bellow vs roar what difference

what is difference between bellow and roar

English

Alternative forms

  • (US, dialectal) beller

Etymology

From Middle English belwen, from Old English bylgian, ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to sound, roar), whence also belg (leather bag), bellan (to roar), blāwan (to blow). Cognate with German bellen (to bark), Russian бле́ять (bléjatʹ, baa, bleat).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɛloʊ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɛləʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛləʊ

Noun

bellow (plural bellows)

  1. The deep roar of a large animal, or any similar loud noise.

Translations

Verb

bellow (third-person singular simple present bellows, present participle bellowing, simple past and past participle bellowed)

  1. To make a loud, deep, hollow noise like the roar of an angry bull.
    • the bellowing voice of boiling seas
  2. To shout in a deep voice.

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English roren, raren, from Old English rārian (to roar; wail; lament), from Proto-Germanic *rairāną (to bellow; roar), from Proto-Indo-European *rey- (to shout; bellow; yell; bark), perhaps of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /ɹɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: rôr, IPA(key): /ɹɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: rōr, IPA(key): /ɹo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ɹoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: raw (in non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Verb

roar (third-person singular simple present roars, present participle roaring, simple past and past participle roared)

  1. (intransitive) To make a loud, deep cry, especially from pain, anger, or other strong emotion.
  2. To laugh in a particularly loud manner.
  3. Of animals (especially the lion), to make a loud deep noise.
    • {1590 Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene Bk 1, Canto VI, XXIV, lines 6&7}
      Roaring bulls he would him make to tame.
  4. Generally, of inanimate objects etc., to make a loud resounding noise.
    • How oft I crossed where carts and coaches roar.
  5. (figuratively) To proceed vigorously.
  6. (transitive) To cry aloud; to proclaim loudly.
    • 1639, John Ford, The Lady’s Trial
      This last action will roar thy infamy.
  7. To be boisterous; to be disorderly.
    • 1724, Gilbert Burnet, History of My Own Time
      It was a mad, roaring time, full of extravagance.
  8. To make a loud noise in breathing, as horses do when they have a certain disease.
  9. (Britain Yorkshire, North Midlands, informal) to cry

Translations

Noun

roar (plural roars)

  1. A long, loud, deep shout, as of rage or laughter, made with the mouth wide open.
  2. The cry of the lion.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The Winkies were not a brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the Lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.
  3. The deep cry of the bull.
  4. A loud resounding noise.
    the roar of a motorbike
    • 1944, Ernie Pyle, Brave Men, University of Nebraska Press (2001), page 107:
      “Those lovely valleys and mountains were filled throughout the day and night with the roar of heavy shooting.”
  5. A show of strength or character.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Raro, orra

Swedish

Verb

roar

  1. present tense of roa.

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