belligerent vs combatant what difference

what is difference between belligerent and combatant

English

Etymology

From Latin belligerans (waging war), present active participle of belligerō (I wage war), from belliger (waging war, warlike), from bellum (war) + -ger (from gerō (I lead, wage, carry on)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bəˈlɪdʒ.(ə).ɹənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bəˈlɪdʒ.ə.ɹənt/

Adjective

belligerent (comparative more belligerent, superlative most belligerent)

  1. Engaged in warfare, warring.
  2. Eager to go to war, warlike.
  3. Of or pertaining to war.
  4. (by extension) Aggressively hostile, eager to fight.
  5. Acting violently towards others.
  6. Uncooperative.

Synonyms

  • (eager to fight): aggressive, antagonistic, bellicose, combative, contentious, pugnacious, quarrelsome, truculent

Derived terms

  • belligerently
  • cobelligerent
  • nonbelligerent

Related terms

  • bellicose
  • belligerence
  • belligerency

Translations

Noun

belligerent (plural belligerents)

  1. A state or other armed participant in warfare

Translations

See also

  • warmonger

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French belligérant, from Latin belligerēns (waging war), present active participle of belligerō (wage war), from belliger (waging war, warlike), from bellum (war) + -ger (from gerō (wage, carry on)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛ.li.ɣəˈrɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: bel‧li‧ge‧rent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Adjective

belligerent (comparative belligerenter, superlative belligerentst)

  1. belligerent, engaged in warfare

Inflection

Synonyms

  • oorlogvoerend

Noun

belligerent m (plural belligerenten)

  1. A belligerent, armed party in warfare

Latin

Verb

belligerent

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of belligerō


English

Etymology

Inherited from late Middle English combataunt, from Middle French combatant. Doublet of combattant.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒm.bə.tənt/
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /kəm.ˈbæ.tənt/

Noun

combatant (plural combatants)

  1. A person engaged in combat, often armed.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act IV, Scene 1,[1]
      Come hither, you that would be combatants:
      Henceforth I charge you, as you love our favour,
      Quite to forget this quarrel and the cause.
    • 1789, Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, London: for the author, Volume 1, Chapter 3, p. 112,[2]
      On the passage, one day, for the diversion of those gentlemen, all the boys were called on the quarter deck, and were paired proportionably, and then made to fight; after which the gentlemen gave the combatants from five to nine shillings each.
    • 1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe, Chapter 12,[3]
      If any combatant was struck down, and unable to recover his feet, his squire or page might enter the lists, and drag his master out of the press; but in that case the knight was adjudged vanquished []
    • 1992, William M. Hutchins and Angele Botros Samaan (translators), Sugar Street by Naguib Mahfouz, New York: Anchor Books, 1993, Chapter 48, p. 271,[4]
      [] Don’t you realize that alcohol is an essential part of heroism? The combatant and the drunkard are brothers, you genius.”

Derived terms

  • contractor combatant
  • enemy combatant
  • illegal combatant
  • non-combatant

Synonyms

  • battler
  • fighter

Translations

Adjective

combatant (comparative more combatant, superlative most combatant)

  1. Contending; disposed to contend.
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, The Magnetic Lady, New York: Henry Holt, 1914, Act III, Scene 5, p. 65,[5]
      Their valours are not yet so combatant,
      Or truly antagonistick, as to fight;
  2. Involving combat.
    • 1921, John Dos Passos, Three Soldiers, New York: Modern Library, 1932, Part Two, Chapter 1, p. 71,[6]
      He wished he were in a combatant service; he wanted to fight, fight.

Middle French

Verb

combatant (feminine singular combatante, masculine plural combatans, feminine plural combatantes)

  1. present participle of combatre
  2. (may be preceded by en, invariable) gerund of combatre

Romanian

Etymology

From French combattant.

Adjective

combatant m or n (feminine singular combatantă, masculine plural combatanți, feminine and neuter plural combatante)

  1. fighting

Declension


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