berth vs wharf what difference

what is difference between berth and wharf

English

Alternative forms

  • birth, byrth (obsolete)

Etymology

Origin obscure. Possibly from Middle English *berth (bearing, carriage), equivalent to bear +‎ -th. This would make it a doublet of birth.

Alternatively, from an alteration of Middle English beard, bærde (bearing, conduct), itself of obscure formation. Compare Old English ġebǣru (bearing, conduct, behaviour).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɜːθ/
  • (US) enPR: bûrth, IPA(key): /bɝθ/
  • Homophone: birth
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)θ

Noun

berth (plural berths)

  1. A fixed bunk for sleeping (in caravans, trains, etc).
  2. Room for maneuvering or safety. (Often used in the phrase a wide berth.)
  3. A space for a ship to moor or a vehicle to park.
  4. (nautical) A room in which a number of the officers or ship’s company mess and reside.
  5. A job or position, especially on a ship.
  6. (sports) Position or seed in a tournament bracket.
  7. (sports) position on the field of play

Translations

Verb

berth (third-person singular simple present berths, present participle berthing, simple past and past participle berthed)

  1. (transitive) to bring (a ship or vehicle) into its berth
  2. (transitive) to assign a berth (bunk or position) to

Translations


Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛrθ/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Brythonic *berθ, from Proto-Celtic *berxtos.

Adjective

berth (feminine singular berth, plural berthion, equative berthed, comparative berthach, superlative berthaf)

  1. (obsolete) fair, fine, beautiful

Derived terms

  • anferth (colossal, gargantuan)
  • prydferth (beautiful, handsome)

Mutation

Etymology 2

Noun

berth

  1. Soft mutation of perth (hedge).

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Middle English wharf, from Old English hwearf (heap, embankment, wharf); related to Old English hweorfan (to turn), Old Saxon hwerf (whence German Werft), Dutch werf, Old High German hwarb (a turn), hwerban (to turn), Old Norse hvarf (circle), and Ancient Greek καρπός (karpós, wrist).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: wôrf, IPA(key): /wɔɹf/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: wôf, IPA(key): /wɔːf/
  • (without the winewhine merger) enPR: hwôrf, IPA(key): /hwɔɹf/.
In New Zealand, even those who distinguish wine and whine are likely to pronounce as /wɔːf/.
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)f

Noun

wharf (plural wharves or wharfs)

  1. A man-made landing place for ships on a shore or river bank.
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      Commerce pushes its wharves into the sea.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, The Lady of Shalott
      Out upon the wharfs they came, / Knight and burgher, lord and dame.
  2. The bank of a river, or the shore of the sea.

Synonyms

  • (landing place): dock; quay

Hyponyms

  • (landing place): jetty; pier; staithe, staith (Northern England)

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

wharf (third-person singular simple present wharfs, present participle wharfing, simple past and past participle wharfed)

  1. (transitive) To secure by a wharf.
  2. (transitive) To place on a wharf.

See also

  • dock

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • wherf, wharfe, warrf, wharghfe

Etymology

From Old English hwearf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʍarf/

Noun

wharf (plural wharves)

  1. wharf

Derived terms

  • wharfage

Descendants

  • English: wharf
  • Scots: wharf

References

  • “wharf, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-12-12.

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