belt vs knock what difference

what is difference between belt and knock

English

Etymology

From Middle English belt, from Old English belt (belt, girdle), from Proto-Germanic *baltijaz (girdle, belt), from Latin balteus (belt, sword-belt), of Etruscan origin. Cognate with Scots belt (belt), Dutch belt, German Balz (belt), Danish bælte (belt), Swedish bälte (belt, cincture, girdle, zone) and Icelandic belti (belt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Noun

belt (plural belts)

  1. A band worn around the waist to hold clothing to one’s body (usually pants), hold weapons (such as a gun or sword), or serve as a decorative piece of clothing.
  2. A band used as a restraint for safety purposes, such as a seat belt.
  3. A band that is used in a machine to help transfer motion or power.
  4. Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe.
  5. A trophy in the shape of a belt, generally awarded for martial arts.
  6. (astronomy) A collection of rocky-constituted bodies (such as asteroids) which orbit a star.
  7. (astronomy) One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.
  8. A powerful blow, often made with a fist or heavy object.
  9. A quick drink of liquor.
  10. (usually capitalized) A geographical region known for a particular product, feature or demographic (Corn Belt, Bible Belt, Black Belt, Green Belt).
  11. (baseball) The part of the strike zone at the height of the batter’s waist.
  12. (weaponry) A device that holds and feeds cartridges into a belt-fed weapon.
  13. (music) Vocal tone produced by singing with chest voice above the break (or passaggio), in a range typically sung in head voice.

Synonyms

  • (band worn around waist): girdle, waistband, sash, strap
  • (band used as safety restraint): restraint, safety belt, seat belt
  • (powerful blow): blow, punch, sock, wallop
  • (quick drink of liquor): dram, nip

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

belt (third-person singular simple present belts, present participle belting, simple past and past participle belted)

  1. (transitive) To encircle.
  2. (transitive) To fasten a belt on.
  3. (transitive) To invest (a person) with a belt as part of a formal ceremony such as knighthood.
  4. (transitive) To hit with a belt.
  5. (transitive, normally belt out) To scream or sing in a loud manner.
  6. (transitive) To drink quickly, often in gulps.
  7. (transitive, slang) To hit someone or something.
  8. (transitive, baseball) To hit a pitched ball a long distance, usually for a home run.
  9. (intransitive) To move very fast.

Synonyms

  • (to encircle): circle, girdle, surround
  • (to fasten a belt): buckle, fasten, strap
  • (to hit with a belt): strap, whip
  • (to drink quickly): gulp, pound, slurp
  • (to hit someone or something): bash, clobber, smack, wallop
  • (to move quickly): book, speed, whiz, zoom

Derived terms

  • belted l
  • belt out
  • belt up
  • beltloop

Translations

Anagrams

  • blet

Afrikaans

Etymology

Borrowed from English belt.

Noun

belt (plural belde)

  1. A belt (garment).

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛlt/
  • Hyphenation: belt
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1

A variant of bult.

Noun

belt m or f (plural belten, diminutive beltje n)

  1. (archaic) A heap, hill
  2. A dumpsite, notably for waste products.
Derived terms
  • asbelt
  • afvalbelt
  • beltmolen
  • gifbelt
  • vuilnisbelt
  • zandbelt

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English belt.

Noun

belt m (plural belten, diminutive beltje n)

  1. (Suriname) (clothing) A belt.
Synonyms
  • riem, broeksriem, gordel

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

belt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of bellen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of bellen

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic بَلَد(balad).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛlt/

Noun

belt f (plural bliet)

  1. A city, town.

Related terms


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *baltijaz. Cognate with Old High German balz, Old Norse belti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /belt/, [beɫt]

Noun

belt m (nominative plural beltas)

  1. A belt.

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: belt
    • English: belt (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: belt


English

Etymology

From Middle English knokken, from Old English cnocian, ġecnocian, cnucian (to knock, pound on, beat), from Proto-Germanic *knukōną (to knock), a suffixed form of *knu-, *kneu- (to pound on, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *gen- (to squeeze, pinch, kink, ball up, concentrate). The English word is cognate with Middle High German knochen (to hit), Old English cnuian, cnuwian (to pound, knock), Old Norse knoka (compare Danish knuge, Swedish knocka (to hug)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /nɒk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /nɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Noun

knock (countable and uncountable, plural knocks)

  1. An abrupt rapping sound, as from an impact of a hard object against wood.
  2. A sharp impact.
  3. (figuratively) Criticism.
    • 2012, Tom Lamont, How Mumford & Sons became the biggest band in the world (in The Daily Telegraph, 15 November 2012)[1]
      Since forming in 2007 Mumford & Sons have hard-toured their way to a vast market for throaty folk that’s strong on banjo and bass drum. They have released two enormous albums. But, wow, do they take some knocks back home.
  4. (automotive) Preignition, a type of abnormal combustion occurring in spark ignition engines caused by self-ignition; also, the characteristic knocking sound associated with it.
  5. (cricket) A batsman’s innings.
  6. (cycling) Synonym of hunger knock

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

knock (third-person singular simple present knocks, present participle knocking, simple past and past participle knocked)

  1. (transitive, dated) To strike for admittance; to rap upon, as a door.
  2. (transitive, colloquial) To criticize verbally; to denigrate; to undervalue.
  3. (transitive, soccer) To kick a ball towards another player; to pass.
  4. (transitive, Britain, slang, dated) To impress forcibly or strongly; to astonish; to move to admiration or applause.
  5. (transitive, intransitive, dated) To bump or impact.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      “The Silver Shoes,” said the Good Witch, “have wonderful powers. And one of the most curious things about them is that they can carry you to any place in the world in three steps, and each step will be made in the wink of an eye. All you have to do is to knock the heels together three times and command the shoes to carry you wherever you wish to go.”
  6. (intransitive) To rap one’s knuckles against something, especially wood.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Translations


Yola

Noun

knock

  1. Alternative form of knaugh

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