beware vs mind what difference

what is difference between beware and mind

English

Etymology

From Middle English bewar, be war, be ware, forms of Middle English ben ware (to be on one’s guard, be vigilant, literally be ware), equivalent to be +‎ ware or be +‎ aware. Compare Old English bewarian.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌbiˈwɛəɹ/, IPA(key): /ˌbɪˈwɛəɹ/ IPA(key): /ˌbəˈwɛəɹ/
    Rhymes: -ɛə(r)

Verb

beware

  1. (defective, transitive, intransitive) To use caution, pay attention to (used both with and without of).
    • Beware the Ides of March.

Usage notes

The verb was traditionally used without of (e.g. “beware the ides of March”, from Julius Caesar Act 1, scene 2, 15–19, by Shakespeare), but it is often used with the preposition today.

The verb beware has become a defective verb and now lacks forms such as the third-person singular simple present bewares and the simple past bewared. It can only be used imperatively (Beware of the dog!), subjunctively (It’s important that he beware of the dog), or as an infinitive (You must beware of the dog or They told me to beware of the dog).

The inflected forms bewares, bewared, and bewaring are called obsolete in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage, along with the simple indicative “I beware”. The forms bewares and bewared are very rarely found in modern texts, though bewaring is slightly less rare. These inflections are more likely to be found in very old texts.

The meanings of the obsolete inflected forms can be easily understood by replacing “beware” with the more modern equivalent consisting of a conjugated form of “be” and the word “wary”. For example “bewares” means the same as “is wary”, “bewared” the same as “was wary”, etc.

Translations


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

beware

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of bewaren


English

Etymology

From Middle English minde, münde, ȝemünde, from Old English mynd, ġemynd (memory, remembrance; memorial, record; act of commemoration; thought, purpose; consciousness, mind, intellect), from Proto-Germanic *mundiz, *gamundiz (memory, remembrance), from Proto-Indo-European *méntis (thought), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think). Cognate with Old High German gimunt (mind, memory), Danish minde (memory), Icelandic minni (memory, recall, recollection), Gothic ???????????????????? (munds, memory, mind), Latin mēns (mind, reason), Sanskrit मनस् (mánas), Ancient Greek μένος (ménos), Albanian mënd (mind, reason). Related to Old English myntan (to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve). More at mint.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mīnd, IPA(key): /maɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd
  • Homophone: mined

Noun

mind (countable and uncountable, plural minds)

  1. The ability of rational thought.
    • #*
  2. The ability to be aware of things.
  3. The ability to remember things.
  4. The ability to focus the thoughts.
  5. Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  6. Judgment, opinion, or view.
  7. Desire, inclination, or intention.
  8. A healthy mental state.
  9. (philosophy) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    • 1854, Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts, p.19:
      The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  10. Continual prayer on a dead person’s behalf for a period after their death.
    a month’s [or monthly] mind; a year’s mind
  11. (uncountable) Attention, consideration or thought.
    • They are the “tars” who give mind to the spreading sail, and their bold courage is the pabulum which will preserve our sea-girt isle in its vernal green to furthest posterity.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      Then he, having mind of Beelzebub, the god of flies, fled without a halt homewards; but, falling in the coo’s loan, broke two ribs and a collar bone, the whilk misfortune was much blessed to his soul.

Synonyms

  • (ability for rational thought): brain(s), head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit; See also Thesaurus:intelligence
  • (ability to be aware of things): awareness, consciousness, sentience; See also Thesaurus:awareness
  • (ability to remember things): memory, recollection; See also Thesaurus:recollection
  • (ability to focus the thoughts): attention, concentration, focus
  • (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities): genius, intellectual, thinker; See also Thesaurus:genius
  • (judgment, opinion, or view): judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view; See also Thesaurus:judgement
  • (desire, inclination, or intention): desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood; See also Thesaurus:desire or Thesaurus:intention
  • (healthy mental state): sanity; See also Thesaurus:sanity
  • (process of): cognition, learning

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

mind (third-person singular simple present minds, present participle minding, simple past and past participle minded)

  1. To bring or recall to mind; to remember; bear or keep in mind.
    • 1878, Robert Browning, La Saisiaz, line 70:
      Mind to-morrow’s early meeting!
  2. (now regional) To remember. [from 14th c.]
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XXXVII, lines 25-26:
      The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all’s forgot.
  3. (obsolete or dialectical) To remind; put one’s mind on.
    • 1599, William Shakespear, Henry V, Act IV, sc 3:
      Farewell, kind lord; fight valiantly to-day: / And yet I do thee wrong to mind thee of it, / For thou art framed of the firm truth of valour.
    • c. 1610-11, Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, Act III, Scene 2:
      Let me be punished, that have minded you Of what you should forget.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, The Sacred Theory of the Earth
      I desire to mind those persons of what Saint Austin hath said.
    • 1689, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, “Of True and False Ideas”
      I shall only mind him, that the contrary supposition, if it could be proved, is of little use.
    • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  4. To turn one’s mind to; to observe; to notice.
    • ca. 1610–11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, sc. 2:
      Here comes a spirit of his, and to torment me / For bringing wood in slowly. I’ll fall flat; / Perchance he will not mind me.
  5. To regard with attention; to treat as of consequence.
    • 1611, King James Translators, Romans 12:16:
      Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.
    • 1907 E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, V [Uniform ed., p. 63]:
      It’s the worst thing that can ever happen to you in all your life, and you’ve got to mind it—you’ve got to mind it. They’ll come saying, ‘Bear up—trust to time.’ No, no; they’re wrong. Mind it.
  6. (chiefly imperative) To pay attention or heed to so as to obey; hence to obey; to make sure, to take care (that). [from 17th c.]
    Mind you don’t knock that glass over.
  7. (now rare except in phrases) To pay attention to, in the sense of occupying one’s mind with, to heed. [from 15th c.]
    You should mind your own business.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act I Scene i:
      My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
    • 1712, Joseph Addison, Spectator, No. 383 (May 20, 1710:
      Upon my coming down, I found all the Children of the Family got about my old Friend, and my Landlady herself, who is a notable prating Gossip, engaged in a Conference with him; being mightily pleased with his stroaking her little Boy upon the Head, and bidding him be a good Child and mind his Book.
    • 2000, George RR Martin, A Storm of Swords, Bantam 2011, page 84:
      Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.
  8. To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time. [from 17th c.]
    Would you mind my bag for me?
  9. To be careful about. [from 18th c.]
    • 2005, Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development, →ISBN, page xv:
      Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to “Mind the gap”: the boundary between train and platform.
  10. (now obsolete outside dialect) To purpose, intend, plan.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act IV, sc. 1
      I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      [] and if ever I refused to do his bidding or loitered or took my leisure he beat me with his feet more grievously than if I had been beaten with whips. He ceased not to signal with his hand wherever he was minded to go; so I carried him about the island, like a captive slave, and he bepissed and conskited my shoulders and back, dismounting not night nor day; and whenas he wished to sleep he wound his legs about his neck and leaned back and slept awhile, then arose and beat me; whereupon I sprang up in haste, unable to gainsay him because of the pain he inflicted on me.
  11. (Britain, Ireland) Take note; used to point out an exception or caveat.
    I’m not very healthy. I do eat fruit sometimes, mind.
  12. (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by. [from 16th c.]
    I wouldn’t mind an ice cream right now.
    Do you mind if I smoke?

Synonyms

  • (remember): See also Thesaurus:remember
  • (dislike): See also Thesaurus:dislike
  • (pay attention to): heed; See also Thesaurus:pay attention
  • (look after): See also Thesaurus:care

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • mind on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Danish

Verb

mind

  1. imperative of minde

Estonian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun

mind

  1. partitive singular of mina

Hungarian

Etymology

Presumably from mi? (what?).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmind]
  • Rhymes: -ind

Pronoun

mind

  1. all of it, all of them, each of them (grammatically singular)
    Synonyms: mindegyikük, mindegyik, az összes

Declension

Adverb

mind (not comparable)

  1. with everyone, all (usually of persons)
    Synonyms: mindnyájan, mindannyian
  2. (formal) increasingly (used with comparative form)
    Synonym: egyre
  3. (up) until…, up to… (used with -ig; not (until) sooner than a given point in time)
    Synonym: egészen
    (Note: Most other phrases with this meaning are written without a space: mindaddig, mindeddig, mindmáig, mindmostanáig, mindvégig)

Derived terms

Conjunction

mind

  1. (formal) both… and…, as well as
    Synonym: is

References

Further reading

  • (pronoun & adverb): mind in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (conjunction): mind in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *mendus (mark, sign).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mʲin͈d/

Noun

mind n (nominative plural mind)

  1. A symbol indicating honour or rank; a crown, insignia, emblem

Inflection

Descendants

  • Irish: mionn
  • Scottish Gaelic: mionn

Mutation

References

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 mind, minn”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scots

Etymology

From Old English ġemynd, from Proto-Germanic *gamundiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑend/

Noun

mind (plural minds)

  1. memory, recollection.
  2. mind.

Verb

mind (third-person singular present minds, present participle mindin, past mindit, past participle mindit)

  1. To remember.
  2. To remind.
  3. To mind, care.

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