bend vs curve what difference

what is difference between bend and curve

English

Etymology

From Middle English benden, from Old English bendan (to bind or bend (a bow), fetter, restrain), from Proto-Germanic *bandijaną (to bend), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to bind, tie). Cognate with Middle High German benden (to fetter), Danish bænde (to bend), Norwegian bende (to bend), Faroese benda (to bend, inflect), Icelandic benda (to bend). More at band.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /bɛnd/
  • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): /bɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb

bend (third-person singular simple present bends, present participle bending, simple past and past participle bent or (archaic) bended)

  1. (transitive) To cause (something) to change its shape into a curve, by physical force, chemical action, or any other means.
  2. (intransitive) To become curved.
  3. (transitive) To cause to change direction.
  4. (intransitive) To change direction.
  5. (intransitive) To be inclined; to direct itself.
  6. (intransitive, usually with “down”) To stoop.
  7. (intransitive) To bow in prayer, or in token of submission.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
      Each to his great Father bends.
  8. (transitive) To force to submit.
  9. (intransitive) To submit.
  10. (transitive) To apply to a task or purpose.
  11. (intransitive) To apply oneself to a task or purpose.
  12. (transitive) To adapt or interpret to for a purpose or beneficiary.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To tie, as in securing a line to a cleat; to shackle a chain to an anchor; make fast.
  14. (transitive, music) To smoothly change the pitch of a note.
  15. (intransitive, nautical) To swing the body when rowing.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

bend (plural bends)

  1. A curve.
    • 1968, Johnny Cash, Folsom Prison Blues
      I hear the train a comin’/It’s rolling round the bend
  2. Any of the various knots which join the ends of two lines.
  3. (in the plural, medicine, underwater diving, with the) A severe condition caused by excessively quick decompression, causing bubbles of nitrogen to form in the blood; decompression sickness.
  4. (heraldry) One of the honourable ordinaries formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base; it generally occupies a fifth part of the shield if uncharged, but if charged one third.
  5. (obsolete) Turn; purpose; inclination; ends.
    • 1608, John Fletcher, The Faithful Shepherdess, Act 1, Scene 3
      Farewell, poor swain; thou art not for my bend.
  6. In the leather trade, the best quality of sole leather; a butt; sometimes, half a butt cut lengthwise.
  7. (mining) Hard, indurated clay; bind.
  8. (nautical, in the plural) The thickest and strongest planks in a ship’s sides, more generally called wales, which have the beams, knees, and futtocks bolted to them.
  9. (nautical, in the plural) The frames or ribs that form the ship’s body from the keel to the top of the sides.
    the midship bends
  10. (music) A glissando, or glide between one pitch and another.

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

  • bent

References

  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [1]

Anagrams

  • D. Neb.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *band (drop). Compare Phrygian βεδυ (bedu, water), Sanskrit बिन्दु (bindú, drop), Middle Irish banna, baina (drop) and possibly Latin Fōns Bandusiae.

Noun

bend m

  1. pond, water reservoir
  2. idle or provocative words
  3. servant, henchman
Related terms
  • përbindësh

Northern Kurdish

Noun

bend ?

  1. slave

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From benda, bende (to bend).

Noun

bend n (definite singular bendet, indefinite plural bend, definite plural benda)

  1. a bend
  2. a bent position
  3. a butt on a thick rope

Participle

bend (neuter bendt, definite singular and plural bende)

  1. past participle of benda and bende

Verb

bend

  1. imperative of benda and bende

References

  • “bend” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Participle

bend

  1. inflection of bendr:
    1. strong feminine nominative singular
    2. strong neuter nominative/accusative plural

Verb

bend

  1. second-person singular active imperative of benda

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English bend.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbẽd͡ʒ/

Noun

bend m (plural bends)

  1. (music, electric guitar) bend (change in pitch produced by bending a string)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bênd/

Noun

bȅnd m (Cyrillic spelling бе̏нд)

  1. (music) band (group of musicians)

Declension



English

Etymology

From Latin curvus (bent, curved). Doublet of curb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɜːv/, [ˈkʰɜːv]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɝv/, [ˈkʰɝv]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)v

Adjective

curve

  1. (obsolete) Bent without angles; crooked; curved.

Translations

Noun

curve (plural curves)

  1. A gentle bend, such as in a road.
  2. A simple figure containing no straight portions and no angles; a curved line.
  3. A grading system based on the scale of performance of a group used to normalize a right-skewed grade distribution (with more lower scores) into a bell curve, so that more can receive higher grades, regardless of their actual knowledge of the subject.
  4. (analytic geometry) A continuous map from a one-dimensional space to a multidimensional space.
  5. (geometry) A one-dimensional figure of non-zero length; the graph of a continuous map from a one-dimensional space.
  6. (algebraic geometry) An algebraic curve; a polynomial relation of the planar coordinates.
  7. (topology) A one-dimensional continuum.
  8. (informal, usually in the plural) The attractive shape of a woman’s body.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

curve (third-person singular simple present curves, present participle curving, simple past and past participle curved)

  1. (transitive) To bend; to crook.
  2. (transitive) To cause to swerve from a straight course.
  3. (intransitive) To bend or turn gradually from a given direction.
  4. (transitive) To grade on a curve (bell curve of a normal distribution).
  5. (transitive) (slang) To reject, to turn down romantic advances.

Translations

Anagrams

  • cruve

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin curvus (bent, curved).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʏr.və/
  • Hyphenation: cur‧ve

Noun

curve f (plural curven or curves, diminutive curvetje n)

  1. curve: curved line
    Synonym: kromme

Derived terms


Italian

Adjective

curve

  1. feminine plural of curvo

Noun

curve f

  1. plural of curva

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkur.u̯e/, [ˈkʊɾu̯ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈkur.ve/, [ˈkurvɛ]

Adjective

curve

  1. vocative masculine singular of curvus

Portuguese

Verb

curve

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of curvar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of curvar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of curvar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of curvar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈkurve]

Noun

curve f

  1. plural of curvă

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkuɾbe/, [ˈkuɾ.β̞e]

Verb

curve

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of curvar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of curvar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of curvar.

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