betray vs sell what difference

what is difference between betray and sell

English

Etymology

From Middle English betrayen, betraien, equivalent to be- +‎ tray (to betray). English tray (to betray) derives from Middle English traien, from Old French traïr (to commit treason, betray), from Latin trādō (to deliver, give over). Compare also traitor, treason, tradition. In English betrayen meant solely to commit an act of treason against someone; deliver someone treasonably to an enemy; betray one’s trust; deceive, mislead. The modern sense to disclose, discover, reveal unintentionally is due to influence from or merger with English bewray (to reveal, divulge), which is similar in sound and meaning. The similarity with German betrügen, Dutch bedriegen, from Proto-West Germanic *bidreugan (to betray, deceive), is coincidental.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈtɹeɪ/, /bɪˈtɹeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

betray (third-person singular simple present betrays, present participle betraying, simple past and past participle betrayed)

  1. (transitive) To deliver into the hands of an enemy by treachery or fraud, in violation of trust; to give up treacherously or faithlessly.
    an officer betrayed the city
  2. (transitive) To prove faithless or treacherous to, as to a trust or one who trusts; to be false to; to deceive.
    to betray a person or a cause
    Quresh betrayed Sunil to marry Nuzhat.
    My eyes have been betraying me since I turned sixty.
  3. (transitive) To violate the confidence of, by disclosing a secret, or that which one is bound in honor not to make known.
  4. (transitive) To disclose or indicate, for example something which prudence would conceal; to reveal unintentionally.
    Though he had lived in England for many years, a faint accent betrayed his Swedish origin.
  5. (transitive) To mislead; to expose to inconvenience not foreseen; to lead into error or sin.
  6. (transitive) To lead astray; to seduce (as under promise of marriage) and then abandon.

Synonyms

  • (to prove faithless or treacherous): sell

Derived terms

  • betrayer
  • betrayal (noun)

Translations

Further reading

  • betray in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • betray in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • baryte


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl
  • Homophone: cell

Etymology 1

From Middle English sellen, from Old English sellan (give; give up for money), from Proto-West Germanic *salljan, from Proto-Germanic *saljaną, from Proto-Indo-European *selh₁-. Compare Danish sælge, Swedish sälja, Icelandic selja.

Verb

sell (third-person singular simple present sells, present participle selling, simple past and past participle sold)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, ditransitive) To transfer goods or provide services in exchange for money.
    • If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor.
  2. (ergative) To be sold.
  3. To promote a product or service.
    • 2016, “The Fetal Kick Catalyst”, The Big Bang Theory
      Howard: You’re gonna feel terrible when I’m in a wheelchair. Which, by the way, would fit easily in the back of this award-winning minivan.
      Bernadette: Fine, we’ll go to the E.R. Just stop selling me on the van.
      Howard: You’re right. It sells itself.
  4. To promote a particular viewpoint.
  5. To betray for money or other things.
  6. (slang) To trick, cheat, or manipulate someone.
  7. (professional wrestling, slang) To pretend that an opponent’s blows or maneuvers are causing legitimate injury; to act.
Synonyms
  • peddle
Antonyms
  • buy
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Chinese Pidgin English: sellum, 些林
  • Sranan Tongo: seri
Translations

Noun

sell (plural sells)

  1. An act of selling.
    This is going to be a tough sell.
  2. An easy task.
  3. (colloquial, dated) An imposition, a cheat; a hoax; a disappointment; anything occasioning a loss of pride or dignity.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, ch. 12
      “Of course a miracle may happen, and you may be a great painter, but you must confess the chances are a million to one against it. It’ll be an awful sell if at the end you have to acknowledge you’ve made a hash of it.”
    • 1922, Katherine Mansfield, The Doll’s House (Selected Stories, Oxford World’s Classics paperback 2002, 354)
      What a sell for Lena!

See also

  • sale

Etymology 2

From French selle, from Latin sella.

Alternative forms

  • selle (obsolete)

Noun

sell (plural sells)

  1. (obsolete) A seat or stool.
  2. (archaic) A saddle.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.ii:
      turning to that place, in which whyleare / He left his loftie steed with golden sell, / And goodly gorgeous barbes, him found not theare […].

Etymology 3

From Old Saxon seill or Old Norse seil. Cognate with Dutch zeel (rope), German Seil (rope).

Noun

sell (plural sells)

  1. (regional, obsolete) A rope (usually for tying up cattle, but can also mean any sort of rope).

Derived terms

  • bowsell

References

  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Anagrams

  • ELLs, Ells, ells

Breton

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛl/

Noun

sell m

  1. look, glance

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Cognate to German selbig (the same (one)).

Pronoun

sell

  1. that one

Determiner

sell

  1. that
    • 1954, Albert F. Buffington, A Pennsylvania German grammar, pages 32 and 81:
      sell Haus datt driwwe

      that house over there
      []
      In sellem alde Glaawe maag en bissel Waahret schtecke.

      In that old belief there may be a bit of truth.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:sell.

Inflection

References

  • Earl C Haag, Pennsylvania German Reader and Grammar (2010), page 204

Scots

Etymology

From Old English sellan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛl/

Verb

sell (third-person singular present sells, present participle sellin, past sellt or sauld, past participle sellt or sauld)

  1. To sell.

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse sil, a word also recorded in Norway as sel, in Sweden as silder, sälder, standard Swedish sel, from the root of Old Norse seinn and síð.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sel], [séːɭ]
    • Rhymes: -el, -éːl

Noun

sĕll n (definite singular sellä, definite plural sella or selja)

  1. pool, calm water (occurring in the course of a stream)
    sellä gjär ’n mil langt

    The calm water at that place stretches for a mile.

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