benefaction vs benevolence what difference

what is difference between benefaction and benevolence

English

Etymology

From Latin benefactiōnem, from benefacere (to benefit).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɛnɪˈfakʃ(ə)n/

Noun

benefaction (countable and uncountable, plural benefactions)

  1. An act of doing good; a benefit, a blessing.
    • 1999, Joyce Crick, translating Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, Oxford 2008, p. 70:
      We all feel that sleep is a benefaction [transl. Wohlthat] to our psychical life, and the obscure awareness of the popular mind is clearly unwilling to be robbed of its prejudice that the dream is one of the ways in which sleep confers its benefactions.
  2. An act of charity; almsgiving.

Translations



English

Etymology

Circa 1400, original sense “good will, disposition to do good”, Old French benivolence from Latin benevolentia (also directly from Latin), literally “good will”, from bene (well, good) + volentia, form of volēns, form of volō (I wish), components cognate to English benefit and voluntary, more distantly will (via Proto-Indo-European).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈnɛvələns/

Noun

benevolence (countable and uncountable, plural benevolences)

  1. (uncountable) Disposition to do good.
  2. (uncountable) Charitable kindness.
  3. (countable) An altruistic gift or act.
  4. (Britain, historical) A kind of forced loan or contribution levied by kings without legal authority, first so called under Edward IV in 1473.

Related terms

Antonyms

  • malevolence

Translations

References


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