bestow vs confer what difference

what is difference between bestow and confer

English

Etymology

From Middle English bestowen, bistowen; equivalent to be- (on, over, about) +‎ stow (to put something away).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɪˈstoʊ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɪˈstəʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Hyphenation: be‧stow

Verb

bestow (third-person singular simple present bestows, present participle bestowing, simple past and past participle bestowed)

  1. (transitive) To lay up in store; deposit for safe keeping; to stow or place; to put something somewhere.
    • 1611, King James Bible, Luke 12:17:
      And he thought within himself, saying, What shall I do, because I have no room where to bestow my fruits.
    • 1977, J.R.R. Tolkien, Of the Rings of Power, HarperCollins, page 358:
      Of the Three Rings that the Elves had preserved unsullied no open word was ever spoken among the Wise, and few even of the Eldar knew where they were bestowed.
  2. (transitive) To lodge, or find quarters for; provide with accommodation.
  3. (transitive) To dispose of.
    • 1615-17, Thomas Middleton et al., The Widow, in The Ancient British drama, edited by Robert Dodsley, Sir Walter Scott, published 1810:
      Here are blank warrants of all dispositions; give me but the name and nature of your malefactor, and I’ll bestow him according to his merits.
  4. (transitive) To give; confer; impart gratuitously; present something to someone or something, especially as a gift or honour.
    Medals were bestowed on the winning team.
    • 1831, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
      Soft tears again bedewed my cheeks, and I even raised my humid eyes with thankfulness towards the blessed sun which bestowed such joy upon me.
    • 2008, Illiad, Userfriendly.org, “The Large Hadron Collider Game”
      CERN bestows slush fund on the LHC. Take all pennies from the CERN space.
  5. (transitive) To give in marriage.
    • 1590-92, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act 1, Scene 1, lines 50-51:
      That is not to bestow my youngest daughter/ before I have a husband for the elder.
  6. (transitive) To apply; make use of; use; employ.
    • 1887, John Marston, Arthur Henry Bullen, The Works of John Marston:
      […] I determine to bestow Some time in learning languages abroad; […]
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To behave or deport.

Derived terms

  • bestowable
  • bestowage
  • bestowal
  • bestower
  • bestowment

Translations

Anagrams

  • betows, bowest


English

Etymology

From Early Modern English conferre, from Middle French conférer, from Old French conferer, from Latin cōnferō. Compare Dutch confereren (to confer), German konferieren (to confer), Danish konferere (to confer), Swedish konferera (to confer).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /kənˈfʌɹ/, [kʰə̥ɱˈfɚ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kənˈfɜː/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Verb

confer (third-person singular simple present confers, present participle conferring, simple past and past participle conferred)

  1. (transitive) To grant as a possession; to bestow. [from 16th c.]
    The college has conferred an honorary degree upon the visiting Prime Minister.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes
      Nor shall I count in hainous to enjoy
      The public marks of honour and reward
      Conferr’d upon me []
    • 2010, Andrew Rawnsley, The Observer, 7 Feb 2010:
      The special immunities that are conferred on MPs were framed with the essential purpose of allowing them to speak freely in parliament.
  2. (intransitive) To talk together, to consult, discuss; to deliberate. [from 16th c.]
    They were in a huddle, conferring about something.
    • 1974, “A Traveler’s Perils”, Time, 25 Mar 1974:
      Local buttons popped when Henry Kissinger visited Little Rock last month to confer with Fulbright on the Middle East oil talks.
  3. (obsolete) To compare. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1557 (book title):
      The Newe Testament … Conferred diligently with the Greke, and best approued translations.
    • 1661, Robert Boyle, The Second Essay, of Unsucceeding Experiments
      If we confer these observations with others of the like nature, we may find cause to rectify the general opinion.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To bring together; to collect, gather. [16th–17th c.]
  5. (obsolete) To contribute; to conduce. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      The closeness and compactness of the parts resting together doth much confer to the strength of the union.

Synonyms

  • (to grant, bestow, or contribute): afford

Derived terms

  • conferment
  • conferrable
  • conferral
  • agreement conferring jurisdiction

Related terms

  • cf, cf.
  • conference
  • collate
  • collation

Translations


Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkon.fer/, [ˈkõːfɛɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈkon.fer/, [ˈkɔnfɛr]

Verb

cōnfer

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cōnferō. Often abbreviated cf and used to mean “compare with”.

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