bend vs flex what difference

what is difference between bend and flex

English

Etymology

From Middle English benden, from Old English bendan (to bind or bend (a bow), fetter, restrain), from Proto-Germanic *bandijaną (to bend), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to bind, tie). Cognate with Middle High German benden (to fetter), Danish bænde (to bend), Norwegian bende (to bend), Faroese benda (to bend, inflect), Icelandic benda (to bend). More at band.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /bɛnd/
  • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): /bɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb

bend (third-person singular simple present bends, present participle bending, simple past and past participle bent or (archaic) bended)

  1. (transitive) To cause (something) to change its shape into a curve, by physical force, chemical action, or any other means.
  2. (intransitive) To become curved.
  3. (transitive) To cause to change direction.
  4. (intransitive) To change direction.
  5. (intransitive) To be inclined; to direct itself.
  6. (intransitive, usually with “down”) To stoop.
  7. (intransitive) To bow in prayer, or in token of submission.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
      Each to his great Father bends.
  8. (transitive) To force to submit.
  9. (intransitive) To submit.
  10. (transitive) To apply to a task or purpose.
  11. (intransitive) To apply oneself to a task or purpose.
  12. (transitive) To adapt or interpret to for a purpose or beneficiary.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To tie, as in securing a line to a cleat; to shackle a chain to an anchor; make fast.
  14. (transitive, music) To smoothly change the pitch of a note.
  15. (intransitive, nautical) To swing the body when rowing.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

bend (plural bends)

  1. A curve.
    • 1968, Johnny Cash, Folsom Prison Blues
      I hear the train a comin’/It’s rolling round the bend
  2. Any of the various knots which join the ends of two lines.
  3. (in the plural, medicine, underwater diving, with the) A severe condition caused by excessively quick decompression, causing bubbles of nitrogen to form in the blood; decompression sickness.
  4. (heraldry) One of the honourable ordinaries formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base; it generally occupies a fifth part of the shield if uncharged, but if charged one third.
  5. (obsolete) Turn; purpose; inclination; ends.
    • 1608, John Fletcher, The Faithful Shepherdess, Act 1, Scene 3
      Farewell, poor swain; thou art not for my bend.
  6. In the leather trade, the best quality of sole leather; a butt; sometimes, half a butt cut lengthwise.
  7. (mining) Hard, indurated clay; bind.
  8. (nautical, in the plural) The thickest and strongest planks in a ship’s sides, more generally called wales, which have the beams, knees, and futtocks bolted to them.
  9. (nautical, in the plural) The frames or ribs that form the ship’s body from the keel to the top of the sides.
    the midship bends
  10. (music) A glissando, or glide between one pitch and another.

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

  • bent

References

  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [1]

Anagrams

  • D. Neb.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *band (drop). Compare Phrygian βεδυ (bedu, water), Sanskrit बिन्दु (bindú, drop), Middle Irish banna, baina (drop) and possibly Latin Fōns Bandusiae.

Noun

bend m

  1. pond, water reservoir
  2. idle or provocative words
  3. servant, henchman
Related terms
  • përbindësh

Northern Kurdish

Noun

bend ?

  1. slave

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From benda, bende (to bend).

Noun

bend n (definite singular bendet, indefinite plural bend, definite plural benda)

  1. a bend
  2. a bent position
  3. a butt on a thick rope

Participle

bend (neuter bendt, definite singular and plural bende)

  1. past participle of benda and bende

Verb

bend

  1. imperative of benda and bende

References

  • “bend” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Participle

bend

  1. inflection of bendr:
    1. strong feminine nominative singular
    2. strong neuter nominative/accusative plural

Verb

bend

  1. second-person singular active imperative of benda

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English bend.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbẽd͡ʒ/

Noun

bend m (plural bends)

  1. (music, electric guitar) bend (change in pitch produced by bending a string)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bênd/

Noun

bȅnd m (Cyrillic spelling бе̏нд)

  1. (music) band (group of musicians)

Declension



English

Etymology

Latin flexus, past participle of flecto (to bend).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɛks/
  • Rhymes: -ɛks
  • Homophone: flecks

Noun

flex (countable and uncountable, plural flexes)

  1. (uncountable) Flexibility, pliancy.
  2. (countable) The or an act of flexing.
    • 2002, Gary Noy, Red Dirt: A Journey of Discovery in the Landscape of Imagination, California’s Gold Country, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 144:
      The hills become more rounded. The slopes are either the stooped shoulders of an aging colossus or the muscular flexes of a geologic youngster, but they are pleasant, comforting. This landscape is what most would think of []
  3. (uncountable, chiefly Britain) Any flexible insulated electrical wiring.
  4. (uncountable) Flexible ductwork, typically flexible plastic over a metal wire coil to shape a tube.
    • 2010, Aaron Lubeck, Green Restorations: Sustainable Building and Historic Homes (page 221)
      Flex is quick and cheaper to install than metallic systems, but it yields higher pressure loss than other types of ducts and requires runs of less than 15 feet, minimal turns and elimination of kinks.
  5. (countable, geometry) A point of inflection.
  6. (countable, slang) The act of flaunting something; something one considers impressive.
    • 2017, “Mogul Bites”, Black American Moguls, Fall 2017, page 6:
      Getting together with other power players at Masa is the ultimate flex of conspicuous consumption. [] A party of five or more requires a deposit of $200 per person at least one week prior to the reservation.
    • 2019, Seth Sommerfeld, “Worldwide Web”, Inlander, 4 July 2019 – 10 July 2019, page 37:
      It’s an achievement to stand out from other Marvel movies in terms of special effects, but this whole movie feels like a flex for those computer wizards.
    • 2020, Daniel Varghese, “Aesop’s Hand Sanitizer Is a Flex for an Anxious Time”, GQ, 6 March 2020
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:flex.

Translations

Verb

flex (third-person singular simple present flexes, present participle flexing, simple past and past participle flexed)

  1. (transitive, chiefly physics or biomechanics) To bend something.
  2. (transitive) To repeatedly bend one of one’s joints.
  3. (transitive) To move part of the body using one’s muscles.
  4. (intransitive) To tighten the muscles for display of size or strength.
  5. (intransitive, slang, by extension) To flaunt one’s superiority.

Translations

Related terms

  • flexibility
  • flexible
  • flexing
  • flexion

Anagrams

  • XFEL

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