bet vs play what difference

what is difference between bet and play

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From 16th-century criminal slang, likely from abet or Old English bætan (to make better); or from Old French abeter (to entice), from a- (to) + beter (hound on, urge, to bait); but in either case ultimately from Proto-Germanic. More at abet.

Noun

bet (plural bets)

  1. A wager, an agreement between two parties that a stake (usually money) will be paid by the loser to the winner (the winner being the one who correctly forecast the outcome of an event).
  2. A degree of certainty.
Translations

Verb

bet (third-person singular simple present bets, present participle betting, simple past and past participle bet or betted)

  1. To stake or pledge upon the outcome of an event; to wager.
    • 1858, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., “The Deacon’s Masterpiece or The Wonderful One-Hoss Shay
      I’ll bet you two to one I’ll make him do it.
  2. To be sure of something; to be able to count on something.
  3. (poker) To place money into the pot in order to require others do the same, usually only used for the first person to place money in the pot on each round.
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

bet (slang, chiefly US)

  1. Expression of general agreement or acceptance.
  2. Exclamation indicating acceptance of a challenge or an absurd proposal.
  3. Exclamation of joy at good fortune.

Etymology 2

From Hebrew בית(béyt)

Noun

bet

  1. Alternative form of beth

Etymology 3

Abbreviation.

Preposition

bet

  1. (knitting) between

Anagrams

  • BTE, TEB

Bislama

Etymology 1

From English bait.

Noun

bet

  1. bait

Etymology 2

From English bet

Verb

bet

  1. to gamble

Brokskat

Verb

bet

  1. continued

Crimean Tatar

Noun

bet

  1. face
  2. side, direction
  3. page

Declension

Synonyms

  • yüz, çıray (face)
  • saife (page)

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[7], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Finnish

Noun

bet

  1. beth (second letter of the Hebrew and Phoenician scripts and the Northwest Semitic abjad)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beːt/
  • Homophone: Beet

Verb

bet

  1. singular imperative of beten

Usage notes

The form bete is more common.


Italian

Etymology

From Hebrew בַּיִ״ת(báyiṯ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛt/
  • Hyphenation: bèt

Noun

bet f (invariable)

  1. beth
    1. The name of the Phoenician-script letter ????
    2. The name of the Hebrew script letter ב

Related terms

  • beta

Anagrams

  • Tbe.

Latgalian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside). Cognates include Latvian bet and Lithuanian bet. Not related to English but.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæt/

Conjunction

bet

  1. but

References

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Baltic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside, without) (whence also Latvian preposition bez, q.v.), to which an old particle -t was added, visible also in the Latvian particle it and the adverb šeit (here) (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian bèt, Sudovian bat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bɛt]

Conjunction

bet

  1. adversative conjunction, used to express contrast or opposition; but
  2. (with tomēr) expressing contrast, opposition with a nuance of concession; yet, but still
  3. (with gan) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but, but instead
  4. (with ne, nevis) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but not
  5. (with a preceding negative clause) (expressing strong contrast, opposition)
  6. (with gan in the preceding sentence) expressing opposition to the preceding event, which did not achieve its goal, was frustrated (indeed) … but
  7. used to express an inconsistency or contradiction between two clauses, or a frustrated expectation
  8. used to connect a sentence to the preceding context, indicating an inconsistency or contradiction, or a frustrated expectation; But…
  9. used to connect a subordinate clause indicating concession to a main clause; but
  10. (in combinations like ne vien …, bet arī, ne tikai …, bet arī, ne tikvien …, bet arī) used to coordinate clause elements; not only …, but also
  11. (with tad) used to strengthen emotionally the idea expressed in a sentence as opposed to some expectation but…!, but then…!
  12. (used as a noun) obstacle, hindrance, “but”
    šim pasākumam ir savs “bet — this undertaking has its own but (= there is an obstacle to it)

Usage notes

Latvian bet is to some extent a “false friend” of English but, since it is used not only in adversative (but) contexts, but also in certain additive (and) contexts, when there is the idea of contrast (while…) between two situations, very much like Russian а (a): es strādāju, bet mana sieva lasa grāmatu “I am working, and (= while) my wife is reading a book” (cf. Russian я работаю, а моя жена читает книгу). A more strongly adversative word, used to stress contrast, contradiction, or inconsistency, is taču, which would correspond to Russian но (no).

Synonyms

  • taču
  • tomēr

References


Lithuanian

Etymology

Cognate with Latvian bet. From (without) + particle -t. This particle comes from (let, may it be), compare nèt (even) < nete.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʲɛt/

Conjunction

bèt

  1. (adversative) but, yet, though (introduces an idea contrary to or a concession to the previous statement)
    Nóriu, bèt negaliù. – I want to, but I can’t.
    Paskutìnis, bèt prasčiáusias – Last but not least

Particle

bet (unstressed)

  1. (in conjunction with interrogative words) any-, -ever (suggesting the complement is not important or irrelevant)
    bet kadà – whenever, anytime

    Jaučiúosi geriaũ neĩ bet kadà! – I feel better than ever!
    bet kurìs – whichever, any

    Bet kuriuõ ãtveju àš darýsiu polìtinę karjèrą – I’ll make it in politics, no matter what it takes.

Derived terms


Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch bit.(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Is this bi+met?”)

Preposition

bet

  1. with, together with
    Synonym: met
  2. with, by means of, using
    Synonym: met

Etymology 2

Adverb

bet

  1. Alternative form of bat

Etymology 3

From bi + te. Compare Middle High German biz (German bis).

Preposition

bet

  1. (rare) up to

Further reading

  • “bet (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “bet (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “bet (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “bet (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bette, bett, bæt

Etymology

From Old English bet, from Proto-Germanic *batiz. In adverbial senses, later supplemented by bettre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛt/

Adverb

bet

  1. comparative degree of wel
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.

Adjective

bet (only in predicates)

  1. comparative degree of wel
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)

Noun

bet

  1. Something or someone which is more wel (i.e. better).
References
  • “bet, adv. & adj. as n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-17.
Descendants
  • English: bet (obsolete)

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • beit

Verb

bet

  1. simple past of bite

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/

Adverb

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Adverb

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛt/

Etymology 1

From German Bett, from Middle High German bet, bette, from Old High German betti, from Proto-Germanic *badją, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰh₂-.

Noun

bet m inan

  1. baby’s sleeping bag
    Synonym: becik
Declension
Derived terms
  • (noun) becik
Related terms
  • (noun) becikowe

Etymology 2

From Hebrew בית(béyt).

Noun

bet m inan (indeclinable)

  1. beth (Aramaic and Hebrew letter)

Further reading

  • bet in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bet in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbet/, [ˈbet̪]

Noun

bet f (plural bet)

  1. beth; the Hebrew letter ב

Swedish

Verb

bet

  1. past tense of bita.

Tok Pisin

Etymology 1

From English bed.

Noun

bet

  1. bed

Etymology 2

From English bet.

Noun

bet

  1. bet

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Noun

bet n (plural bet)

  1. bed

Volapük

Noun

bet (nominative plural bets)

  1. flower bed

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse bit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bet/, /beːt/

Noun

bet n

  1. the crossbar which joins the two drying racks at a barn

Noun

bet n

  1. fleas and lice
  2. the property to bite
  3. mark after bite

Zhuang

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *peːtᴰ (eight), from Middle Chinese (MC pˠɛt̚, “eight”). Cognate with Thai แปด (bpɛ̀ɛt), Tai Dam ꪵꪜꪒ, Lao ແປດ (pǣt), ᦶᦔᧆᧈ (ṗaed1), Shan ပႅတ်ႇ (pàet), Tai Nüa ᥙᥦᥖᥱ (pǎet), Ahom ???????????????? (pit), Bouyei beedt. Doublet of bat.

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /peːt˧˥/
  • Tone numbers: bet7
  • Hyphenation: bet

Numeral

bet (old orthography bet)

  1. eight
    Synonym: (in compounds) bat

Zoogocho Zapotec

Etymology

From Proto-Zapotec *kw-eʔtti(k), from Proto-Zapotecan *kw-eʔtti(k).

Noun

bet

  1. skunk

References

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[8] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 12


English

Etymology

From Middle English pleyen, playen, pleȝen, plæien, also Middle English plaȝen, plawen (compare English plaw), from Old English pleġan, pleoġan, plæġan, and Old English plegian, pleagian, plagian (to play, exercise, etc.), from Proto-West Germanic *plehan (to care about, be concerned with) and Proto-West Germanic *plegōn (to engage, move); both perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *blek- (to move, move about), from Proto-Indo-European *bal- (compare Ancient Greek βλύω (blúō), βλύζω (blúzō, I gush out, spring), Sanskrit बल्बलीति (balbalīti, it whirls, twirls)). Cognate with Scots play (to act or move briskly, cause to move, stir), Saterland Frisian pleegje (to look after, care for, maintain), West Frisian pleegje, pliigje (to commit, perform, bedrive), Middle Dutch pleyen (“to dance, leap for joy, rejoice, be glad”; compare Modern Dutch pleien (to play a particular children’s game)), Dutch plegen (to commit, bedrive, practice), German pflegen (to care for, be concerned with, attend to, tend). Related also to Old English plēon (to risk, endanger). More at plight, pledge.

The noun is from Middle English pleye, from Old English plæġ, plega, plæġa (play, quick [ motion, movement, exercise; (athletic) sport, game; festivity, drama; battle; gear for games, an implement for a game; clapping with the hands, applause), deverbative of plegian (to play); see above.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: plā, IPA(key): /pleɪ/, [pl̥eɪ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

play (third-person singular simple present plays, present participle playing, simple past and past participle played)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a manner such that one has fun; to engage in activities expressly for the purpose of recreation or entertainment.
    • 2003, Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont et al. (eds.), Joining Society: Social Interaction and Learning in Adolescence and Youth, Cambridge Univ. Press, p.52:
      We had to play for an hour, so that meant that we didn’t have time to play and joke around.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To perform in (a sport); to participate in (a game).
    Hypernym: try
    Hyponym: replay
    1. (transitive) To compete against, in a game.
      We’re playing one of the top teams in the next round.
    2. (transitive) (in the scoring of games and sports) To be the opposing score to.
      Look at the score now … 23 plays 8!
  3. (intransitive) To take part in amorous activity; to make love.
    Synonyms: get it on, make out, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  4. To gamble.
    • 1791, Charlotte Smith, Celestina, Broadview 2004, p. 407:
      “I play, comparatively, very little; I don’t drink a fifth part so much as half the people I live with; and I reckon myself, upon the whole, a very orderly, sober fellow.”
  5. (transitive) To act as the indicated role, especially in a performance.
    • 1984, Chris Robinson, commercial for Vicks Formula 44:
  6. (heading, transitive, intransitive) To produce music or theatre.
    1. (intransitive, of a music) To produce music.
      Synonyms: cook, jam; see also Thesaurus:play music
      • 2007, Dan Erlewine, Guitar Player Repair Guide →ISBN, page 220:
        If your guitar plays well on fretted strings but annoys you on the open ones, the nut’s probably worn out.
    2. (intransitive, especially of a person) To produce music using a musical instrument.
    3. (transitive, especially of a person) To produce music (or a specified song or musical style) using (a specified musical instrument).
    4. (transitive, ergative) To use a device to watch or listen to the indicated recording.
    5. (intransitive, of a theatrical performance) To be performed; (or of a film) to be shown.
    6. (transitive, of a theatrical company or band, etc.) To perform in or at; to give performances in or at.
      • 2008, My Life: From Normandy to Hockeytown →ISBN, p.30:
        I got a hold of Louis (Satchmo) Armstrong’s agent and I explained to him on the phone that, “I know you’re playing London on Wednesday night. Why don’t you come and play the Arena in Windsor on Saturday night?”
    7. (transitive) To act or perform (a play).
  7. (heading) To behave in a particular way.
    1. (copulative) Contrary to fact, to give an appearance of being.
      • 1985, Sharon S. Brehm, Intimate Relationships:
        Playing hard to get is not the same as slamming the door in someone’s face.
      • 1996, Michael P. Malone, James J Hill: Empire Builder of the Northwest:
        Now, surveying his final link, he had the nice advantage of being able to play coy with established port cities that desperately wanted his proven railroad.
      • 2003, John U. Ogbu, Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement, p.194:
        Instead, they played dumb, remained silent, and did their classwork.
    2. (intransitive) To act with levity or thoughtlessness; to trifle; to be careless.
    3. (intransitive) To act; to behave; to practice deception.
    4. (transitive) To bring into sportive or wanton action; to exhibit in action; to execute.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To move in any manner; especially, to move regularly with alternate or reciprocating motion; to operate.
    • 1705, George Cheyne, Philosophical Principles of Religion:
      The heart beats, the blood circulates, the lungs play.
    • The colonel and his sponsor made a queer contrast: Greystone [the sponsor] long and stringy, with a face that seemed as if a cold wind was eternally playing on it.
  9. (intransitive) To move to and fro.
    • The setting sun / Plays on their shining arms and burnished helmets.
  10. (transitive) To put in action or motion.
  11. (transitive) To keep in play, as a hooked fish in order to land it.
  12. (transitive, colloquial) To manipulate, deceive, or swindle someone.
    Synonym: defraud

Conjugation

Translations

Noun

play (countable and uncountable, plural plays)

  1. (uncountable, formerly countable) Activity for amusement only, especially among the young.
    • 1803, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey
      She was fond of all boys’ plays, and greatly preferred cricket [] to dolls []
  2. (uncountable) Similar activity in young animals, as they explore their environment and learn new skills.
  3. (uncountable) The conduct, or course, of a game.
  4. (uncountable) An individual’s performance in a sport or game.
  5. (countable) A short sequence of action within a game.
  6. (countable, turn-based games) An action carried out when it is one’s turn to play.
    Synonym: move
    • 2009, Joe Edley, John Williams, Everything Scrabble: Third Edition (page 85)
      AWARD is better than either WARED or WADER. However, there’s an even better play! If you have looked at the two-to-make-three letter list, you may have noticed the word AWA.
  7. (countable) A literary composition, intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue.
    Synonyms: drama; see also Thesaurus:drama
  8. (countable) A theatrical performance featuring actors.
  9. (countable) An attempt to move forward, as in a plan or strategy, for example by a business, investor, or political party.
  10. (countable) A geological formation that contains an accumulation or prospect of hydrocarbons or other resources.
  11. (uncountable) The extent to which a part of a mechanism can move freely.
  12. (uncountable, informal) Sexual activity or sexual role-playing.
    • 1996, “toptigger”, (on Internet newsgroup alt.personals.spanking.punishment)
      Palm Springs M seeks sane F 4 safe bdsm play
  13. (countable) An instance of watching or listening to digital media.
    Synonyms: (of visual media) view, (of audio) listen
  14. (countable) A button that, when pressed, causes media to be played.
  15. (archaic, now usually in compounds) Activity relating to martial combat or fighting.
    handplay, swordplay

Translations

Derived terms

See also

  • outdoor

Further reading

  • play on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • play at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • play in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • paly, pyla

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English play, possibly via Japanese プレイ (purei).

Pronunciation

Suffix

play

  1. play (sexual roleplaying)
    羞恥play / 羞耻play  ―  xiūchǐ play  ―  erotic humiliation
    女裝play / 女装play  ―  nǚzhuāng play  ―  crossdressing
    各種奇怪的play / 各种奇怪的play  ―  gèzhǒng qíguài de play  ―  all kinds of strange sexual roleplaying

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English play.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈplɛj/, /ˈplej/

Noun

play m (invariable)

  1. play (theatrical performance; start key)

Interjection

play

  1. used to announce the start a game of tennis

References


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English play.

Noun

play m (plural playes)

  1. play (button)

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