bemoan vs lament what difference

what is difference between bemoan and lament

English

Etymology

From Middle English bemenen, bimenen, from Old English bemǣnan (to bemoan, bewail, lament); equivalent to be- (about, concerning) +‎ moan. Alteration of vowel from Middle to Modern English due to analogy with moan.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɪˈməʊn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɪˈmoʊn/
  • Rhymes: -əʊn
  • Hyphenation: be‧moan

Verb

bemoan (third-person singular simple present bemoans, present participle bemoaning, simple past and past participle bemoaned)

  1. (transitive) To moan or complain about (something).
    Synonyms: bewail, lament, mourn
    • 1577, Raphael Holinshed, The Chronicles of England, Scotlande and Irelande, London: John Hunne, “King Richard the seconde,” p. 1075[1]:
      The losse of this erle was greatly bemoned by men of al degrees, for he was liberal, gentle, humble, and curteous to eche one []
    • 1855, Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South, Chapter 1[2]:
      [] after deliberately marrying General Shaw with no warmer feeling than respect for his character and establishment, [she] was constantly, though quietly, bemoaning her hard lot in being united to one whom she could not love.
    • 1957, Muriel Spark, The Comforters, New York: Avon, 1965, Chapter 7, p. 155[3]:
      “I am sure you are better off without Mr. Hogg,” Helena would say often when Georgina bemoaned her husband’s desertion.
    • 2004, Andrea Levy, Small Island, London: Review, Chapter Nine, p. 112[4]:
      He’d have told that horrible sister of his that more coloureds had just turned up. How many is it now? they’d have said to each other. Fifty? Sixty? ‘You’ll have to speak to her, Cyril,’ she’d have told him, before bemoaning how respectable this street was before they came.
  2. (transitive, reflexive) To be dismayed or worried about (someone), particularly because of their situation or what has happened to them.
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act II scene v[5]:
      Son. Was ever son so rued a father’s death?
      Father. Was ever father so bemoan’d his son?
    • 1640, George Abbot, The Whole Booke of Iob Paraphrased, London, Chapter 6, verse 12, pp. 40-41[6]:
      Sure you take mee not to be made of flesh, or if so, yet not to be sensible that thinke me able to beare these burthens without bemoning my selfe.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 28[7]:
      My rest might have been blissful enough, only a sad heart broke it. [] It trembled for Mr. Rochester and his doom; it bemoaned him with bitter pity []
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 563:
      [] So we cried to him, “O Rais, what is the matter?”; and he replied saying, “Seek ye deliverance of the Most High from the strait into which we have fallen and bemoan yourselves and take leave of one another; for know that the wind hath gotten the mastery of us and hath driven us into the uttermost of the seas of the world.”
    • 1987, Tanith Lee, “Children of the Night” in Night’s Sorceries, Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday, p. 396[8]:
      “He is come to the town in order to marry a hapless maiden. The lady must be bemoaned.”

Derived terms

  • bemoaner
  • bemoaning
  • bemoaningly
  • forebemoaned

Translations

Anagrams

  • Beamon, on-beam, onbeam


English

Etymology

From French lamenter, from Latin lāmentor (I wail, weep), from lāmenta (wailings, laments, moanings); with formative -mentum, from the root *la-, probably ultimately imitative. Also see latrare.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ləˈmɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

lament (plural laments)

  1. An expression of grief, suffering, sadness or regret.
  2. A song expressing grief.

Derived terms

  • lamentful (rare)

Translations

Verb

lament (third-person singular simple present laments, present participle lamenting, simple past and past participle lamented)

  1. (intransitive) To express grief; to weep or wail; to mourn.
    • Ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice.
  2. (transitive) To feel great sorrow or regret; to bewail.
    • 2014, Paul Doyle, “Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter”, The Guardian, 18 October 2014:
      By the end, Sunderland were lucky to lose by the same scoreline Northampton Town suffered against Southampton, in 1921. The Sunderland manager, Gus Poyet, lamented that it was “the most embarrassed I’ve ever been on a football pitch, without a doubt”.
    • One laugh’d at follies, one lamented crimes.

Synonyms

  • bewail

Translations

Related terms

Further reading

  • lament in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lament in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Mantle, manlet, mantel, mantle, mental

French

Verb

lament

  1. third-person plural present indicative of lamer
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of lamer

Anagrams

  • mêlant, mental

Polish

Etymology

From Latin lāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.mɛnt/

Noun

lament m inan

  1. lament (expression of grief, suffering, or sadness)
    Synonym: lamentacja
  2. (poetry) threnody
    Synonyms: lamentacja, tren

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) lamentować

Related terms

  • (verbs) nalamentować, polamentować, zalamentować
  • (noun) lamentacja
  • (adjective) lamentacyjny

Further reading

  • lament in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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