bender vs curve what difference

what is difference between bender and curve

English

Etymology

Hypotheses:

  • bend +‎ -er. In sense of “heavy drinking”, originally generally “spree”, from 1846, of uncertain origin – vague contemporary sense of “something extraordinary”, connection to bend (e.g., bending elbow to drink) or perhaps from Scottish sense of “strong drinker”.
  • In Britain, for about four centuries, a sixpence was known as a bender because its silver content made it easy to bend in the hands. This was commonly done to create ‘love tokens’, many of which survive in collections to this day. The value of a sixpence was also enough to get thoroughly inebriated as taverns would often allow you to drink all day for two pence. This gave rise to the expression ‘going on a bender’.
  • In the United States, Benderville is just outside of Green Bay, Wisconsin. There was a well known resort nearby owned by the Bender family where people from Chicago and other regional cities would vacation. The resort was very popular and people in the nearby cities began to use the term “going on a bender” to refer a weekend of fun and drinking at the resort.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɛndə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɛndɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛndə(ɹ)

Noun

bender (plural benders)

  1. One who, or that which, bends.
  2. A device to aid bending of pipes to a specific angle.
  3. (slang) A bout of heavy drinking.
    Synonyms: batter, binge
    He’s been out on a bender with his mates.
    • 1857, Newspaper, April:
      A couple of students of Williams College went over to North Adams on a bender. This would have been serious matter under the best of circumstances, but each returned with a “brick in his hat,” etc.
  4. (chiefly Britain, slang, derogatory) A homosexual man.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 6,
      “So they’re easy about having a bender in the house, are they, their lordships?”
  5. A simple shelter, made using flexible branches or withies
  6. (Britain, slang) A suspended sentence.
    • 2015, Olly Jarvis, Death by Dangerous (page 81)
      ‘Oh and Gary, what happened in Ahmed?’ ‘Not guilty, sir.’ ‘Oh no! And Tredwell?’ ‘Bender.’ ‘Suspended sentence? So both walked. []
    • 2019, Howard Williamson, Youth and Policy: Contexts and Consequences
      He anticipated a prison sentence though he thought there was a slight possibility of ‘getting off on a bender’ (suspended sentence).
  7. (obsolete, Britain, slang) A sixpence.
  8. (obsolete, slang, US) A spree, a frolic.
  9. (obsolete, slang, US) Something exceptional.

Usage notes

In sense “bout of heavy drinking”, usually in form “on a bender”.

Synonyms

  • (bout of heavy drinking): binge, spree, toot
  • (homosexual man): See Thesaurus:male homosexual
  • (shelter): bender tent

Derived terms

  • conduit bender
  • gender bender
  • pipe bender

Translations

Interjection

bender

  1. (obsolete, British slang) Used to express disbelief or doubt at what one has just heard. [early 19th c.]
  2. (obsolete, British slang) Used to indicate that the previous phrase was meant sarcastically or ironically. [early 19th c.]

Synonyms

  • (disbelief): See Thesaurus:bullshit
  • (sarcasm): I don’t think, not

References

  • Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang, p. 96
  • Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of the Underworld, London, Macmillan Co., 1949

Anagrams

  • Berden, berend, rebend

Aragonese

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

bender

  1. (transitive) to sell

References

  • Bal Palazios, Santiago (2002), “bender”, in Dizionario breu de a luenga aragonesa, Zaragoza, →ISBN


English

Etymology

From Latin curvus (bent, curved). Doublet of curb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɜːv/, [ˈkʰɜːv]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɝv/, [ˈkʰɝv]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)v

Adjective

curve

  1. (obsolete) Bent without angles; crooked; curved.

Translations

Noun

curve (plural curves)

  1. A gentle bend, such as in a road.
  2. A simple figure containing no straight portions and no angles; a curved line.
  3. A grading system based on the scale of performance of a group used to normalize a right-skewed grade distribution (with more lower scores) into a bell curve, so that more can receive higher grades, regardless of their actual knowledge of the subject.
  4. (analytic geometry) A continuous map from a one-dimensional space to a multidimensional space.
  5. (geometry) A one-dimensional figure of non-zero length; the graph of a continuous map from a one-dimensional space.
  6. (algebraic geometry) An algebraic curve; a polynomial relation of the planar coordinates.
  7. (topology) A one-dimensional continuum.
  8. (informal, usually in the plural) The attractive shape of a woman’s body.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

curve (third-person singular simple present curves, present participle curving, simple past and past participle curved)

  1. (transitive) To bend; to crook.
  2. (transitive) To cause to swerve from a straight course.
  3. (intransitive) To bend or turn gradually from a given direction.
  4. (transitive) To grade on a curve (bell curve of a normal distribution).
  5. (transitive) (slang) To reject, to turn down romantic advances.

Translations

Anagrams

  • cruve

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin curvus (bent, curved).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʏr.və/
  • Hyphenation: cur‧ve

Noun

curve f (plural curven or curves, diminutive curvetje n)

  1. curve: curved line
    Synonym: kromme

Derived terms


Italian

Adjective

curve

  1. feminine plural of curvo

Noun

curve f

  1. plural of curva

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkur.u̯e/, [ˈkʊɾu̯ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈkur.ve/, [ˈkurvɛ]

Adjective

curve

  1. vocative masculine singular of curvus

Portuguese

Verb

curve

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of curvar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of curvar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of curvar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of curvar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈkurve]

Noun

curve f

  1. plural of curvă

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkuɾbe/, [ˈkuɾ.β̞e]

Verb

curve

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of curvar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of curvar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of curvar.

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