bet vs count what difference

what is difference between bet and count

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From 16th-century criminal slang, likely from abet or Old English bætan (to make better); or from Old French abeter (to entice), from a- (to) + beter (hound on, urge, to bait); but in either case ultimately from Proto-Germanic. More at abet.

Noun

bet (plural bets)

  1. A wager, an agreement between two parties that a stake (usually money) will be paid by the loser to the winner (the winner being the one who correctly forecast the outcome of an event).
  2. A degree of certainty.
Translations

Verb

bet (third-person singular simple present bets, present participle betting, simple past and past participle bet or betted)

  1. To stake or pledge upon the outcome of an event; to wager.
    • 1858, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., “The Deacon’s Masterpiece or The Wonderful One-Hoss Shay
      I’ll bet you two to one I’ll make him do it.
  2. To be sure of something; to be able to count on something.
  3. (poker) To place money into the pot in order to require others do the same, usually only used for the first person to place money in the pot on each round.
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

bet (slang, chiefly US)

  1. Expression of general agreement or acceptance.
  2. Exclamation indicating acceptance of a challenge or an absurd proposal.
  3. Exclamation of joy at good fortune.

Etymology 2

From Hebrew בית(béyt)

Noun

bet

  1. Alternative form of beth

Etymology 3

Abbreviation.

Preposition

bet

  1. (knitting) between

Anagrams

  • BTE, TEB

Bislama

Etymology 1

From English bait.

Noun

bet

  1. bait

Etymology 2

From English bet

Verb

bet

  1. to gamble

Brokskat

Verb

bet

  1. continued

Crimean Tatar

Noun

bet

  1. face
  2. side, direction
  3. page

Declension

Synonyms

  • yüz, çıray (face)
  • saife (page)

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[7], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Finnish

Noun

bet

  1. beth (second letter of the Hebrew and Phoenician scripts and the Northwest Semitic abjad)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beːt/
  • Homophone: Beet

Verb

bet

  1. singular imperative of beten

Usage notes

The form bete is more common.


Italian

Etymology

From Hebrew בַּיִ״ת(báyiṯ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛt/
  • Hyphenation: bèt

Noun

bet f (invariable)

  1. beth
    1. The name of the Phoenician-script letter ????
    2. The name of the Hebrew script letter ב

Related terms

  • beta

Anagrams

  • Tbe.

Latgalian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside). Cognates include Latvian bet and Lithuanian bet. Not related to English but.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæt/

Conjunction

bet

  1. but

References

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Baltic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside, without) (whence also Latvian preposition bez, q.v.), to which an old particle -t was added, visible also in the Latvian particle it and the adverb šeit (here) (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian bèt, Sudovian bat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bɛt]

Conjunction

bet

  1. adversative conjunction, used to express contrast or opposition; but
  2. (with tomēr) expressing contrast, opposition with a nuance of concession; yet, but still
  3. (with gan) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but, but instead
  4. (with ne, nevis) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but not
  5. (with a preceding negative clause) (expressing strong contrast, opposition)
  6. (with gan in the preceding sentence) expressing opposition to the preceding event, which did not achieve its goal, was frustrated (indeed) … but
  7. used to express an inconsistency or contradiction between two clauses, or a frustrated expectation
  8. used to connect a sentence to the preceding context, indicating an inconsistency or contradiction, or a frustrated expectation; But…
  9. used to connect a subordinate clause indicating concession to a main clause; but
  10. (in combinations like ne vien …, bet arī, ne tikai …, bet arī, ne tikvien …, bet arī) used to coordinate clause elements; not only …, but also
  11. (with tad) used to strengthen emotionally the idea expressed in a sentence as opposed to some expectation but…!, but then…!
  12. (used as a noun) obstacle, hindrance, “but”
    šim pasākumam ir savs “bet — this undertaking has its own but (= there is an obstacle to it)

Usage notes

Latvian bet is to some extent a “false friend” of English but, since it is used not only in adversative (but) contexts, but also in certain additive (and) contexts, when there is the idea of contrast (while…) between two situations, very much like Russian а (a): es strādāju, bet mana sieva lasa grāmatu “I am working, and (= while) my wife is reading a book” (cf. Russian я работаю, а моя жена читает книгу). A more strongly adversative word, used to stress contrast, contradiction, or inconsistency, is taču, which would correspond to Russian но (no).

Synonyms

  • taču
  • tomēr

References


Lithuanian

Etymology

Cognate with Latvian bet. From (without) + particle -t. This particle comes from (let, may it be), compare nèt (even) < nete.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʲɛt/

Conjunction

bèt

  1. (adversative) but, yet, though (introduces an idea contrary to or a concession to the previous statement)
    Nóriu, bèt negaliù. – I want to, but I can’t.
    Paskutìnis, bèt prasčiáusias – Last but not least

Particle

bet (unstressed)

  1. (in conjunction with interrogative words) any-, -ever (suggesting the complement is not important or irrelevant)
    bet kadà – whenever, anytime

    Jaučiúosi geriaũ neĩ bet kadà! – I feel better than ever!
    bet kurìs – whichever, any

    Bet kuriuõ ãtveju àš darýsiu polìtinę karjèrą – I’ll make it in politics, no matter what it takes.

Derived terms


Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch bit.(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Is this bi+met?”)

Preposition

bet

  1. with, together with
    Synonym: met
  2. with, by means of, using
    Synonym: met

Etymology 2

Adverb

bet

  1. Alternative form of bat

Etymology 3

From bi + te. Compare Middle High German biz (German bis).

Preposition

bet

  1. (rare) up to

Further reading

  • “bet (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “bet (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “bet (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “bet (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bette, bett, bæt

Etymology

From Old English bet, from Proto-Germanic *batiz. In adverbial senses, later supplemented by bettre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛt/

Adverb

bet

  1. comparative degree of wel
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.

Adjective

bet (only in predicates)

  1. comparative degree of wel
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)

Noun

bet

  1. Something or someone which is more wel (i.e. better).
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj. as n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • beit

Verb

bet

  1. simple past of bite

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/

Adverb

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Adverb

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛt/

Etymology 1

From German Bett, from Middle High German bet, bette, from Old High German betti, from Proto-Germanic *badją, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰh₂-.

Noun

bet m inan

  1. baby’s sleeping bag
    Synonym: becik
Declension
Derived terms
  • (noun) becik
Related terms
  • (noun) becikowe

Etymology 2

From Hebrew בית(béyt).

Noun

bet m inan (indeclinable)

  1. beth (Aramaic and Hebrew letter)

Further reading

  • bet in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bet in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbet/, [ˈbet̪]

Noun

bet f (plural bet)

  1. beth; the Hebrew letter ב

Swedish

Verb

bet

  1. past tense of bita.

Tok Pisin

Etymology 1

From English bed.

Noun

bet

  1. bed

Etymology 2

From English bet.

Noun

bet

  1. bet

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Noun

bet n (plural bet)

  1. bed

Volapük

Noun

bet (nominative plural bets)

  1. flower bed

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse bit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/, /beːt/

Noun

bet n

  1. the crossbar which joins the two drying racks at a barn

Noun

bet n

  1. fleas and lice
  2. the property to bite
  3. mark after bite

Zhuang

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *peːtᴰ (eight), from Middle Chinese (MC pˠɛt̚, “eight”). Cognate with Thai แปด (bpɛ̀ɛt), Tai Dam ꪵꪜꪒ, Lao ແປດ (pǣt), ᦶᦔᧆᧈ (ṗaed1), Shan ပႅတ်ႇ (pàet), Tai Nüa ᥙᥦᥖᥱ (pǎet), Ahom ???????????????? (pit), Bouyei beedt. Doublet of bat.

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /peːt˧˥/
  • Tone numbers: bet7
  • Hyphenation: bet

Numeral

bet (old orthography bet)

  1. eight
    Synonym: (in compounds) bat

Zoogocho Zapotec

Etymology

From Proto-Zapotec *kw-eʔtti(k), from Proto-Zapotecan *kw-eʔtti(k).

Noun

bet

  1. skunk

References

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[8] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 12


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kaʊnt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnt

Etymology 1

From Middle English counten, borrowed from Anglo-Norman conter, from Old French conter (add up; tell a story), from Latin computare, present active infinitive of computō (I compute). Displaced native Middle English tellen (to count) (from Old English tellan) and Middle English rimen (to count, enumerate) (from Old English rīman). Doublet of compute.

Verb

count (third-person singular simple present counts, present participle counting, simple past and past participle counted)

  1. (intransitive) To recite numbers in sequence.
  2. (transitive) To determine the number (of objects in a group).
  3. (intransitive) To be of significance; to matter.
  4. (intransitive) To be an example of something: often followed by as and an indefinite noun.
    • 1886, John Addington Symonds, Sir Philip Sidney
      This excellent man [] counted among the best and wisest of English statesmen.
  5. (transitive) To consider something an example of something.
  6. (obsolete) To take account or note (of).
  7. (Britain, law) To plead orally; to argue a matter in court; to recite a count.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (determine the number of objects in a group): enumerate, number; see also Thesaurus:count
Derived terms
Related terms
  • compute
Translations

Noun

count (plural counts)

  1. The act of counting or tallying a quantity.
  2. The result of a tally that reveals the number of items in a set; a quantity counted.
  3. A countdown.
  4. (law) A charge of misconduct brought in a legal proceeding.
  5. (baseball) The number of balls and strikes, respectively, on a batter’s in-progress plate appearance.
  6. (obsolete) An object of interest or account; value; estimation.
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

count (not comparable)

  1. (linguistics, grammar) Countable.

Etymology 2

From Middle English counte, from Anglo-Norman conte and Old French comte (count), from Latin comes (companion) (more specifically derived from its accusative form comitem) in the sense of “noble fighting alongside the king”. Doublet of comes and comte.

Noun

count (plural counts)

  1. The male ruler of a county.
  2. A nobleman holding a rank intermediate between dukes and barons.
  3. (entomology) Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the genus Tanaecia. Other butterflies in this genus are called earls and viscounts.
Synonyms
  • (English counts): earl
  • (French counts): comte
  • (Italian counts): conte
  • (German counts): graf
Derived terms
  • viscount
  • count palatine, count palatinate
Related terms
  • (female form or wife): countess, contessa
  • (adjectival form): comital
  • (related titles): baron, don, duke, earl, lord, prince
Translations

Anagrams

  • no-cut

Middle English

Noun

count

  1. Alternative form of cunte

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