee for the use of.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).
  3. (transitive) To take as a toll.
  4. To pay a toll or tallage.
Translations

References

Etymology 2

Probably the same as Etymology 3. Possibly related to or influenced by toil

Noun

toll (plural tolls)

  1. The act or sound of tolling
Translations

Verb

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly.
  2. (transitive) To summon by ringing a bell.
    • When hollow murmurs of their evening bells / Dismiss the sleepy swains, and toll them to their cells.
  3. (transitive) To announce by tolling.
Derived terms
  • toller
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English tolen, tollen, variation of tullen, tillen (to draw, allure, entice), from Old English *tyllan, *tillan (to pull, draw, attract) (found in compounds fortyllan (to seduce, lead astray, draw away from the mark, deceive) and betyllan, betillan (to lure, decoy)), related to Old Frisian tilla (to lift, raise), Dutch tillen (to lift, raise, weigh, buy), Low German tillen (to lift, remove), Swedish dialectal tille (to take up, appropriate).

Alternative forms

  • tole, toal

Verb

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To draw; pull; tug; drag.
  2. (transitive) To tear in pieces.
  3. (transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure.
  4. (transitive) To lure with bait; tole (especially, fish and animals).
Synonyms
  • (to lure animals): bait, lure
Translations

Etymology 4

From Latin tollō (to lift up).

Verb

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (law, obsolete) To take away; to vacate; to annul.
  2. (law) To suspend.
Translations

Etymology 5

Verb

toll

  1. (African-American Vernacular) simple past tense and past participle of tell
    I done toll you for the last time.

References

  • toll at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • toll in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Catalan

Etymology

Probably from Proto-Celtic *tullom, *tullos (hole). (Compare Irish toll, Welsh twll, both meaning “hole”.)

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈtoʎ/

Noun

toll m (plural tolls)

  1. pool, puddle

References

  • “toll” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “toll” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

German

Etymology

From Old High German tol, from Proto-Germanic *dulaz (dazed, foolish, crazy, stupid), cognate with English dull. More at dull.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔl/, [tʰɔl]

Adjective

toll (comparative toller, superlative am tollsten)

  1. (colloquial) great, nice, wonderful
    Synonyms: cool, geil
  2. (dated) crazy, mad

Declension

Derived terms

  • supertoll
  • Tollheit
  • Tollwut

Related terms

  • doll

Further reading

  • “toll” in Duden online
  • “toll” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian

Etymology

From Proto-Uralic *tulka (feather, wing)..

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtolː]
  • Rhymes: -olː

Noun

toll (plural tollak)

  1. feather (a branching, hair-like structure that grows on the bodies of birds, used for flight, swimming, protection and display)
  2. feather (a feather-like fin or wing on objects, such as an arrow)
  3. pen (a tool, originally made from a feather but now usually a small tubular instrument, containing ink used to write or make marks)
  4. (figuratively) pen (a writer, or his style)

Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • toll in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic

Noun

toll

  1. indefinite accusative singular of tollur

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /t̪ˠoːl̪ˠ/, /t̪ˠɔl̪ˠ/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish toll (hole, hollow; buttocks, hindquarters), from Proto-Celtic *tullom, *tullos (hole), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tew- (to push, hit). Cognate with Welsh twll.

Noun

toll m (genitive singular toill, nominative plural toill)

  1. hole, hollow
  2. posterior, buttocks
Declension
Derived terms
  • tollán (tunnel)
  • tollmhór (big-bottomed; bumptious)

Etymology 2

From Old Irish toll (pierced, perforated; hollow, empty).

Adjective

toll (genitive singular masculine toill, genitive singular feminine toille, plural tolla, comparative toille)

  1. pierced, perforated
  2. hollow, empty; (of voice) deep, hollow
Declension

Etymology 3

From Old Irish tollaid (pierces; penetrates).

Verb

toll (present analytic tollann, future analytic tollfaidh, verbal noun tolladh, past participle tollta)

  1. to bore, to pierce, to perforate
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • tolladóir (borer, piercer, perforator)
  • tollbhealach (adit)
  • tollchárta (punch-card)
  • tolltach (piercing, penetrating)

Mutation


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English toll, from Proto-Germanic *tullō.

Alternative forms

  • tol, tolle, thol, toale, theol

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔl/, /tɔːl/

Noun

toll (plural tolles)

  1. A toll, tax, or charge.
  2. The privilege to levy fees or charges.
  3. A waiver from any fees or charges.
  4. (rare) taxation, payment.
  5. (rare) A edge, point of difference
Related terms
  • tolboth
  • tollen
  • toller
  • tolsey
  • tollynge
Descendants
  • English: tool
  • Scots: towl
References
  • “tol, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-03.

Etymology 2

Verb

toll

  1. Alternative form of tollen (to bring).

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Late Latin teloneum and Old Norse tollr

Noun

toll m (definite singular tollen, indefinite plural toller, definite plural tollene)

  1. duty (customs duty, excise duty)
  2. customs

Derived terms

  • tollbarriere
  • tollbod
  • tolldeklarasjon
  • tollfri

References

  • “toll” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Late Latin teloneum and Old Norse tollr

Noun

toll m (definite singular tollen, indefinite plural tollar, definite plural tollane)

  1. duty (customs duty, excise duty)
  2. customs

Derived terms

  • tollbarriere
  • tolldeklarasjon
  • tollfri

References

  • “toll” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *tollą, from Vulgar Latin toloneum, from Late Latin teloneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (telṓnion, toll-house), from τέλος (télos, tax). Germanic cognates include Old Saxon tol (Dutch tol), Old High German zol (German Zoll), Old Norse tollr (Swedish tull). See also parallel forms represented by Old English toln.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /toll/, [toɫ]

Noun

toll n

  1. tax, toll, fare

Descendants

  • Middle English: toll
    • English: toll
    • Scots: towl

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʰɔul̪ˠ/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish toll (hole, hollow; buttocks, hindquarters).

Noun

toll m (genitive singular tuill, plural tuill)

  1. hole, cavity, puncture, hollow
  2. crevice, perforation
  3. pit
  4. socket
  5. (nautical) hold of a ship
  6. (vulgar) arse
Derived terms
  • gaoth tro tholl (draught)
  • toll-putain (buttonhole)
  • tolltach (full of holes)

Etymology 2

From Old Irish tollaid (pierces; penetrates), from toll (hole, hollow).

Verb

toll (past tholl, future tollaidh, verbal noun tolladh, past participle tollte)

  1. bore, piece, drill, perforate

Skolt Sami

Etymology

From Proto-Samic *tolë, from Proto-Uralic *tule.

Noun

toll

  1. fire

Inflection

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Ter Sami

Etymology

From Proto-Samic *tolë, from Proto-Uralic *tule.

Noun

toll

  1. fire

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial