belt vs swath what difference

what is difference between belt and swath

English

Etymology

From Middle English belt, from Old English belt (belt, girdle), from Proto-Germanic *baltijaz (girdle, belt), from Latin balteus (belt, sword-belt), of Etruscan origin. Cognate with Scots belt (belt), Dutch belt, German Balz (belt), Danish bælte (belt), Swedish bälte (belt, cincture, girdle, zone) and Icelandic belti (belt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Noun

belt (plural belts)

  1. A band worn around the waist to hold clothing to one’s body (usually pants), hold weapons (such as a gun or sword), or serve as a decorative piece of clothing.
  2. A band used as a restraint for safety purposes, such as a seat belt.
  3. A band that is used in a machine to help transfer motion or power.
  4. Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe.
  5. A trophy in the shape of a belt, generally awarded for martial arts.
  6. (astronomy) A collection of rocky-constituted bodies (such as asteroids) which orbit a star.
  7. (astronomy) One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.
  8. A powerful blow, often made with a fist or heavy object.
  9. A quick drink of liquor.
  10. (usually capitalized) A geographical region known for a particular product, feature or demographic (Corn Belt, Bible Belt, Black Belt, Green Belt).
  11. (baseball) The part of the strike zone at the height of the batter’s waist.
  12. (weaponry) A device that holds and feeds cartridges into a belt-fed weapon.
  13. (music) Vocal tone produced by singing with chest voice above the break (or passaggio), in a range typically sung in head voice.

Synonyms

  • (band worn around waist): girdle, waistband, sash, strap
  • (band used as safety restraint): restraint, safety belt, seat belt
  • (powerful blow): blow, punch, sock, wallop
  • (quick drink of liquor): dram, nip

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

belt (third-person singular simple present belts, present participle belting, simple past and past participle belted)

  1. (transitive) To encircle.
  2. (transitive) To fasten a belt on.
  3. (transitive) To invest (a person) with a belt as part of a formal ceremony such as knighthood.
  4. (transitive) To hit with a belt.
  5. (transitive, normally belt out) To scream or sing in a loud manner.
  6. (transitive) To drink quickly, often in gulps.
  7. (transitive, slang) To hit someone or something.
  8. (transitive, baseball) To hit a pitched ball a long distance, usually for a home run.
  9. (intransitive) To move very fast.

Synonyms

  • (to encircle): circle, girdle, surround
  • (to fasten a belt): buckle, fasten, strap
  • (to hit with a belt): strap, whip
  • (to drink quickly): gulp, pound, slurp
  • (to hit someone or something): bash, clobber, smack, wallop
  • (to move quickly): book, speed, whiz, zoom

Derived terms

  • belted l
  • belt out
  • belt up
  • beltloop

Translations

Anagrams

  • blet

Afrikaans

Etymology

Borrowed from English belt.

Noun

belt (plural belde)

  1. A belt (garment).

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛlt/
  • Hyphenation: belt
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1

A variant of bult.

Noun

belt m or f (plural belten, diminutive beltje n)

  1. (archaic) A heap, hill
  2. A dumpsite, notably for waste products.
Derived terms
  • asbelt
  • afvalbelt
  • beltmolen
  • gifbelt
  • vuilnisbelt
  • zandbelt

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English belt.

Noun

belt m (plural belten, diminutive beltje n)

  1. (Suriname) (clothing) A belt.
Synonyms
  • riem, broeksriem, gordel

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

belt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of bellen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of bellen

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic بَلَد(balad).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛlt/

Noun

belt f (plural bliet)

  1. A city, town.

Related terms


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *baltijaz. Cognate with Old High German balz, Old Norse belti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /belt/, [beɫt]

Noun

belt m (nominative plural beltas)

  1. A belt.

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: belt
    • English: belt (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: belt


English

Alternative forms

  • swathe

Etymology

From Middle English swath, swathe, from Old English swæþ, swaþu (track; trace; footstep; mark; vestige; scar), from Proto-Germanic *swaþō (a wind-swept place; open field; borderland; terrain), from Proto-Indo-European *swem(bʰ)- (to bend, turn, swing).

Cognate with Dutch zwade, zwad (swath; windrow), German Schwade (swath; windrow), Icelandic svæði (area; zone; sector; region).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /swɒθ/, (sense 2) IPA(key): /sweɪð/
  • (US) IPA(key): /swɑθ/, /swɔθ/, (sense 2) IPA(key): /swɑð/, /sweɪð/, /swɔð/
  • Rhymes: -ɒθ

Noun

swath (plural swaths)

  1. The track cut out by a scythe in mowing.
  2. (often figuratively) A broad sweep or expanse, such as of land or of people.

Derived terms

  • cut a wide swath

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • HAWTs, Thaws, hawts, thaws, washt, waths, what’s, whats

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English swaþu.

Noun

swath

  1. Alternative form of swathe (swath)

Etymology 2

From Old English *swaþian.

Verb

swath

  1. Alternative form of swathen

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