berm vs shoulder what difference

what is difference between berm and shoulder

English

Etymology

From French berme, from Middle Dutch baerm (Modern Dutch berm), from Old Dutch *barm, from Proto-West Germanic *barm, from Proto-Germanic *barmaz. Related to English brim.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)m

Noun

berm (plural berms)

  1. A narrow ledge or shelf, as along the top or bottom of a slope.
  2. A raised bank or path, especially the bank of a canal opposite the towpath.
  3. A terrace formed by wave action along a beach.
  4. A mound or bank of earth, used especially as a barrier or to provide insulation.
  5. A ledge between the parapet and the moat in a fortification.
  6. (Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania) A strip of land between a street and sidewalk.

Synonyms

  • (strip of land between street and sidewalk): see list at tree lawn
  • (canal bank opposite towpath): heelpath

Translations

Verb

berm (third-person singular simple present berms, present participle berming, simple past and past participle bermed)

  1. To provide something with a berm

Anagrams

  • Brem

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch baerm, from Old Dutch *barm, from Proto-Germanic *barmaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛrm/
  • Hyphenation: berm
  • Rhymes: -ɛrm

Noun

berm m (plural bermen, diminutive bermpje n)

  1. berm, verge, tree lawn, roadside (strip of land next to a road, street or sidewalk)

Derived terms

  • bermlamp
  • bermlicht
  • bermooievaarsbek
  • bermprostitutie
  • bermtoerisme
  • bermtoerist
  • bermzuring
  • binnenberm
  • buitenberm
  • grasberm
  • zandberm
  • zeeberm

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English beorma.

Noun

berm

  1. Alternative form of berme

Etymology 2

From Old English bearm.

Noun

berm

  1. Alternative form of barm


English

Etymology

From Middle English schuldre, sholder, shulder, schulder, from Old English sculdra, sculdor (shoulder), from Proto-West Germanic *skuldru (shoulder), of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *skelduz (shield), see shield. Cognate with Old Frisian skuldere (shoulder) (West Frisian skouder (shoulder)), Middle Low German scholder (shoulder), Low German Schuller (shoulder), Dutch schouder (shoulder), German Schulter (shoulder), Danish skulder (shoulder), Swedish skuldra (shoulder).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈʃəʊɫdə/
  • (General American) enPR: shōlʹdər, IPA(key): /ˈʃoʊɫdɚ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊldə(r)
  • Hyphenation: shoul‧der

Noun

shoulder (plural shoulders)

  1. The part of an animal’s body between the base of the neck and forearm socket.
    1. The part of the human torso forming a relatively horizontal surface running away from the neck.
    2. (anatomy) The joint between the arm and the torso, sometimes including the surrounding muscles, tendons, and ligaments.
    3. A cut of meat comprising the upper joint of the foreleg and the surrounding muscle.
    4. The portion of a garment where the shoulder is clothed.
  2. Anything forming a shape resembling a human shoulder.
  3. (topography) A shelf between two levels.
    1. A verge to the side of a road.
    2. The portion of a hill or mountain just below the peak.
    3. A lateral protrusion of a hill or mountain.
    4. The angle of a bastion included between the face and flank.
    5. An abrupt projection which forms an abutment on an object, or limits motion, etc., such as the projection around a tenon at the end of a piece of timber.
  4. (printing) The flat portion of type that is below the bevelled portion that joins up with the face.
  5. (of an object) The portion between the neck and the body.
    1. (music) The rounded portion of a stringed instrument where the neck joins the body.
    2. The rounded portion of a bottle where the neck meets the body.
    3. (firearms) The angled section between the neck and the main body of a cartridge.
  6. (figuratively) That which supports or sustains; support.
  7. The part of a key between the cuts and the bow.
  8. (surfing) The part of a wave that has not yet broken.
  9. (aviation) A season or a time of day when there is relatively little air traffic.
    Coordinate term: noon balloon
    • 1976, Trade and Industry (volume 25, page 270)
      For a round-trip journey starting from the UK during the shoulder period (1 April-30 June) []
    • 2003, Proceedings of the 8th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 29 June-3 July 2003) (page 184)
      the determination of noise-induced disturbances during the shoulder hours and their consequences for the consecutive sleep period

Hyponyms

  • (a verge to the side of a road): hard shoulder, soft shoulder

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

shoulder (third-person singular simple present shoulders, present participle shouldering, simple past and past participle shouldered)

  1. (transitive) To push (a person or thing) using one’s shoulder.
    • 1714, Nicholas Rowe, The Tragedy of Jane Shore
      Around her numberless the rabble flowed, / Shouldering each other, crowding for a view.
  2. (transitive) To put (something) on one’s shoulders.
    • 1922, A. M. Chisholm, A Thousand a Plate
      Early in the morning they shouldered light packs, took their rifles, crossed the big draw, and entered the timber where was the deadfall.
  3. (transitive) To place (something) against one’s shoulders.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To bear a burden, as a financial obligation.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To accept responsibility for.
  6. (transitive) To form a shape resembling a shoulder.
  7. (intransitive) To move by or as if by using one’s shoulders.
  8. (transitive) To round and slightly raise the top edges of slate shingles so that they form a tighter fit at the lower edge and can be swung aside to expose the nail.
  9. (intransitive) To slope downwards from the crest and whitewater portion of a wave.
  10. (transitive, archaic, slang) Of a servant: to embezzle money from (the employer).

Translations

Further reading

  • shoulder at OneLook Dictionary Search

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial