bespeak vs quest what difference

what is difference between bespeak and quest

English

Etymology

From Middle English bespeken, bispeken, from Old English *bespecan, besprecan (to speak about, speak against, accuse of, claim at law, complain), from Proto-Germanic *bisprekaną (to discuss, blame), equivalent to be- +‎ speak. Cognate with Scots bespeke (to beseech, speak or negotiate with), West Frisian besprekke (to discuss), Dutch bespreken (to discuss, review, debate), German besprechen (to discuss, review, talk about).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪˈspiːk/
  • Rhymes: -iːk

Verb

bespeak (third-person singular simple present bespeaks, present participle bespeaking, simple past bespoke or (archaic) bespake, past participle bespoken or (archaic) bespoke)

  1. (transitive) To speak about; tell of; relate; discuss.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, Volume 3, The Examiner, Number 44, page 244
      [They] bespoke dangers [] in order to scare the allies.
    • 2006, Janet Jaymes, Dirty Laundry: A Memoir:
      But to bespeak of a love, heavily weighed upon a heart, toward someone opposing those sentiments encourages foolish and embarrassing repercussions he will never know about.
  2. (transitive) To speak for beforehand; engage in advance; make arrangements for; order or reserve in advance.
    • 1819, Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
      concluding, naturally, that to gratify his avarice was to bespeak his favour
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, The Haunted House
      I walked on into the village, with the desertion of this house upon my mind, and I found the landlord of the little inn, sanding his door-step. I bespoke breakfast, and broached the subject of the house.
  3. (transitive) To stipulate, solicit, ask for, or request, as in a favour.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To forbode; foretell.
  5. (transitive, archaic, poetic) To speak to; address.
  6. (transitive) To betoken; show; indicate; foretell; suggest; allude to.
    • 1921, Printers’ Ink, Volume 114, Page 50:
      Are they telling your story vividly, strikingly, in designs that command attention, in colors that bespeak distinction?
  7. (intransitive) To speak up or out; exclaim; speak.

Derived terms

  • bespeaker
  • bespeaking
  • bespoke

Translations

Noun

bespeak (plural bespeaks)

  1. A request for a specific performance; a benefit performance, by a patron.
    • 1839, Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
      “By the bye, I’ve been thinking of bringing out that piece of yours on her bespeak night.”
      “When?”, asked Nicholas.
      “The night of her bespeak. Her benefit night. When her friends and patrons bespeak the play.”
      “Oh! I understand”, replied Nicholas.

References

Anagrams

  • bespake

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈspɪk/
  • (North Northern Scots) IPA(key): /bəˈspɛk/

Verb

bespeak (third-person singular present bespeaks, present participle bespeakin, past bespak, past participle bespoken)

  1. to bespeak


English

Etymology

From Middle English quest, queste; partly from Anglo-Norman queste, Old French queste (acquisition, search, hunt), and partly from their source, Latin quaesta (tribute, tax, inquiry, search), noun use of quaesita, the feminine past participle of quaerere (to ask, seek).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kwɛst/, enPR: kwĕst
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Noun

quest (plural quests)

  1. A journey or effort in pursuit of a goal (often lengthy, ambitious, or fervent); a mission.
  2. The act of seeking, or looking after anything; attempt to find or obtain; search; pursuit.
  3. (obsolete) Request; desire; solicitation.
    • Gad not abroad at every quest and call / Of an untrained hope or passion.
  4. (obsolete) A group of people making search or inquiry.
  5. (obsolete) Inquest; jury of inquest.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 46”
      To ‘cide this title is impanneled
      A quest of thoughts, all tenants to the heart,
      And by their verdict is determined
      The clear eye’s moiety and the dear heart’s part []

Derived terms

  • sidequest

Translations

Verb

quest (third-person singular simple present quests, present participle questing, simple past and past participle quested)

  1. To seek or pursue a goal; to undertake a mission or job.
  2. To search for; to examine.
    • 1634, Thomas Herbert, Description of the Persian Monarchy now beinge the Orientall Indyes, Iles and other ports of the Greater Asia and Africk
      Next day we quested in search of our caravan, and after some pains recovered it.
  3. (entomology, of a tick) To locate and attach to a host animal.

Anagrams

  • usteq

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • queste, qwest, qwhest

Etymology

Partly from Anglo-Norman queste, Old French queste, and partly from their source, Latin quaesta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwɛst(ə)/

Noun

quest (plural questes)

  1. (Late Middle English) A legal inquest or investigation; a session of court.
  2. (Late Middle English) A group or body of jurors
  3. (rare) A body of judges or other individuals commissioned to make a decision or verdict
  4. (rare) The decision or verdict reached by such a body of judges.
  5. (rare) A quest, mission, or search.
    1. (rare) The finding of prey by hunting dogs during a hunt.
    2. (rare, Late Middle English) The howling upon finding prey by hunting dogs during a hunt.
  6. (rare, Late Middle English) A petition or asking.

Related terms

  • conquest
  • enquest
  • questen
  • questioun
  • questor
  • request

Descendants

  • English: quest
  • Scots: quest

References

  • “quest(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-2.

Romagnol

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *eccu istu, from Latin eccum istum. Compare Italian questo.

Pronoun

quest (feminine singular questa)

  1. this one, this
    Quest l’è un mond zneno, e nost mond.

    This is a small world, our world.
    Questa l’è una cittadina bela.

    This is a beautiful city.

Romansch

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *eccu istu, from Latin eccum istum. Compare Italian questo.

Pronoun

quest

  1. this

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