bemock vs mock what difference

what is difference between bemock and mock

English

Etymology

From be- +‎ mock.

Verb

bemock (third-person singular simple present bemocks, present participle bemocking, simple past and past participle bemocked)

  1. (archaic) To ridicule or mock.
  2. (transitive) To mock repeatedly; flout.
  3. (transitive) To cause to appear as if mock or unreal; excel or surpass, as the genuine surpasses the counterfeit.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To make up as something else, to make into an imitation or semblance

Translations

Anagrams

  • Beckom


English

Alternative forms

  • mocque (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English mokken, from Old French mocquer, moquier (to deride, jeer), from Middle Dutch mocken (to mumble) or Middle Low German mucken (to grumble, talk with the mouth half-opened), both from Proto-West Germanic *mokkijan, *mukkijan (to low, bellow; mumble), from Proto-Germanic *mukkijaną, *mūhaną (to low, bellow, shout), from Proto-Indo-European *mūg-, *mūk- (to low, mumble). Cognate with Dutch mokken (to sulk; pout; mope; grumble), Old High German firmucken (to be stupid), Modern German mucksen (to utter a word; mumble; grumble), West Frisian mokke (to mope; sulk; grumble), Swedish mucka (to murmur), dialectal Dutch mokkel (kiss).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /mɒk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /mɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Noun

mock (plural mocks)

  1. An imitation, usually of lesser quality.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crashaw to this entry?)
  2. Mockery, the act of mocking.
  3. A practice exam set by an educating institution to prepare students for an important exam.
    He got a B in his History mock, but improved to an A in the exam.
  4. (software engineering) A mockup or prototype.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

mock (third-person singular simple present mocks, present participle mocking, simple past and past participle mocked)

  1. To mimic, to simulate.
  2. (rare) To create an artistic representation of.
  3. To make fun of, especially by mimicking; to taunt.
    • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
      Let not ambition mock their useful toil.
  4. To tantalise, and disappoint the hopes of.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act III, Scene III:
      “It is the greene-ey’d Monster, which doth mocke / The meate it feeds on.”
    • 1765, Benjamin Heath, A revisal of Shakespear’s text, page 563 (a commentary on the “mocke the meate” line from Othello):
      ‘Mock’ certainly never signifies to loath. Its common signification is, to disappoint.
    • 1812, The Critical Review or, Annals of Literature, page 190:
      The French revolution indeed is a prodigy which has mocked the expectations both of its friends and its foes. It has cruelly disappointed the fondest hopes of the first, nor has it observed that course which the last thought that it would have pursued.
  5. (software engineering, transitive) To create a mockup or prototype of.
    What’s the best way to mock a database layer?

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:mock
  • See also Thesaurus:imitate

Derived terms

  • mock out
  • much-mocked
  • mockworthy

Translations

See also

  • jeer

Adjective

mock (not comparable)

  1. Imitation, not genuine; fake.
    • 1776, United States Declaration of Independence
      For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

Translations

Anagrams

  • KCMO

Middle English

Noun

mock

  1. Alternative form of muk

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