betoken vs signal what difference

what is difference between betoken and signal

English

Etymology

From Middle English bitoknen, bitacnen, from Old English betācnian (to betoken, signify, designate). Equivalent to be- +‎ token. Cognate with Dutch betekenen (to mean, signify), German bezeichnen (to call, designate), Swedish beteckna (to represent, designate, indicate).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪˈtoʊ.kən/
  • Rhymes: -əʊkən

Verb

betoken (third-person singular simple present betokens, present participle betokening, simple past and past participle betokened)

  1. (transitive) To signify by some visible object; show by signs or tokens.
    • 1557: Robert Recorde, The whetstone of witte, whiche is the seconde parte of Arithmetike : containyng the xtraction of Rootes : The Cossike practise, with the rule of Equation : and the workes of Surde Nombers.ʀ, page unknown (Ihon Kyngstone)
      There be other 2 signes in often use of which the first is made thus + and betokeneth more : the other is thus made – and betokeneth lesse.
  2. (transitive) To foreshow by present signs; indicate something future by that which is seen or known.
    • 1853: Virgil, Charles Anthon, LL.D. [tr.], Æneïd of Virgil: With English Notes, Critical and Explanatory, a Metrical Clavis: And an Historical, Geographical, and Mythological Index, page 474 (Harper & Brothers, 329 & 331 Pearl Street, Franklin Square, New York)
      “ Ah ! hospitable land, thou (nevertheless) betokenest war,” i. e., although hospitable, thou nevertheless betokenest war. — Bello.

Synonyms

  • (signify): indicate, mark, note
  • (foreshow): portend, presage, forebode

Translations

References

  • betoken in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


English

Alternative forms

  • signall

Etymology

From Old French segnal, seignal or Medieval Latin signāle; noun use of the neuter of Late Latin signālis, from Latin signum; verb use from 1805, as a shortened from signalize (1650s).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sĭgʹnəl, IPA(key): /ˈsɪɡnəl/
  • Hyphenation: sig‧nal

Noun

signal (plural signals)

  1. A sequence of states representing an encoded message in a communication channel.
  2. Any variation of a quantity or change in an entity over time that conveys information upon detection.
  3. A sign made to give notice of some occurrence, command, or danger, or to indicate the start of a concerted action.
  4. An on-off light, semaphore, or other device used to give an indication to another person.
  5. (of a radio, TV, telephone, internet, etc.) An electromagnetic action, normally a voltage that is a function of time, that conveys the information of the radio or TV program or of communication with another party.
    My mobile phone can’t get a signal in the railway station.
  6. An action, change or process done to convey information and thus reduce uncertainty.
  7. A token; an indication; a foreshadowing; a sign.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year
      There was not the least signal of the calamity to be seen.
  8. Useful information, as opposed to noise.
  9. (computing, Unix) A simple interprocess communication used to notify a process or thread of an occurrence.
  10. (biochemistry) A signalling interaction between cells

Antonyms

  • (useful information): noise

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • tocsin

Verb

signal (third-person singular simple present signals, present participle (UK) signalling or (US) signaling, simple past and past participle (UK) signalled or (US) signaled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To indicate; to convey or communicate by a signal.
  2. (transitive) To communicate with (a person or system) by a signal.
    Seeing the flames, he ran to the control room and signalled headquarters.

Derived terms

  • missignal
  • oversignal
  • undersignal

Translations

Adjective

signal (not comparable)

  1. Standing above others in rank, importance, or achievement.
    a signal exploit; a signal service; a signal act of benevolence

Synonyms

  • eminent, noteworthy, significant; see also Thesaurus:important or Thesaurus:notable

Related terms

  • signature (adjective)

Anagrams

  • Saling, algins, aligns, lasing, liangs, lingas

Danish

Etymology

From Medieval Latin signale

Noun

signal n (singular definite signalet, plural indefinite signaler)

  1. a signal

References

  • “signal” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

Re-latinization of Old French segnal, from Medieval Latin signale, from Late Latin signālis, from Latin signum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si.ɲal/

Noun

signal m (plural signaux)

  1. signal

Derived terms

  • écrevisse signal

Related terms

  • signe

Further reading

  • “signal” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • lignas

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Medieval Latin signale

Noun

signal n (definite singular signalet, indefinite plural signal or signaler, definite plural signala or signalene)

  1. a signal

Derived terms

References

  • “signal” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin signale

Noun

signal n (definite singular signalet, indefinite plural signal, definite plural signala)

  1. a signal

Derived terms

References

  • “signal” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

From French signal.

Noun

signal n (plural signale)

  1. signal

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German Signal, from Medieval Latin signale, from Latin signum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sǐɡnaːl/
  • Hyphenation: sig‧nal

Noun

sìgnāl m (Cyrillic spelling сѝгна̄л)

  1. signal

Declension

References

  • “signal” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

signal c

  1. a signal

Declension

Anagrams

  • inslag, ligans, singla, slinga

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Old French segnal, seignal or Medieval Latin signāle, noun use of the neuter of Late Latin signālis, from Latin signum.

Pronunciation

Noun

signal n (plural signale)

  1. signal

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