benefactor vs helper what difference

what is difference between benefactor and helper

English

Alternative forms

  • benefactour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English benefactor, borrowed from Medieval Latin benefactor (he who bestows a favor), from Latin benefaciō (benefit someone), from bene (good) + faciō (do, make).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: bĕn’əfăktər, IPA(key): /ˈbɛnəˌfæktɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɛnəˌfaktə/
  • Hyphenation: ben‧e‧fac‧tor

Noun

benefactor (plural benefactors, feminine benefactress or benefactoress or benefactrix)

  1. Somebody who gives a gift, often money to a charity.
  2. Someone who performs good or noble deeds.

Related terms

  • benefactive
  • benefactress
  • benefactrix
  • beneficiary (near antonym)
  • beneficent

Translations


Catalan

Alternative forms

  • benfactor

Etymology

From Late Latin benefactor.

Noun

benefactor m (plural benefactors, feminine benefactora)

  1. benefactor

Related terms

  • malfactor, malefactor

Further reading

  • “benefactor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “benefactor” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “benefactor” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “benefactor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Latin

Etymology

From benefaciō or benefactus +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /be.neˈfak.tor/, [bɛnɛˈfäkt̪ɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /be.neˈfak.tor/, [bɛnɛˈfɑkt̪ɔr]

Noun

benefactor m (genitive benefactōris); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) benefactor; one who confers a favour

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Antonyms

  • malefactor

Related terms

  • benefactus

Descendants

References

  • benefactor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • benefactor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin benefactor, from Latin benefacio. Compare the inherited doublet bienhechor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /benefakˈtoɾ/, [be.ne.fakˈt̪oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: be‧ne‧fac‧tor

Noun

benefactor m (plural benefactores, feminine benefactora, feminine plural benefactoras)

  1. benefactor

Related terms

  • bienfacer

Further reading

  • “benefactor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From Middle English helpere, from Old English *helpere, from Proto-West Germanic *helpārī (helper), equivalent to help +‎ -er. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Hälper (helper), West Frisian helper (helper), Dutch helper (helper), German Low German Helper (helper), German Helfer (helper), Danish hjælper (helper), Swedish hjälpare (helper), Icelandic hjálpar (helper).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhɛlpɚ/

Noun

helper (plural helpers)

  1. One who helps; an aide; assistant; auxiliary.
  2. That which helps; anything serving to assist.
    • 2005, PC World (volume 23, page 158)
      While Adobe’s Acrobat Reader, Macromedia’s Flash player, and other common plug-ins suggest themselves the moment you encounter a site that requires them, other browser helpers are harder to find.
    • 2012, Jude Deveraux, The Mulberry Tree (page 84)
      He no longer liked food that had “helper” in the name, such as Hamburger Helper and Tuna Helper. Patsy said he’d become uppity, and maybe, when it came to food, he had.
    • 2014, Neale Blackwood, Advanced Excel Reporting for Management Accountants (page 154)
      If a particular calculation is to be used a few times, it makes sense to put it in a helper cell so that it can be referred to by other formulas.
  3. (Singapore) A person who does cleaning and cooking in a family home, or in a market; domestic employee.
  4. (rail transport, US) a locomotive that assists a train, usually on steep gradients.

Synonyms

  • banker (locomotive)

Translations

Anagrams

  • Hepler

Cebuano

Etymology

From English helper.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: hel‧per

Noun

helper

  1. a maid; a servant or cleaner
  2. an aide

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch helpere. Equivalent to helpen +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦɛl.pər/
  • Hyphenation: hel‧per

Noun

helper m (plural helpers, diminutive helpertje n)

  1. One who helps, gives aid; deputy, assistant, aide, flunky
    Synonyms: assistent, hulp

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: helper

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