bewail vs lament what difference

what is difference between bewail and lament

English

Etymology

From Middle English bewailen, equivalent to be- (over, about) +‎ wail.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɪˈweɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Verb

bewail (third-person singular simple present bewails, present participle bewailing, simple past and past participle bewailed)

  1. To wail over; to feel or express deep sorrow for
    • c. 1607, William Shakespeare, Coriolanus, Act V, Scene 6,[1]
      [] Though in this city he
      Hath widow’d and unchilded many a one,
      Which to this hour bewail the injury,
      Yet he shall have a noble memory.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Luke 8:52,[2]
      And all wept, and bewailed her: but he said, Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth.
    • 1820, William Wordsworth, “The Haunted Tree”[3]
      [] when the wind
      Blows keenly, it sends forth a creaking sound
      (Above the general roar of woods and crags)
      Distinctly heard from far–a doleful note!
      As if (so Grecian shepherds would have deemed)
      The Hamadryad, pent within, bewailed
      Some bitter wrong.

Synonyms

  • bemoan
  • grieve
  • lament

Derived terms

  • bewailable
  • bewailer
  • bewailing
  • bewailment

Translations

Anagrams

  • Waibel


English

Etymology

From French lamenter, from Latin lāmentor (I wail, weep), from lāmenta (wailings, laments, moanings); with formative -mentum, from the root *la-, probably ultimately imitative. Also see latrare.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ləˈmɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

lament (plural laments)

  1. An expression of grief, suffering, sadness or regret.
  2. A song expressing grief.

Derived terms

  • lamentful (rare)

Translations

Verb

lament (third-person singular simple present laments, present participle lamenting, simple past and past participle lamented)

  1. (intransitive) To express grief; to weep or wail; to mourn.
    • Ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice.
  2. (transitive) To feel great sorrow or regret; to bewail.
    • 2014, Paul Doyle, “Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter”, The Guardian, 18 October 2014:
      By the end, Sunderland were lucky to lose by the same scoreline Northampton Town suffered against Southampton, in 1921. The Sunderland manager, Gus Poyet, lamented that it was “the most embarrassed I’ve ever been on a football pitch, without a doubt”.
    • One laugh’d at follies, one lamented crimes.

Synonyms

  • bewail

Translations

Related terms

Further reading

  • lament in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lament in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Mantle, manlet, mantel, mantle, mental

French

Verb

lament

  1. third-person plural present indicative of lamer
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of lamer

Anagrams

  • mêlant, mental

Polish

Etymology

From Latin lāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.mɛnt/

Noun

lament m inan

  1. lament (expression of grief, suffering, or sadness)
    Synonym: lamentacja
  2. (poetry) threnody
    Synonyms: lamentacja, tren

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) lamentować

Related terms

  • (verbs) nalamentować, polamentować, zalamentować
  • (noun) lamentacja
  • (adjective) lamentacyjny

Further reading

  • lament in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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