berceuse vs lullaby what difference

what is difference between berceuse and lullaby

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French berceuse.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɛɹˈsuz/

Noun

berceuse (plural berceuses)

  1. A lullaby.

Translations

References


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French berceuse.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌbɛrˈsøː.zə/
  • Hyphenation: ber‧ceu‧se
  • Rhymes: -øːzə

Noun

berceuse f (plural berceuses)

  1. (relatively formal, also figuratively) A lullaby, especially one composed by a composer.
    Synonyms: slaaplied, wiegelied
  2. (formal, dated) rocking chair
    Synonym: schommelstoel

French

Etymology

bercer +‎ -euse

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛʁ.søz/

Noun

berceuse f (plural berceuses)

  1. cradler, someone who cradles or rocks a baby.
  2. a lullaby
  3. rocking chair

Related terms

  • berceur

Descendants

  • Dutch: berceuse
  • English: berceuse

Further reading

  • “berceuse” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • lullabye (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English lullen (to lull) + bye. First recorded circa 1560. Compare Old English bī, bī (lullaby!, interjection).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlʌləbaɪ/

Noun

lullaby (plural lullabies)

  1. A cradlesong, a soothing song to calm children or lull them to sleep.

Synonyms

  • berceuse
  • cradle song

Related terms

  • hushaby
  • lull

Translations

Verb

lullaby (third-person singular simple present lullabies, present participle lullabying, simple past and past participle lullabied)

  1. (transitive) To sing a lullaby to.

Further reading

  • lullaby on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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