belly vs paunch what difference

what is difference between belly and paunch

English

Etymology

From Middle English bely, beli, bali, below, belew, balyw, from Old English belg, bælg, bæliġ (bag, pouch, bulge), from Proto-West Germanic *balgi, *balgu, from Proto-Germanic *balgiz, *balguz (skin, hide, bellows, bag), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵʰ- (to swell, blow up). Cognate with Dutch balg, German Balg. Doublet of bellows, blague, bulge, and budge. See also bellows.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛli/
  • Rhymes: -ɛli
  • Hyphenation: bel‧ly

Noun

belly (plural bellies)

  1. The abdomen, especially a fat one.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
  2. The stomach.
  3. The womb.
  4. The lower fuselage of an airplane.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 454:
      There was no heat, and we shivered in the belly of the plane.
  5. The part of anything which resembles the human belly in protuberance or in cavity; the innermost part.
  6. (architecture) The hollow part of a curved or bent timber, the convex part of which is the back.

Usage notes

  • Formerly, all the splanchnic or visceral cavities were called bellies: the lower belly being the abdomen; the middle belly, the thorax; and the upper belly, the head.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: bere

Translations

See also

  • abdomen
  • bouk
  • have eyes bigger than one’s belly
  • midriff
  • stomach
  • tummy

Verb

belly (third-person singular simple present bellies, present participle bellying, simple past and past participle bellied)

  1. To position one’s belly; to move on one’s belly.
    • 1903, Jack London, The Call of the Wild, Chapter 7,[1]
      Bellying forward to the edge of the clearing, he found Hans, lying on his face, feathered with arrows like a porcupine.
  2. (intransitive) To swell and become protuberant; to bulge or billow.
    • 1890, Rudyard Kipling, “The Rhyme of the Three Captains,”[2]
      The halliards twanged against the tops, the bunting bellied broad,
    • 1914, Theodore Roosevelt, Through the Brazilian Wilderness, Chapter 6,[3]
      There were trees whose trunks bellied into huge swellings.
    • 1917 rev. 1925 Ezra Pound, “Canto I”
      winds from sternward
      Bore us onward with bellying canvas …
    • 1930, Otis Adelbert Kline, The Prince of Peril, serialized in Argosy, Chapter 1,[4]
      The building stood on a circular foundation, and its walls, instead of mounting skyward in a straight line, bellied outward and then curved in again at the top.
  3. (transitive) To cause to swell out; to fill.
    • c. 1601, William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida, Act II, Scene 2,[5]
      Your breath of full consent bellied his sails;
    • 1920, Sinclair Lewis, Main Street, Chapter I, I,[6]
      A breeze which had crossed a thousand miles of wheat-lands bellied her taffeta skirt in a line so graceful, so full of animation and moving beauty, that the heart of a chance watcher on the lower road tightened to wistfulness over her quality of suspended freedom.

Derived terms

  • bellying
  • belly out
  • belly up


English

Etymology

From Middle English paunche, from Old Northern French panche, Old French pance (French panse), from Latin pantex.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔːntʃ/
  • (some accents) IPA(key): /pɑːntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːntʃ, -ɑːntʃ

Noun

paunch (plural paunches)

  1. The first compartment of the stomach of a ruminant, the rumen.
  2. The contents of this stomach in a slaughtered animal, viewed as food or a byproduct.
  3. The belly of a human, especially a large, fat protruding one.
  4. (nautical) A paunch mat.
  5. The thickened rim of a bell, struck by the clapper.

Synonyms

  • (protruding belly): See also Thesaurus:paunch.

Related terms

  • paunce
  • paunchy

Translations

Verb

paunch (third-person singular simple present paunches, present participle paunching, simple past and past participle paunched)

  1. To remove the internal organs of a ruminant, prior to eating.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 2
      (Caliban)
      Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custom with him
      I’ th’ afternoon to sleep: there thou may’st brain him,
      Having first seiz’d his books; or with a log
      Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
      Or cut his wezand with thy knife

Translations


Middle English

Noun

paunch

  1. Alternative form of paunche

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