berth vs spot what difference

what is difference between berth and spot

English

Alternative forms

  • birth, byrth (obsolete)

Etymology

Origin obscure. Possibly from Middle English *berth (bearing, carriage), equivalent to bear +‎ -th. This would make it a doublet of birth.

Alternatively, from an alteration of Middle English beard, bærde (bearing, conduct), itself of obscure formation. Compare Old English ġebǣru (bearing, conduct, behaviour).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɜːθ/
  • (US) enPR: bûrth, IPA(key): /bɝθ/
  • Homophone: birth
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)θ

Noun

berth (plural berths)

  1. A fixed bunk for sleeping (in caravans, trains, etc).
  2. Room for maneuvering or safety. (Often used in the phrase a wide berth.)
  3. A space for a ship to moor or a vehicle to park.
  4. (nautical) A room in which a number of the officers or ship’s company mess and reside.
  5. A job or position, especially on a ship.
  6. (sports) Position or seed in a tournament bracket.
  7. (sports) position on the field of play

Translations

Verb

berth (third-person singular simple present berths, present participle berthing, simple past and past participle berthed)

  1. (transitive) to bring (a ship or vehicle) into its berth
  2. (transitive) to assign a berth (bunk or position) to

Translations


Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛrθ/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Brythonic *berθ, from Proto-Celtic *berxtos.

Adjective

berth (feminine singular berth, plural berthion, equative berthed, comparative berthach, superlative berthaf)

  1. (obsolete) fair, fine, beautiful

Derived terms

  • anferth (colossal, gargantuan)
  • prydferth (beautiful, handsome)

Mutation

Etymology 2

Noun

berth

  1. Soft mutation of perth (hedge).

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Middle English spot, spotte, partially from Middle Dutch spotte (spot, speck), and partially merging with Middle English splot, from Old English splott (spot, plot of land). Cognate with North Frisian spot (speck, piece of ground), Low German spot (speck), Old Norse spotti (small piece). See also splot, splotch.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /spɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (US) IPA(key): /spɑt/

Noun

spot (plural spots)

  1. A round or irregular patch on the surface of a thing having a different color, texture etc. and generally round in shape.
  2. A stain or disfiguring mark.
  3. A pimple, papule or pustule.
  4. A small, unspecified amount or quantity.
  5. (slang, US) A bill of five-dollar or ten-dollar denomination in dollars.
  6. A location or area.
    • 1800, William Wordsworth, Hart-leap Well
      “A jolly place,” said he, “in times of old! / But something ails it now: the spot is curs’d.”
    • 2011, Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 12-19 France [1]
      Yachvilli made it 6-0 with a second sweet strike from 45 metres after Matt Stevens was penalised for collapsing a scrum, and then slid another penalty just wide from the same spot.
  7. A parking space.
  8. (sports) An official determination of placement.
  9. A bright lamp; a spotlight.
  10. (US, advertising) A brief advertisement or program segment on television.
  11. A difficult situation.
    Synonyms: predicament; see also Thesaurus:difficult situation
  12. (gymnastics, dance, weightlifting) One who spots (supports or assists a maneuver, or is prepared to assist if safety dictates); a spotter.
  13. (soccer) Penalty spot.
  14. The act of spotting or noticing something.
  15. A variety of the common domestic pigeon, so called from a spot on its head just above the beak.
  16. A food fish (Leiostomus xanthurus) of the Atlantic coast of the United States, with a black spot behind the shoulders and fifteen oblique dark bars on the sides.
  17. The southern redfish, or red horse (Sciaenops ocellatus), which has a spot on each side at the base of the tail.
  18. (in the plural, brokers’ slang, dated) Commodities, such as merchandise and cotton, sold for immediate delivery.
  19. An autosoliton.
  20. (finance) A decimal point; point.
  21. Any of various points marked on the table, from which balls are played, in snooker, pool, billiards, etc.
  22. Any of the balls marked with spots in the game of pool, which one player aims to pot, the other player taking the stripes.

Hyponyms

  • sitspot
  • shot spot
  • sweet spot

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Catalan: espot

Translations

Verb

spot (third-person singular simple present spots, present participle spotting, simple past and past participle spotted)

  1. (transitive) To see, find; to pick out, notice, locate, distinguish or identify.
  2. (finance) To loan a small amount of money to someone.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To stain; to leave a spot (on).
  4. To remove, or attempt to remove, a stain.
  5. To retouch a photograph on film to remove minor flaws.
  6. (gymnastics, dance, weightlifting, climbing) To support or assist a maneuver, or to be prepared to assist if safety dictates.
  7. (dance) To keep the head and eyes pointing in a single direction while turning.
  8. To stain; to blemish; to taint; to disgrace; to tarnish, as reputation.
  9. To cut or chip (timber) in preparation for hewing.
  10. To place an object at a location indicated by a spot. Notably in billiards or snooker.

Translations

Adjective

spot (not comparable)

  1. (commerce, finance) Available on the spot; for immediate payment or delivery.

Translations

Anagrams

  • OTPs, POST, POTS, PTOs, Post, TPOs, opts, post, post-, post., pots, stop, tops

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsb̥ʌd̥]

Etymology 1

From the verb spotte (to mock). Compare Old Norse spottr, German Spott.

Noun

spot c (singular definite spotten, not used in plural form)

  1. mockery, ridicule
    • 2013, Jan Guillou, Vejen til Jerusalem, Modtryk →ISBN
      Men at også den anden søn savnede alle mandlige dyder, var straks værre og gjorde spotten større.

      But that the other son, too, lacked all male virtues, was much worse and enlarged the mockery.
    • 2010, Tove Ditlevsen, Man gjorde et barn fortræd, Gyldendal A/S →ISBN
      Hun havde råd til at smile igen, så ligegyldig var deres spot hende.

      She could afford to smile back, that was how little she cared about their ridicule.
    • 2015, Jørgen Christensen, Muhammed-tegningerne, demokratiet og sikkerhedspolitikken, BoD – Books on Demand →ISBN, page 9
      I artiklen skrev kulturredaktør Flemming Rose bl.a., at muslimer måtte acceptere, at deres religiøse følelser blev udsat for hån, spot og latterliggørelse[sic]:…

      In the article, editor of culture Flemming Rose wrote, among other things, that muslims had to accept their religious feelings being made the object of mockery, derision and ridicule:…
    • 2014, Fjodor M. Dostojevskij, Minder fra dødens hus, Bechs Forlag – Viatone →ISBN
      Først sporede man hos alle en heftig forbitrelse, derefter en dyb nedslåethed, og endelig syntes al sindsbevægelse at vige pladsen for hoverende spot.

      At first, one saw with everyone a hefty bitterness, then a deep sadness, and finally, all emotion seemed to recede, making way for gloating mockery.
Inflection

Etymology 2

From English spot.

Noun

spot c or n (singular definite spotten or spottet, plural indefinite spot or spots)

  1. spotlight
    • 1982, Lene H. Bagger, Idioterne, p. 179
      I millisekundet hvor lyset satte spots på hendes uforberedte ansigt, røbede det hende

      In the short moment when the light turned the spotlight on her unprepared face, it revealed her
  2. spot (short advertisement in radio or TV)
    • 2012, Jyllands-Posten
      Lego meddeler, at deres juleomsætning overgik alle forventninger på grund af spottene i TV 2

      LEGO informs that their Christmas sale surpassed all expectations due to the spots on TV 2
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

spot

  1. imperative of spotte

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch spot, from Old Dutch *spot, from Proto-Germanic *spuþþaz.

Noun

spot m (uncountable)

  1. mockery
    Synonyms: spotternij, plagerij, pesterij

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: spot

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English spot.

Noun

spot m (plural spots, diminutive spotje n)

  1. spot; a spotlight.
  2. spot; a brief segment on television.

Anagrams

  • post, stop

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English spot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔt/

Noun

spot m (plural spots)

  1. (physics) light spot
  2. blip (on radar)
  3. (cinematography, theater) spotlight, spot
  4. (surfing) area
  5. (television) spot; a brief segment on television.

Further reading

  • “spot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • pots, stop

Indonesian

Etymology

From English spot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈspɔt]
  • Hyphenation: spot

Noun

spot

  1. (colloquial) spot, a location or area.

Further reading

  • “spot” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Etymology

From English spot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspɔt/

Noun

spot m (invariable)

  1. spot (theatrical light; luminous point; brief radio or TV advertisment)

Further reading

  • spot in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

  • post, post-, stop

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *spot, from Proto-Germanic *sputtaz.

Noun

spot m or n

  1. joke, jest
  2. mockery, derision

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • spotten

Descendants

  • Dutch: spot

Further reading

  • “spot”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “spot”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Old High German

Etymology

Compare Dutch spot. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

spot m

  1. mockery

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle High German: spot
    • German: Spott

References

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English spot (brief advertisement).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔt/

Noun

spot m inan

  1. (neologism) spot, a short broadcast in television

Usage notes

Used for all short informational and promotional broadcasts, such as public service announcements, social campaigns, election ads and advertisements. The native counterpart reklama is restricted to advertisements.

Declension


Scottish Gaelic

Noun

spot m (genitive singular spoit, plural spotan)

  1. spot, stain
  2. spot, place

Synonyms

  • (place): bad

Derived terms

  • spot dall

Spanish

Noun

spot m (plural spots)

  1. advert, ad

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English sport.

Noun

spot

  1. sport

Volapük

Noun

spot (nominative plural spots)

  1. sport

Declension


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